turtle md

Hardware Included
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jan 22, 2005
771
0
just over there
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Anybody else going to the Wilderness Med Conference in Big Sky this summer? Just curious if any SDN'ers will be there. Anybody been before?
 
About the Ads

SAL0320

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 19, 2005
18
0
38
Charlotte, NC
Status (Visible)
Not quite as scenic as Big Sky - however much more affordable!!!

The Wake Forest SIG in conjunction with the Appalachian Center for Wilderness Medicine will be hosting the first ever wilderness medicine conference targeted specifically to the healthcare student - however residents, physicians and healthcare professionals are also welcomed. This is a great way to learn more about wilderness medicine and meet others with similar interests. The weekend will consist of lectures on wilderness medicine in extreme environments, hands on clinics and a final skills challenge on Sunday. Information about electives and other opportunities for students will also be available.
Mark your calendars for April 12-13 2008 - in sunny Winston-Salem, NC!
More Details
http://wms.org/studentgroups/sig_web_site/wakewm.htm
Register Now
http://wms.org/studentgroups/sig_web_site/wakewm.htm

Questions: Email Stephanie Lareau and DJ Williams at [email protected]

Please pass this on to anyone who might be interested!!
 

psychbender

Cynical Member
15+ Year Member
Jan 19, 2005
2,280
1,349
39
Nowhere, nowhere at all...
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Not quite as scenic as Big Sky - however much more affordable!!!

The Wake Forest SIG in conjunction with the Appalachian Center for Wilderness Medicine will be hosting the first ever wilderness medicine conference targeted specifically to the healthcare student - however residents, physicians and healthcare professionals are also welcomed. This is a great way to learn more about wilderness medicine and meet others with similar interests. The weekend will consist of lectures on wilderness medicine in extreme environments, hands on clinics and a final skills challenge on Sunday. Information about electives and other opportunities for students will also be available.
Mark your calendars for April 12-13 2008 - in sunny Winston-Salem, NC!
More Details
http://wms.org/studentgroups/sig_web_site/wakewm.htm
Register Now
http://wms.org/studentgroups/sig_web_site/wakewm.htm

Questions: Email Stephanie Lareau and DJ Williams at [email protected]

Please pass this on to anyone who might be interested!!

Heard about this back in October from Henderson at AWLS. Definitely going to be there, and forwarded the flyer to the EM group at my school.
 
D

deleted65604

Anybody else like me fail to see the point of wilderness medicine? In the end, the treatment is always, get them off the mountain and give them oxygen. If they crump, what are you going to do about it that a paramedic couldn't? A while back, I remember seeing one of those ACEP newsletters talking about some resident calling the shots at altitude. Then it described "calling the shots". Making first aid kits? What good is a doctor outside the hospital? You are just a poorly trained paramedic without hospitals, imaging, lab tests and therapeutic interventions. If someone is mountain climbing, they better know just as much about mountain sickness, pulmonary sickness, etc. than any physician up there on the mountain. Otherwise, they have no business being mountain climbing. The same goes for every other outdoor situation. If they are cold, warm them, if they are hot, cool them and hydrate them. If they are bleeding, compress the bleeding. Immobilize stuff that hurts, most importantly, neck and get them to the hospital.
 

sleepymed

The white Hard24Get
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jun 24, 2005
1,480
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Anybody else like me fail to see the point of wilderness medicine? In the end, the treatment is always, get them off the mountain and give them oxygen. If they crump, what are you going to do about it that a paramedic couldn't? A while back, I remember seeing one of those ACEP newsletters talking about some resident calling the shots at altitude. Then it described "calling the shots". Making first aid kits? What good is a doctor outside the hospital? You are just a poorly trained paramedic without hospitals, imaging, lab tests and therapeutic interventions. If someone is mountain climbing, they better know just as much about mountain sickness, pulmonary sickness, etc. than any physician up there on the mountain. Otherwise, they have no business being mountain climbing. The same goes for every other outdoor situation. If they are cold, warm them, if they are hot, cool them and hydrate them. If they are bleeding, compress the bleeding. Immobilize stuff that hurts, most importantly, neck and get them to the hospital.

I think the purpose of wilderness medicine is to teach you how to get BACK to the hospital. Teaches you how to stabilize that patient with the minimum equipment you have and get them somewhere where they can get the help they need. You learn stuff like hair tourniquets and the many uses of a safety pin.
 

Dr. Dukes

10+ Year Member
Sep 24, 2006
916
1
The hall in which Odin received the souls of slain
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
I think the purpose of wilderness medicine is to teach you how to get BACK to the hospital. Teaches you how to stabilize that patient with the minimum equipment you have and get them somewhere where they can get the help they need. You learn stuff like hair tourniquets and the many uses of a safety pin.

I'm sorry, but if I had to saftey pin a guy's tongue to his lower lip to control his airway I think I'd vomit everywhere, like 14 times...
 

Dr. Dukes

10+ Year Member
Sep 24, 2006
916
1
The hall in which Odin received the souls of slain
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Anybody else like me fail to see the point of wilderness medicine? In the end, the treatment is always, get them off the mountain and give them oxygen. If they crump, what are you going to do about it that a paramedic couldn't? A while back, I remember seeing one of those ACEP newsletters talking about some resident calling the shots at altitude. Then it described "calling the shots". Making first aid kits? What good is a doctor outside the hospital? You are just a poorly trained paramedic without hospitals, imaging, lab tests and therapeutic interventions. If someone is mountain climbing, they better know just as much about mountain sickness, pulmonary sickness, etc. than any physician up there on the mountain. Otherwise, they have no business being mountain climbing. The same goes for every other outdoor situation. If they are cold, warm them, if they are hot, cool them and hydrate them. If they are bleeding, compress the bleeding. Immobilize stuff that hurts, most importantly, neck and get them to the hospital.

The reason I find it interesting is I like hiking/climbing, all that stuff, and since I'm an EMT and in Med School I feel obligated to help people who hurt themselves. Therefore, the more training/experience I have, the more comfortable I feel doing X, Y, and Z to someone both from a patient care standpoint (making them better) and a training standpoint (I'd probably help them even if I didn't know anything, so I might as well know something...).
That, and its cool (which is, I suspect, the real reason a lot of people do it).
 

psychbender

Cynical Member
15+ Year Member
Jan 19, 2005
2,280
1,349
39
Nowhere, nowhere at all...
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
If someone is mountain climbing, they better know just as much about mountain sickness, pulmonary sickness, etc. than any physician up there on the mountain. Otherwise, they have no business being mountain climbing. The same goes for every other outdoor situation. If they are cold, warm them, if they are hot, cool them and hydrate them. If they are bleeding, compress the bleeding. Immobilize stuff that hurts, most importantly, neck and get them to the hospital.

Unfortunately, tons of people are out in the woods/mountains/rivers/etc that "have no business being there." They don't know basic land navigation, survival, first aid techniques, or what to do in the event that something bad actually does happen. This trend is only going to increase as these activities are increasingly viewed as safe (and easy) because of newer technologies. I like wilderness med because I started on this whole medicine path from wilderness search and rescue and EMS. I enjoy both the outdoors and medicine, and like it when I can combine the two. I also want to become a medical director for a SAR and/or EMS agency, and would like to have some new things to bring back to the people that initially trained me.

...and because it's cool
 

DogFaceMedic

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 18, 2006
552
3
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
As long as there are dumb people who feed the bears and climb mountains in speedos, wilderness medicine will have a place. Also, the simple EMT scoop and scoot to the nearest ER doesn't cut it when a patient requires stabilization for hours or more before evacuation.

And, it is cool.

There are three medical wilderness races coming up, too. North medwar in NY in a few weeks. MCG runs its race March 29th, and EVMS has its race April 5th. Some of the races are offering CMEs as well. So, running around in the woods is fun, educational, and a tax deduction.
 

mvemsnp

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 3, 2007
34
1
Status (Visible)
Has anyone here done the wilderness medicine elective through cornell medical school? They go to arizona for a week for backcountry survival skill training. sounds fun but i would like to hear some firsthand experiences. Thanks!
 
D

deleted65604

I'd rather be in nature and not think about medicine personally. I agree, for some stupid reason, there is a perception that wilderness medicine is cool. I have gone through 3 years of residency and continue to fail to see why a wilderness medicine guru needs anything more than paramedic training. I think that if you want to go to a conference on wilderness medicine, because that is the only way you can get to the mountains, fine, but don't think it will make you a better doctor, or teach you anything useful about patient care. If you want an outdoor hobby, then get one. Take the money you would spend on a wilderness medicine course and go skiing, or snowmobiling, or biking. There are a dozens things you could do besides waste your time thinking you are going to pad your resume, or somehow look cooler and more residency worthy by going to some lame conference. Obviously, what you do with your time is your business, but I didn't want some med student thinking that to be cool, they had to go to wilderness medicine conference like all the cool people on SDN.
 

jbar

Senior Member
Dec 18, 2005
949
15
39
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
wilderness medicine is a specific skill set. And while I agree that in difficulty and scope it may not be much different from being a paramedic, most medic courses don't teach you how to improvise a traction splint, or the pharmacology of altitude sickness drugs. While there are not a lot of roles for wilderness docs, the people writing the textbooks, setting the protocols and overseeing the search and rescue teams should have some additional training besides the normal EM/EMS course.
 

DogFaceMedic

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 18, 2006
552
3
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
I'd rather be in nature and not think about medicine personally. I agree, for some stupid reason, there is a perception that wilderness medicine is cool. I have gone through 3 years of residency and continue to fail to see why a wilderness medicine guru needs anything more than paramedic training. I think that if you want to go to a conference on wilderness medicine, because that is the only way you can get to the mountains, fine, but don't think it will make you a better doctor, or teach you anything useful about patient care. If you want an outdoor hobby, then get one. Take the money you would spend on a wilderness medicine course and go skiing, or snowmobiling, or biking. There are a dozens things you could do besides waste your time thinking you are going to pad your resume, or somehow look cooler and more residency worthy by going to some lame conference. Obviously, what you do with your time is your business, but I didn't want some med student thinking that to be cool, they had to go to wilderness medicine conference like all the cool people on SDN.

You just wish you were as cool as the rest of us. But why are you so worried about what the rest of us like to do? Show a little tolerance.

Practically, wilderness training of any kind teaches improvisation and thinking outside of hospital protocols. It is a great way to improve clinical reasoning. Quite simply: what will you do when you do not have a hospital near by?

Wilderness medicine is one of the best forms of EM -- which is distinct from the EM guy everyone complains about whose challenge in life is to figure out where to turf the patient.
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 13 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.