1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Hey Texans—join us for a DFW meetup! Click here to learn more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

will job during year off work against me?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Ste1185, Nov 27, 2005.

  1. Ste1185

    Ste1185 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    im thinking about trying i-banking or management consulting during my year (or two) off to rake up some extra $$ before i have to spend it all in med school/residency. it may even allow me to work abroad, which is something i want to do.

    will this reflect negatively on me for medschool admissions (they'll think i'm some greedy capitalist pig-dog or something...)? will it even help that i've gained some "real world" experience? or should i be spending my year off doing something med/research related?
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member
    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    30,989
    Likes Received:
    9,858
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    It won't necessarilly hurt you, and could even help you in terms of experience diversity, but you will probably want to get some medically related experience on the side, and may have a greater need to demonstrate an interest in medicine after having taken such an unrelated career turn. Med schools want you to be sure you really want to take that route, and so if you show an interest in something else, the "why medicine?" question tends to loom larger. But lots of people have made career changes to medicine.
     
  4. jbone

    jbone Herro!
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Messages:
    2,274
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    I've taken a year off, but I work at a hospital in the laboratory. Can you get a medically related job?? Pays just as good. I felt the same way but my interviewers have really stressed the importance of clinical exposure to medicine. Good luck! :thumbup:
     
  5. pseudoknot

    Physician PhD Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2004
    Messages:
    2,925
    Likes Received:
    5
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    The only medically related jobs that pay as well as I-banking and consulting are physician or hospital administrator. If your lab job pays as well as that, we'd all love to hear more about it.
     
  6. jbone

    jbone Herro!
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Messages:
    2,274
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    If it pays that much, that what the hell are you asking us for. Go make some cash. :thumbup:
     
  7. SharpieMarker

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2005
    Messages:
    161
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I say that if you have clinical exposure and have proven your interest in medicine already, do whatever you want during your time off. I basically mean that if you're using your year as a year off, and not a year to strengthen your application, then again, do whatever you want. It's not as important to do something groundbreaking or intensely medically related, as long as you can talk enthusiastically about it and show that you were productive during the year and learned something, instead of simply bumming on a couch. It might even make you a unique and interesting candidate.

    If that something happens to be business-oriented, and that's how you want to spend your year before your gazillion years of med education, go for it. But I'll stress that this suggestion assumes that you've already proven your interest in medicine through your other activities. Make sure you have clinical exposure. I've heard some admissions people stress the importance of this.

    I know a UPenn med student who taught high school kids for a year. Others travel or otherwise take advantage of opportunities they won't be able to later, like Teach for America, PeaceCorps, etc. I don't think you should let the application dictate your life.
     
  8. Ste1185

    Ste1185 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    By the time I graduate, my "clinical exposure" (not counting medically-related research which should relate with why i want to go into medicine) should (some projections here) consist of emergency room volunteer (100 hrs over 2 semesters), work in private office (70 hrs over 4 weeks), shadowing a surgeon (50 hrs over 2 weeks), shadowing an er doc (70 hrs over 1 semester), and volunteering in a health clinic (50 hrs over 1 semester). suppose this is enough? problem is, if i try a high paying corporate slave job i won't even have time to sleep, let alone keep up with medically related activities, so there will be a gap.
     
  9. SharpieMarker

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2005
    Messages:
    161
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Haha, you hands down have enough clinical exposure to make the med folks happy. Be able to explain why you chose to do something non-medically related (and the answer may be as simple as you wanted to try it, this is what I learned, but I'm now more than ever committed to life as a physician, etc.).

    Imagine yourself on the admissions committee. They realize that not everyone can devote 100% of their time to medicine and that many people may not want to. These are educated, smart people. They realize that people may *gasp* have other interests, or even need to get a better paying job than a peon research assistant in order to offset crazy med school debt. I think that they want to see someone who is enthusiastic about their choices as well as about med school, while still seeing that the person has a dedication to medicine.

    It is a gap year for a reason. If you don't need it to devote to post-bacc classes, gaining clinical exposure, getting research experience, etc. (which it doesn't seem like you do), seriously, do whatever you want. If you end up doing something you want to do, you'll 1) enjoy it more, 2) learn more from it, and 3) be a convincing interview candidate. Believe me, it's shallow and obvious when someone has done "research" for the heck of it, or has done something half-heartedly because they simply think they need it for their med school app.

    I mean, I worked at an art museum for a summer, but I can explain why I did it, what I enjoyed about it, what I learned, and why it was more worthwhile than doing another summer of research.

    But that's my opinion. I have never been a fan of tailoring your life to an application. Ultimately, of course, it's your decision. Do what makes you comfortable. I think there are far better ways of spending your time than trying to guess what admissions committees are looking for, and your time is worth far more than that.
     
  10. SearsTower

    SearsTower Membership Revoked
    Removed

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2005
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    why the hell would it work against you? I based my whole personal statement on money (actually on my venture in real estate).
     
  11. SharpieMarker

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2005
    Messages:
    161
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    haha, that's awesome!
     
  12. unfrozencaveman

    unfrozencaveman not a dude
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey- I worked in management consulting for two years after I graduated. In terms of my application, it was a major plus (although you have to make a convincing point for switching fields). I would caution you this- your first two years in consulting or banking can be killer. A LOT of work-- which you only do in order to pay your dues and make it up the ladder (first two years, you make some money, years three, four, you make a ton). But a lot of places will absolutely kill when you start out. I'm sure you've heard the horror stories. If you're set on medical school, it will be easy to check out of this kind of job if you have no long term interest in it, and after that happens, it can be pretty punishing.

    But, in no way in my case did it do anything negative to my application (so I think). In interviews it's alwyas brought up as a positive, and I've actually met a couple interviewers (students and faculty) who have done the exact same thing.
     

Share This Page