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Will my UK citizenship help me for British residency placements?

Discussion in 'UK & Ireland' started by DocDrex1, Nov 28, 2008.

  1. DocDrex1

    2+ Year Member

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    Hey guys,

    Just wondering...I'm a UK citizen and a Canadian citizen. I did my undergrad in Canada and I'm planning to go to medical school abroad (since it's very competitive in Canada). I know my UK citizenship won't help me for fees since I haven't lived in the UK for years (I've looked into this situation deeply), but will my UK citizenship help me in other ways? Say, for post-graduate training in the UK?

    Also, is post-graduate training in the UK something you guys would recommend? I've heard it's very difficult to get post-grad training in the UK even for local graduates. I don't mean the 2 foundation years, I mean the specialty training after these years. Thanks for the help guys.

    Drex
     
  2. bambi

    bambi Junior Member
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    It should help you yes.

    If you are good enough you will get a job. The UK is among the best in the world when it comes to medical training.
     
  3. Scottish Chap

    Physician PhD Moderator Emeritus Verified Expert 15+ Year Member

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    They'll grab you with both arms. There is a still a huge physician shortage in the U.K. right now. When I completed a month-long clinical attachment in the U.K. this summer, I was told that I would be acceptable to begin postgraduate training 'as is' (British citizen; graduating from a U.S. medical school in May 2009). Getting into the system is key (foundation years) if you want to pursue specialty training.

    The British health care model, however, is totally different from what you've experienced in Canada, and you might find the pace unacceptably frustrating. Saying postgraduate medical education in North America or the U.K. is better than anywhere else in the world, however, is simply not true.....each system has benefits and drawbacks.
     
  4. Zuckman

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    What if one has a UK citizenship but does medicine in Australia. I'm planning to do it in Australia but I want to keep the option of doing post-grad training in the UK. I know I'll have to write the PLAB, but would my UK citizenship help me after the PLAB if I graduate from an Australian school? I'm also planning on doing internship in Australia.
     
  5. leorl

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Verified Account 10+ Year Member

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    Bottom line is that if you have UK citizenship, it will help you. The ones who are in more "trouble" are non-Eu, non-citizens.
     
  6. bambi

    bambi Junior Member
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    We don't have a doctor shortage anymore and haven't for a few years. Even UK grads have struggled to find jobs recently, that's why they changed the rules about non-EU folk. Anyway, if you are an EU citizen you will compete equally with UK grads for all posts.

    No one said the UK and US were THE best, if you actually read the post it said AMONG THE BEST in the world.
     
  7. ocularphd

    ocularphd New Member
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    Your citizenship will allow you to be on par with other British citizens when applying for postgraduate training.

    To get into training (especially competitive specialities) you must be prepared to be committed to the speciality. It is increasingly common for the medical students that I teach, to become involved in research/audits/presentations/publications whilst still in medical school. This will get them "ahead of the game" in the future if they are successful in these extracurricular projects beforehand.

    If you are committed, you will progress.

    UK training is long. With the new MMC training, this has shortened to 7/8 years compared to old SpR training system where training lasted for 10+ years.

    Best of luck in your career:luck:
     
  8. Scottish Chap

    Physician PhD Moderator Emeritus Verified Expert 15+ Year Member

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  9. bambi

    bambi Junior Member
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    I mean we have enough doctors to fill the posts, at foundation at least but yeah there aren't really enough posts so in that sense I guess you could say there is a shortage, that make sense?
     
  10. Prolif

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    Don't worry about the doctors thing. Basically its a problem mostly isolated to London and mostly the problem was last year.

    Because new medical schools were built they ate into the area the London schools used to fill. London exports doctors as there are 5 medical schools which is more graduates than the city needs. People who go to london medical schools tend to have a bit of an attitude issue about moving north of watford, they're quite happy to go down the Brighton or Southampton, or hang around Guildford but the northeast is an insult to them.

    When they went to medical school, they were told that they would all graduate out into london. Of course the system changes and many were forced elsehwere, where their london medical degrees were no better than say a Keele medical degree.
     
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  11. bambi

    bambi Junior Member
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    It wasn't just London and it wasn't just last year
    Er.. yeah, UEA, Keele eating into the area London schools used to fill? I don't think so
    That is just nonsense
     
  12. gfdaly

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    Hi everyone! I'm new to this site, but I had some questions I thought someone might know the answers to. I'm a UK citizen who has been living in the US for quite some time, and I'm currently in medical school in the US. I would quite like to move back to the UK as soon as it's possible, and I'm wondering when the best time would be and how to go about doing it. For instance, is it feasible to move as soon as I graduate from medical school here in the US? Would it be worth it to do a transitional year so that I'm fully licensed in the US (you don't take the last step of the US licensing exam until after intern year)...would that make it easier to move to the UK? Also, once I've gotten an MD, what would be required of me to get into the profession in the UK? Would I have to take the PLAB or is there an international licensing exam? Sorry for all of the questions...if anyone can provide me with resources as far as what the steps are to go from a US medical school to a UK residency, I'd really appreciate it!
     

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