Longshanks

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Hi guys,

So I withdrew from this most recent MD application cycle (withdrew all my secondaries) and told my premed committee that I was not applying, but I keep getting emails about letter of rec status from amcas. Just to be sure I am not considered a reapplicant next year, is there anyway to completely withdraw the AMCAS application?
If you submitted AMCAS or received any secondaries from a school, you will be considered a reapplicant next year.
 

Charles_Carmichael

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If you submitted AMCAS or received any secondaries from a school, you will be considered a reapplicant next year.
Yea, this is what I always thought as well. That just submitting a primary and receiving offers of secondaries is enough to make you a reapplicant if you apply the next year. I could be wrong since I have not looked much further into this matter but, if this is the case, it doesn't bode too well for your strategy.
 

apumic

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Since someone who is offered NO secondaries but has submitted their AMCAS is considered a reapplicant if they apply again (e.g., think the applicant who applies only to a few top schools that screen with an abysmal score combo like 3.0/25), it would follow that receiving secondaries after submitting your AMCAS makes you a reapplicant. Sorry, but your strategy pretty much is failing. Why would you decide at this pt to withdraw?!

 
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thestrokes14

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Jul 12, 2009
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Weird. My premed adviser specifically told me to consider withdrawing my applications so that I wouldn't be considered a reapplicant. Note that my LOR were never submitted, so technically, my AMCAS wasn't completely finished. That's why I keep getting those AMCAS emails reminding me about the LOR status.

I chose to withdraw because I wasn't happy with my MCAT score, and I took the test pretty late.
 
Mar 31, 2010
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Your AMCAS application can be verified and sent to schools without the letters. If it is sent to schools regardless of if you complete the secondaries you are still considered a reapplicant.
 
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thestrokes14

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Jul 12, 2009
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Does it really matter if I am considered a "reapplicant" when I was never rejected from any school, and my only serious flaw was clearly my MCAT score (provided I get a better score for this next cycle)? It just seems really odd.
 

apumic

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Does it really matter if I am considered a "reapplicant" when I was never rejected from any school, and my only serious flaw was clearly my MCAT score (provided I get a better score for this next cycle)? It just seems really odd.
You still need to show "significant improvement" since your first round, as you were considered "rejected" by the schools to which you initially applied (in spite of "withdrawing" from your perspective). (Not submitting a secondary to a school, turning down an interview, etc. will result in the school considering you "rejected.")
 
Oct 21, 2010
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What's the point in withdrawing now? Even if your MCAT score is on the lower side, an invite could still come out of left field for some reason.

If the applications are out, the fees are paid, and you will be a re-applicant no matter what, how could there possibly be any benefit to withdrawing?

Edit: I found your stats in your older posts, and an MD acceptance is not impossible with those stats, however unlikely it might be. If you withdrew, your perhaps 10-15% chance of an MD acceptance this cycle just became zero percent.
 
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thestrokes14

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I'm not looking to get into the top medical school, but I've put in a lot of work with research and my courses, and I feel like my MCAT score is really not representative of my effort. Honestly, I blew the verbal section (of all sections) and I just feel like I can do so much better than applying and possibly getting a chance at a lower end school. I'm not expecting much, but I couldn't live with myself if I didn't give myself a fair shot at a wider range of schools.

Anyway, I guess it is true that I am considered rejected from all schools that I initially applied to, but I think my situation is a bit unique, since it was clearly my MCAT score that brought me down.
 
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thestrokes14

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And to answer you question about why I would withdraw: I was told that schools would question my judgment by applying with such a low MCAT score; and honestly, I have to agree. It just seems like the right thing to do. Not to mention, I can gain a lot of experience with the extra year #optimism.
 

eablackwell

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Sorry about the re-applicant status next year. You're right, with a low MCAT score it would look like poor judgement in applying. However, it's already over and done I'm afraid, as several have already said. This is why most people try to have an MCAT score before submitting their primary, so they have a good idea of if they will be competitive that cycle or not.

One thing I have learned about advisors is that they are unfortunately not always right. It's obvious that your advisor's lack of knowledge spurred you to withdraw when other than saving you secondary fees, it isn't really much to your advantage at this point.

However, don't panic! Just improve your application and give it a go again next year. If people can come back from abysmal gpas, institutional actions, etc, then you will be fine.

Good luck next cycle! And stick around the boards, because we have a lot of good procedural info. :thumbup: