Mar 26, 2010
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Hello All,

I have been reading all of the threads on here for quite some time and I have to say it is all very informative. There are a lot of pluses as well as minuses to joining military medicine. I am currently a sophomore in college and a female interested in going to the USUHS (Army 1st choice Navy 2nd). I would like to know what it is truly like being not only a woman in the Army, but a Doctor as well.
With all male dominating fields and areas there is a level of **** one has to put up with being female. I know I was a bit of a tomboy growing up and constantly had to put up with it, but don't really mind. Even if the person responding is not female, I would still like to know, to a certain extent, what their female colleagues had to put up with. Should I serve in the Army or in the Navy and how much of a difference is between the two branches.
And any additional information about USUHS would be highly appreciated ( u know campus life, what it is truly like, training, etc.) I know there is a thread here about it, but I would like to here more.


Thanks Everyone U guys are really informative,

Futuredoc1215 :)
 

DrMetal

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Hello All,




Thanks Everyone U guys are really informative,

Futuredoc1215 :)
Well, what exactly are your concerns? There are plenty of female physicians in today's military. Some are happy, some are not.

As far as the unhappy ones go, I don't think they're unhappy b/c they feel discriminated against, per their gender. Rather, I think they're unhappy per professional/personal reasons that are gender neutral. For instance, if you're a military surgeon who's unhappy per a low case volume, that has nothing to do with your gender (not necessarily at least). That has more to do with the fact that you're in the military, stationed at some BFE MTF.

So really, in terms of being a female, you'll probably be just fine, no better no worse than your male counterparts. But, you should carefully weigh your personal/professional goals and make sure they fall in line (or at least agree somewhat) with the mission of the military. If so, you're good to go. If not, don't join (or at least not yet, maybe reconsider later in your career).
 
Aug 23, 2009
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I don't think I've ever been discriminated against ever for being a female in medicine. I mean other than the comments made by my preceptors advising me to pursue specialties that have more family friendly hours which I would not consider a discriminatory comment, just a realistic one. I guess its a matter of perspective.
 
Aug 23, 2009
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I would actually like to add a question. I understand that when a female gets pregnant in the military, deployments and responsibilities get put on other people which can be frustrating for people who are already overworked. I understand that this can cause people to resent women who get pregnant in the military, is there still a stigma against women getting pregnant in military med?

Thanks
 
Mar 26, 2010
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Well, what exactly are your concerns? There are plenty of female physicians in today's military. Some are happy, some are not.

As far as the unhappy ones go, I don't think they're unhappy b/c they feel discriminated against, per their gender. Rather, I think they're unhappy per professional/personal reasons that are gender neutral. For instance, if you're a military surgeon who's unhappy per a low case volume, that has nothing to do with your gender (not necessarily at least). That has more to do with the fact that you're in the military, stationed at some BFE MTF.

So really, in terms of being a female, you'll probably be just fine, no better no worse than your male counterparts. But, you should carefully weigh your personal/professional goals and make sure they fall in line (or at least agree somewhat) with the mission of the military. If so, you're good to go. If not, don't join (or at least not yet, maybe reconsider later in your career).
That is true it does all depend on the individual regardless of gender. Guess I wanted to know what it was like for Female docs in the military. I still have two more years left in college and the USUHS is looking pretty good right now. I live in a very military orientated community (VA Beach is VERY militaristic) and that does have some influence on me. All of the individuals in this area seem very motivated driven hard working people. They get up at the crack of dawn every weekday and head down to the base to work. Many of my friends are in the military as well. I consider it a HUGE honor to serve the men and women who fight for this country.
Also, I believe a career in military medicine will provide me with the tools necessary to become a well rounded individual. Honestly, My family has no medals or traditions or prestige. I'm not doing it for those things, but they are nice. Unlike civilian medical training, I feel as though I will have the ability to learn about all aspects of medicine (combat, hospital,humanitarianism, etc). So whether I do get accepted into USUHS (hope so) or I take the Army scholarship, I am looking forward to serving this country, The soldiers, and doing a great honor and proving to myself that I am a leader and I do have a voice and I am capable of so much more. Wow. that was long. :)
 

DrMetal

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I would actually like to add a question. I understand that when a female gets pregnant in the military, deployments and responsibilities get put on other people which can be frustrating for people who are already overworked. I understand that this can cause people to resent women who get pregnant in the military, is there still a stigma against women getting pregnant in military med?

Thanks
Well, I'd say 'Yes', the stigma still exists. But what are you gonna do? The military can't make policy prohibiting people from harboring a resentment, for whatever reason; that's just human nature.

Now if you get pregnant just to get out of a deployment (and you had no intention of getting pregnant in the first place) . . . .then you need a psych eval.

If you intended to get pregnant and strategically timed it to avoid a deployment, that's also not cool, in my book at least.

In this regard, I'd just advise: Do the right thing. If it's your turn to deploy, do so, come back and get pregnant, no one will hold anything against you (in fact, many would probably bend over backwards to help). Also when you get home from your deployment, you should be home for at least 18 months (in the medical corp at least). This'll give you plenty of time to have the baby and be closeby for the first year.