May 22, 2010
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Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I wouldn't treat it like you're treating human patients.

I would treat it like a job with some exposure to a medical workplace dynamic.

That's it. I would put it as a work and what you do.
 
Jul 1, 2011
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I was just curious if adcoms would consider working at an animal hospital relevant and possibly count as clinical experience. I work full time at a fairly prestigious animal hospital and I love animals but I know for sure that human medicine is where I belong. I just find it to me more cutting edge, relevant, and in need. Anyway, as a receptionist I do a lot of "medical stuff". We fill 99% of prescriptions (except controlled substances) which are mostly human medications. Prednisone, amoxicillan, zithromyocin, etc. and from experience I know what many medications are and what they are used to treat. We do a lot of chart work, checking clients in and out of appointments, invoicing, and through it I've picked up basic veterinary knowledge. I've also gotten opportunities to help with ultra sounds, xrays, looking at fecal samples for parasites, given minor vaccines (kennel cough, influenza). I get to peak at a lot of surgeries as well. We serve as the intermediaries between clients and the vets, putting me in a great position to ask lots of questions about different diseases/ conditions etc. We are also informed on veterinary nutrition in relation to the many prescription diets we sell. I know that this is not as relevant as working in a people hospital, but I am working on my EMT and the pay is well for the time being so I am wondering if this is a point worth elaborating on. To reference Lizzy M I can most definitley smell the patients! Especially when they crap in the lobby... Or try a beagle or any other floppy ear'd beast with a long overdue check up for an ear infection. :p
I loled. To adcoms, the clinical experience is the process of attending to sick patients, not animals. Obtaining clinical experience is necessary in order to demonstrate that you are aware of the profession of medicine and its human component. You instead describe an EC that exposes you to veterinary medicine.

In fact, I would hesitate to put volunteering at an animal hospital as an EC because some adcoms might question your commitment to an MD program. You come off as an applicant with a history of experience working in a veterinary setting, and adcoms may question why you're not pursuing a DVM program at State. I assume you are getting paid as a receptionist? Downplay it as a job, maybe as a volunteering experience, but it is definitely not a clinical experience. Make sure you can also back up the rest of your application with serious evidence of patient interaction to assuage any adcom fears for a preference for animal medicine. Is the risk worth the reward? I'm not quite sure that it is.
 
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NickNaylor

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I loled. To adcoms, the clinical experience is the process of attending to sick patients, not animals. Obtaining clinical experience is necessary in order to demonstrate that you are aware of the profession of medicine and its human component. You instead describe an EC that exposes you to veterinary medicine.

In fact, I would hesitate to put volunteering at an animal hospital as an EC because some adcoms might question your commitment to an MD program. You come off as an applicant with a history of experience working in a veterinary setting, and adcoms may question why you're not pursuing a DVM program at State. I assume you are getting paid as a receptionist? Downplay it as a job, maybe as a volunteering experience, but it is definitely not a clinical experience. Make sure you can also back up the rest of your application with serious evidence of patient interaction to assuage any adcom fears for a preference for animal medicine. Is the risk worth the reward? I'm not quite sure that it is.
I wouldn't go that far. The experience definitely doesn't count as a clinical experience, but that doesn't mean that it has no value for medical admissions. Remember that the goal of ECs is to demonstrate certain qualities and knowledge about the medical profession. Though this can't do the latter, it can definitely do the former (demonstrates professionalism, ability to work on a team, etc.).

You could use the whole "questioning your motivations" argument for almost any activity.
 

penguinism

5+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2011
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I dabbled in veterinary medicine before deciding on pursuing human medicine, and I put that on my application. My job as a vet tech was valuable to me and I learned a lot, though after volunteering at a hospital I realized that I prefer human patients. Cats are adorable, but they can be extremely vicious at the vet (and I have the scars to show from it).

OP, I would list it on your application, but make sure that you have exposure to human medicine as well and can explain why you chose it. You can also talk about it in your personal statement.
 

zwitterion34

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Aug 11, 2011
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This is what it says on page 69 near the end of paragraph 1 of Doctor Confidential: Secrets Behind the Veil by Richard Sheff.

"Often they couldn't speak English, so we had to work with translators, when they were available. When they weren't, we did our best to make do with sign language for symptoms, but trying to obtain any medical history was hopeless. The residents described this as practicing veterinary medicine, since we had no way of talking to the patients."

I'll let you decide if it is relevant or not. Hope it helps.
 

postbacpremed87

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Jan 26, 2011
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Here is what it can be listed as:

*A non-clinical/non-health care related job. Listing it as such will make them laugh in a way that doesn't benefit you.

*A hobby

By the way, I love beagles so that should give you some points in my book.
 
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