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Work hard, play hard!

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by modemduck, Apr 4, 2002.

  1. modemduck

    modemduck Senior Member

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    ... seems to be the philosophy of many med students.

    I was just wondering what sort of advice you guys would have to offer to an incoming MS1, concerning effective studying and also finding time to have fun.

    I am really excited about next yr, but also a little scared.

    THX
    Roy
     
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  3. Scooby Doo

    Scooby Doo IEatShavedPussyCats

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    Time is precious!

    Combine all activities!

    Drink beer WHILE attending lecture!

    <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" />
     
  4. squeek

    squeek Senior Member

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    1) Make sure you don't try to read everything that's assigned. I learned this the hard way--my grades actually went up when I stopped reading everything that was "recommended," or even "required"! There's no possible way to cover everything, and if you do, often you end up not focusing on the facts that are really important to know. The key is selective reading--focus on things you feel you need to understand better, or things you feel lectures didn't adequately cover.

    2) Buy board review books for each class. These are great for helping you figure out what you "really need to know," and they're great for pre-test review. Also, for those tests that you just didn't have time to cover everything, they are a godsend. I highly recommend Costanzo's Physiology and Chung's Anatomy for first year, and the BRS Pathology for second year. A plus is that you'll have them annotated and you'll be familiar with them when it comes to the boards.

    3) Study effectively--by that I mean spend 2-3 hours really studying to understand. Then quit and do something fun. This works a lot better than trying to hold marathon study sessions, in which you end up gazing into the distance or napping on your books. :)

    4) Be consistent. Read lecture transcripts the day before the lecture. In the evenings, try to read the material and review lectures for the material covered that day. This will save you a lot of time in the end, and you'll remember the material better in the long run. Granted, this isn't always possible, due to the million and a half other things going on in life, but try to do it as much as you can.

    5) Make sure you play and sleep as much as you need. Again, not always possible, but it sure helps. Its much easier to study after a break than it is to study for 4 hours on top of 5--especially if you're tired.

    6) Take at least one day off a week, with no studying allowed. I usually take Saturdays off, if possible, or another day if we have a Monday test.

    7) Don't let it drive you insane. :) Life is much easier if you don't let it stress you out.

    Good luck, and congratulations on your acceptance!
     
  5. Future_Doc

    Future_Doc Senior Member

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    Great advice, squeek! What year are you?
     
  6. squeek

    squeek Senior Member

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    I just today finished my second year. "Thank God Almighty, I'm free at last!" :) NOOOOO more basic sciences! Wooohooo! Now just to jump that hurdle they call "the boards"...
     
  7. Future_Doc

    Future_Doc Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by squeek:
    <strong>1) Make sure you don't try to read everything that's assigned. I learned this the hard way--my grades actually went up when I stopped reading everything that was "recommended," or even "required"! There's no possible way to cover everything, and if you do, often you end up not focusing on the facts that are really important to know. The key is selective reading--focus on things you feel you need to understand better, or things you feel lectures didn't adequately cover.
    </strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">To quote Matthew Modine in GROSS ANATOMY: "I read the bold-type. Everything you need to know is in the bold-type." Now, while I know that this is a "Gross exaggeration" - is there any substance to this? How much can you accomplish by reviewing your class notes, syllabus and reading the bold and exerpts from texts (appenixes and such)?
     

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