Would having a Masters degree help later in med career? Quick answers needed puhleas

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tugbug

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I am in the middle of the last class I need to finish my MS. For reasons I wont get into, I am seriously considering getting out of the class. I've already been accepted for the Fall and Ive already checked with the Med schools that have accepted me so that part is not a factor.

My question is... Does anyone know if having a masters would help later... maybe look good on the resume or help with the match. If it is a big help, then I might try to fit the class in this summer. If it is a non-factor then forget the degree...

Thanks for any help.
 

jlee9531

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well thats nice that your med school will let you matriculate without having you complete your masters. my friend's school wasnt so generous.

but anyways...since noone seems to be answering ill just give you what i think and take it for what its worth.

i cant see how having an MS can harm you in anyway at all. esp. if you are thinking about going into a specialty for the match where the program would like to see that you have some research experience, this would be an especially good thing...i would think.

my friend got his MS for the same reason cause he believed that it would help him out during his med school app cycle and later on for residency matches.

if its just one more class...i mean you worked so hard to get to this point anyway...might as well finish it no?
 

tugbug

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Thanks for replying jlee,

Id like to finish up. I may be able to. But, if I cant do it this semester then summer is the only option and that will make moving and getting ready for school a real pain.

BTW, only one school said finishing wasnt "absolutely required" but they made me get a letter from my advisor saying he was ok with it. The others said no go unless I finish.
 

jlee9531

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is that one school your top choice out of the schools you have been accepted to?
 

NRAI2001

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I have a similar question, I will have a year off between the time I graduate and medschool. I wasn't sure if I should do an accelerated masters programm like georgetown or finch or if I should just stay home, travel, and do other non school related activities. I know it is a bit early to decide, but I would like to eventually get a surgical residency and I was wondering what the masters programms give me any sort of edge when applying to residency programms?
 

jamnx

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I am also on the last class of my master's and I'm writing my thesis. Don't quit now! I'm sure you've put in quite a bit of time and effort - it would be a shame to stop when you're so close!

I've had the same feelings while writing this damn thesis... suck it up.
 

tugbug

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It's not really a matter of sucking it up... It may quickly become impossible this semester for a couple of reasons. The decision whether to "suck it up" or not happens in the summer. Good luck on the thesis.
 

tugbug

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Originally posted by jlee9531
is that one school your top choice out of the schools you have been accepted to?

It is now ;)
 

NE_Cornhusker1

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it's not gonna hurt and if you play it right the ms could become very helpful. if you're looking towards a top-flight residency they'll want to see research on your app. that's not to say that your research will be oodles better with one more class under your belt but the ms behind your name will help open doors.

also what about going the md-phd route? it might take an extra year [maybe two] to graduate but you can have your schooling paid for and again be in a real competitive spot when it comes residency time.
 

mosoriire

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I'm not sure about the md-phd route. Isnt that 3 - 4 extra years instead of 1 -2?...If I'm wrong, maybe I should start looking that way...

Just to weigh in a bit on the discussion: IMHO I think it depends on what you want to do in the future, and if your MS will be directly related to that. For instance, if you were doing an MS in statistics or some sort of Engineering or tropical diseases, and you intend to go the academic route in that area in the future, the MS can definitely help, especially if you did research along the way.

On the other hand, if your MS is more generaly and less research intensive, and you arent too sure what direction you will take in the future (ie, you are very open to whatever the future may hold), shelving the MS may not bear any sig opportunity costs.
 

NE_Cornhusker1

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Originally posted by mosoriire
I'm not sure about the md-phd route. Isnt that 3 - 4 extra years instead of 1 -2?...If I'm wrong, maybe I should start looking that way...

the one to two years was with the ms degree [in a relevant area to medicine (biochem, molecular bio, physiology, etc) in hand. one year of the extra three to four years will consist mostly of 'normal' classwork. the next couple of years will be benchtop research one of which has likely been completed in pursuing the ms.
 

NRAI2001

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Originally posted by NE_Cornhusker1
the one to two years was with the ms degree [in a relevant area to medicine (biochem, molecular bio, physiology, etc) in hand. one year of the extra three to four years will consist mostly of 'normal' classwork. the next couple of years will be benchtop research one of which has likely been completed in pursuing the ms.

So the work u do will getting ur MS can be used towards getting a phd?
 

tbo

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I'll put in my two pesetas here. The short answer is finish it up, unless it's truly prohibitive (ie. family emergency, finance).

I currently work at a big pharma (old school) and letters after your name get you much further than you'd expect. In the Master's program I'm in now 60% (if not more) are MDs. Now, the really non-scientific argument is ... well hell, if there was no benefit out of a masters after an MD, then none of them would be in the program. But as others have mentioned, it can only really help you.

You could argue that you have lots of coursework that you can show for. True, but dropping out of a program also shows another thing. My general philosophy is why give people a reason to raise a red flag at you if you can prevent it?
 

NRAI2001

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Originally posted by tbo
I'll put in my two pesetas here. The short answer is finish it up, unless it's truly prohibitive (ie. family emergency, finance).

I currently work at a big pharma (old school) and letters after your name get you much further than you'd expect. In the Master's program I'm in now 60% (if not more) are MDs. Now, the really non-scientific argument is ... well hell, if there was no benefit out of a masters after an MD, then none of them would be in the program. But as others have mentioned, it can only really help you.

You could argue that you have lots of coursework that you can show for. True, but dropping out of a program also shows another thing. My general philosophy is why give people a reason to raise a red flag at you if you can prevent it?

What if you are doing a MS programm specifically designed towards premeds, like the Georgetown programm. You will probably retake most of those classes once u get to med school again, so ur not really doing any extra course work or learning anything extra. Will this type of MS programm still look good?
 

tbo

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I still say you can't lose. An MS is an MS. 28, 58 (or however many) credits in program X is still 'nothing'.

Let me say, though, that it fully depends on the goal. If the goal is to practice medicine and be merry, well then hell, the MS means little. My take on this particular case is that it has the potential to be used in the future, so why not (again, barring the family emergency, finance issues)

To answer your above question, yes... in many instances your Master's works counts towards a PhD. Receiving an MS is a milestone, that one can choose to pickup later. An unfinished program isn't.

Again, just my two cents
 

NRAI2001

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Does ur undergrad major, undergrad school, or undergrad gpa matter when applying to residencies?
 

BerkeleyPremed

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No, your ugrad major, ugrad school, or ugrad GPA do NOT matter in applying to residencies.
 
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