Would it be a bad idea to disclose my sexuality during interviews?

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oralcare123

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I think you are misunderstanding what people are saying---it isn't homophobia at all---it is "it doesn't matter who you have sex with"....it's not something that needs to be discussed in an interview--not only is it illegal for them to ASK, but it's also illegal for them to make a decision based on sexual preference. The point you missed was, "it doesn't matter". As for the struggle, I am sure it was a difficult time, but it's not up there with going through chemo your sophomore year or dealing with the death of a parent or whatever. It's just not something that needs to be addressed in an interview, period.
Yes, it is illegal, but her sexual preferences would not be the official reason for the rejection - we all know that
 

oralcare123

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I've been posting since the beginning, if you've been reading. It's being drawn into a larger more aggravated debate---you didn't start the downward spiral in tone, but you're jumping on the bandwagon and steering into a ditch. No need to respond to a civilly posed question about how to talk about something with comments like: nobody cares, can't satisfy you people, nobody gives a damn, and here's my advice on how to be treated equally.

I should know better than to think I could improve the tone. People want to argue about these things, inevitably.
But it is impossible to satisfy people. They are looking for a special treatment and equality at the same time
That is why I've written to just say depression, because this is what everyone else would say and not mention the reason. Does adcom need to know, that I am depressed because I have pimples on my butt? No
 

Scumbag_Steve

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@Golfah Unfortunately, your opinion and mine, aren't really what matter here. Caution is what matters. I don't agree with the tone of a lot of the stuff said before me, but the fact of the matter is you have a choice to make, a choice that you shouldn't have to make but have to nonetheless. Do you play it safe, not knowing the background of the person who will be interviewing you, or do you risk offending a prejudiced person who has your future in their hands? While it sucks that a lot of times we need to cater to the lowest common denominator, if I were in the same situation you are in right now that's exactly what I'd do. If you have strong enough convictions about disclosing it during your interview that you're willing to accept the possible negative consequences, i.e. a rejection, in order to stand up for what you believe in, that's your choice, and more power to you. If you're not, I would play it safe. At the end of the day a bunch of strangers on the internet can't make that choice; it's yours.

I wish you the best of luck with applying do dental school and hope everything works out for you, and I'm happy you're doing better now in your personal life than you were before.
 
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arkenstone

But it is impossible to satisfy people. They are looking for a special treatment and equality at the same time
That is why I've written to just say depression, because this is what everyone else would say and not mention the reason. Does adcom need to know, that I am depressed because I have pimples on my butt? No
I don't think our perspectives differ too wildly. I was with my 6 year old and 4 year old nephews walking around a metropolitan area recently, and we stumbled upon a gay parade. (The day after the supreme court decision.) It was amusing until they started putting "Marriage, it's so gay" stickers on my nephews, giving them "I <3 Buns" bracelets, and me having to explain why we were shuffling by a few people with their butt cracks hanging out. And there is some credence to the special treatment / equality paradox you're talking about. But we should avoid the temptation to let our acquired immunities of similar topics bleed into a much smaller discussion.

I agree that restraint is better here, but sometimes just saying "depression" is weak sauce compared to giving underlying reasons for that depression. Depression is real--I've been in counseling and on drugs--but anyone can say it. I had a really bad semester once (1.6 bad), and I'm fortunate that I've got understandable reasons I can share, which helps my story and makes me feel understood. Telling OP 'nobody cares' for seeking the same thing isn't right.

Look, this is all internet mode. None of us would act this way if we were talking in person.
 

oralcare123

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I don't think our perspectives differ too wildly. I was with my 6 year old and 4 year old nephews walking around a metropolitan area recently, and we stumbled upon a gay parade. (The day after the supreme court decision.) It was amusing until they started putting "Marriage, it's so gay" stickers on my nephews, giving them "I <3 Buns" bracelets, and me having to explain why we were shuffling by a few people with their butt cracks hanging out. And there is some credence to the special treatment / equality paradox you're talking about. But we should avoid the temptation to let our acquired immunities of similar topics bleed into a much smaller discussion.

I agree that restraint is better here, but sometimes just saying "depression" is weak sauce compared to giving underlying reasons for that depression. Depression is real--I've been in counseling and on drugs--but anyone can say it. I had a really bad semester once (1.6 bad), and I'm fortunate that I've got understandable reasons I can share, which helps my story and makes me feel understood. Telling OP 'nobody cares' for seeking the same thing isn't right.

Look, this is all internet mode. None of us would act this way if we were talking in person.
I am afraid, if we were discussing the subject in person - hair would fly off and more then one nose would be broken, because we are adults with strong opinions. I think my attitude is reasonable, I even have a gay friend, but I do not understand crack/boobs hanging parades. A lot of straight people enjoy oral and anal, but we do not showcase our genitalia.
Back to the subject. I would not even mention depression, because this condition has a tendency to be chronic and come back. This means, that she may have it while in the dental school and would not be a "good" student schools are looking for. The fact, that her grades went down, show, that they may go down again.Stigma of the mental illness is still alive. It may be wise to just say, that she had health problems, but is fine now. They are not allowed to inquire further. Or just wave the rainbow flag
 
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SXCoronado

Anyway, going back to my original concern, I am probably going to have two answers ready: one that's vague and one that briefly explains my personal experience. I think I'm going to have to feel out how the interview is going and see if I feel comfortable enough to share few personal details about myself with the adcom. I would love to mention it every time they ask me about my grades because I would be showing my true self and I could talk about how that's changed me as a person and how that can help me become a great dentist etc, but obviously we don't live in world where everyone is understanding and caring.

I'm also glad there is now dialogue about this... although not a pretty one lol. It's important to think about for future LGBTQ members who want to be dentists. :horns::xf:
adcoms are not going to want to know about your sex life, straight/gay/anything else, in general.. I think you'll find a short answer about being depressed is more relevant to how it affected your work ethic anyway

Good luck! :)
 

LizLemongrab

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I'm going to tell you what I tell others typically by PM: dental schools want to see people who can gain insights from self-reflection such that they learn to be more compassionate and empathetic towards others. A lot of people with dental issues feel intense SHAME. Not being able to accept yourself is rooted in shame. Hopefully, the experience of finding yourself has taught you something that you can convey to adcoms maybe without the specifics if you don't feel comfortable.

I personally let it all hang out. Sure I only got one interview offer but I got one acceptance and the faculty at my school look out for me, know my name, my daughter's name, my husband's name, and send stuff my way if they think it'll help me out all the time. I'm not telling you to do it with the hope of goodies, but I think if you are open about who you are, there is a school that wants you just the way you are and will do what they can to help you out.
 

LizLemongrab

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They really shouldn't ask in the first place and people should disclose only what they feel comfortable with. Contrary to what some believe, it isn't just about "diversity on campus" for the sake of stamp collecting and looking good. Apparently some literature out there says that if you put a bunch of geniuses in a group, they won't necessarily outperform the other groups full of regular folks. The thing that makes groups succeed is effective communication and collaboration. I really shouldn't have to say this but having a diverse student body provides more perspectives which can lead to new insights or approaches to problem solving that are often inspired by our own life experiences.
 
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Golfah

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They really shouldn't ask in the first place and people should disclose only what they feel comfortable with. Contrary to what some believe, it isn't just about "diversity on campus" for the sake of stamp collecting and looking good. Apparently some literature out there says that if you put a bunch of geniuses in a group, they won't necessarily outperform the other groups full of regular folks. The thing that makes groups succeed is effective communication and collaboration. I really shouldn't have to say this but having a diverse student body provides more perspectives which can lead to new insights or approaches to problem solving that are often inspired by our own life experiences.
That person is ignorant. Ignore him/her. (the person who said f the diversity)
 

PlasmaMembrane

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How can this sound wrong to adcoms? It sounds great.
I disagree. Outside the obvious issue of you evaluating your own presentation, when I read what you wrote in combination with this mess:

"Throughout my first 2 years, I was really trying to find myself and come to terms with my identity. Nothing was making sense to me anymore and I felt like I've betrayed God's trust- which was extremely hard because it was something that got me through my hardships growing up. It took me years to finally accept it, but throughout that process, I really hated myself. I remember that I was telling myself that I didn't deserve my scholarships or any of the good things my school offered, and I became depressed for a while. But now that I look back, I think I am one of the lucky ones to have had a great suporrt system, especially coming from where I am from, to help me through with it. I just couldn't take it anymore that semester so I just stopped everything to really reflect and think about what I've been saying to myself."
You just come across as someone with a lot of emotional baggage that you're still holding onto. It's not even about your sexuality, it's the fact that you've made it a focal part of your identity when it truly has limited place at best in the pursuit of this profession and comes across more as a crutch you're leaning on to explain away past poor performance.
 
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Golfah

Golfah

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The reason for my post is to figure out the best way to phrase a changing point in my lifetime that caused some issues in my academic performance.

If the performance issue comes up, then I'll be honest. If it doesn't, I probably won't mention that I was going through an identity crisis. They will most likely ask things like, why do you want to be a dentist, tell me about yourself, what are your hobbies, what did you learn from your shadowing experiences etc.

I tend to write and say things with emotions and no filter because I'm all about feelings and straightforwardness. Hence my post. I want to sound confident, honest and professional without being too much.

Nothing is an excuse, but there can be reasons. I think that goes without saying. Nobody is going to excuse my 'bad' performance, but I have to be ready to explain myself.

Can people be nicer to me and actually read and think about what I'm saying before replying?
 
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Golfah

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Please lock this thread, moderators.

If someone can ask for me, I would be grateful. I don't know how to/am new to SDN.
 

SenoritaKorea

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I'm personally pretty shocked at the comments I'm reading on this thread. There's a big difference between offering guidance from another perspective. And if you want to be a little blunt about it, sure--if that's your style. The OP did knowingly open herself to scrutiny of internet trolls (though, who would have guessed so many would be on a healthcare forum where we're supposed to be supportive/constructively critical of each other). But making certain comments about homogenizing the dental professional population at the cost of keeping under-represented populations out is almost unethical. Please understand that 100% of us worked hard to be in a place where we are competitive for dental schools, but some did have to stretch themselves slightly further than others--and that needs to be honored and respected. The disadvantaged status portion of all of our applications exists for this reason.

Everyone certainly has their right to their opinions, and if flagrant homosexuality is not your flavor, that's fine. I work near the Castro in San Francisco, it's not always my cup of tea, either. However, as a healthcare professional, you're going to have to leave your biases/opinions/comfort zone at the freaking door. Some people are going to be extremely open about where they stick their penises, and you need to treat them with the same integrity you should treat your patients from your definition of a more palatable lifestyle.

And for the record, the discrimination, hate (which some of you have so clearly demonstrated on this thread), and fear of violence for being who you are boils down to MUCH more than, "Where" you choose to, "stick your penis." Disgraceful.
 

oralcare123

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That person is ignorant. Ignore him/her. (the person who said f the diversity)
As I understand, people in US want equality, to be treated the same as everyone else. Do you think people who agree with that are ignorant? I do not want to answer questions about my race and I do not want to know about people's sexual preferences, because those are not the qualities people suppose to be judged by. Or you think for the sake of the diversity adcoms should bring to the campuses child molesters and high school dropouts? I do not want this kind of diversity.
All I hear from gays, that they want to be treated like normal people, but you want to be treated like some kind of saint or a genius. There is nothing especially heroic in your experience, after all times changed. Gays are no longer placed in an asylum or prison. You went through some problematic times, I assume from what you disclosed, that you are from the religious family, it is understandable, but does not give you any advantage
Now assume someone very tolerable in the beginning just like me got really pissed by what you said on the interview. All the best
 

SenoritaKorea

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But it is impossible to satisfy people. They are looking for a special treatment and equality at the same time
That is why I've written to just say depression, because this is what everyone else would say and not mention the reason. Does adcom need to know, that I am depressed because I have pimples on my butt? No
Equal treatment is not the same as equitable treatment.
 

oralcare123

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I'm personally pretty shocked at the comments I'm reading on this thread. There's a big difference between offering guidance from another perspective. And if you want to be a little blunt about it, sure--if that's your style. The OP did knowingly open herself to scrutiny of internet trolls (though, who would have guessed so many would be on a healthcare forum where we're supposed to be supportive/constructively critical of each other). But making certain comments about homogenizing the dental professional population at the cost of keeping under-represented populations out is almost unethical. Please understand that 100% of us worked hard to be in a place where we are competitive for dental schools, but some did have to stretch themselves slightly further than others--and that needs to be honored and respected. The disadvantaged status portion of all of our applications exists for this reason.

Everyone certainly has their right to their opinions, and if flagrant homosexuality is not your flavor, that's fine. I work near the Castro in San Francisco, it's not always my cup of tea, either. However, as a healthcare professional, you're going to have to leave your biases/opinions/comfort zone at the freaking door. Some people are going to be extremely open about where they stick their penises, and you need to treat them with the same integrity you should treat your patients from your definition of a more palatable lifestyle.

And for the record, the discrimination, hate (which some of you have so clearly demonstrated on this thread), and fear of violence for being who you are boils down to MUCH more than, "Where" you choose to, "stick your penis." Disgraceful.
This is a public forum and we are pretty civil. Gave a lot of good advise, until some from another side started calling others homophobes, just for saying that sexual preferences are TMI for the adcom
And for God's sake read the definition of the discrimination
 

SenoritaKorea

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As I understand, people in US want equality, to be treated the same as everyone else. Do you think people who agree with that are ignorant? I do not want to answer questions about my race and I do not want to know about people's sexual preferences, because those are not the qualities people suppose to be judged by. Or you think for the sake of the diversity adcoms should bring to the campuses child molesters and high school dropouts? I do not want this kind of diversity.
All I hear from gays, that they want to be treated like normal people, but you want to be treated like some kind of saint or a genius. There is nothing especially heroic in your experience, after all times changed. Gays are no longer placed in an asylum or prison. You went through some problematic times, I assume from what you disclosed, that you are from the religious family, it is understandable, but does not give you any advantage
Now assume someone very tolerable in the beginning just like me got really pissed by what you said on the interview. All the best
This is why a social justice curriculum should be taught in all professional healthcare schools.

To address why we do not allow child molesters into dental school: Pretty sure that's a felony. While it's possible to get into dental school with a felony charge, I think the likelihood of hearing back from the adcoms would be low. As far as high school dropouts: Bro. You need an undergrad degree to apply. Moot points, here. And say you were to run into a child molester during your time as a doctor--do you deny them care because they did something like that? Do they not deserve care? Even if we went back to the practice of institutionalizing "sexual deviants," I guarantee you SOMEBODY would need to be taking care of them.

And times have certainly not changed for people like you who think that not effectually imprisoning homosexuals is considered, "progress." You clearly have many more definitions to pursue than I do.
 
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SenoritaKorea

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This is a public forum and we are pretty civil. Gave a lot of good advise, until some from another side started calling others homophobes, just for saying that sexual preferences are TMI for the adcom
And for God's sake read the definition of the discrimination
I taught urban school for 3 years. I'm very well-versed in discrimination of all flavors. Go get some life experience and then sign up from a public service like dental medicine.
 
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oralcare123

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This is why a social justice curriculum should be taught in all professional healthcare schools.

To address why we do not allow child molesters into dental school: Pretty sure that's a felony. While it's possible to get into dental school with a felony charge, I think the likelihood of hearing back from the adcoms would be low. As far as high school dropouts: Bro. You need an undergrad degree to apply. Moot points, here. And say you were to run into a child molester during your time as a doctor--do you deny them care because they did something like that? Do they not deserve care? Even if we went back to the practice of institutionalizing "sexual deviants," I guarantee you SOMEBODY would need to be taking care of them.

And times have clearly not changed for people like you who think that not effectually imprisoning homosexuals is considered, "progress." You clearly have many more definitions to pursue than I do.
You clearly missed the point
 
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I do not want to answer questions about my race and I do not want to know about people's sexual preferences, because those are not the qualities people suppose to be judged by. Or you think for the sake of the diversity adcoms should bring to the campuses child molesters and high school dropouts? I do not want this kind of diversity.
Ah, the old slippery slope child molester argument. Classic.

Because clearly a romantic relationship between two consenting adults of the same gender is just one step away from "Hi, I'll be your dentist and child molester today; let's fill those cavities."
 

oralcare123

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You guy are completely missing the point. Can you think logically? I will say it differently. In your opinion the preference for admission should be given to people with a low GPA and developmental abnormalities, just for the sake of diversity?
 

SenoritaKorea

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You guy are completely missing the point. Can you think logically? I will say it differently. In your opinion the preference for admission should be given to people with a low GPA and developmental abnormalities, just for the sake of diversity?
"Developmental abnormalities?" Are you not reading your other'ing language?
And preferences are not being given to applicants with 2.8 GPA's and 17 DAT scores. Students granted admission may have weak points in their applications, and the PS/disadvantaged sections give them a chance to address these singular shortcomings (as in the OP's stunted performance during one year/semester of her undergrad). Believe me, nobody is getting into school by merit of their disadvantages alone.
 

allantois

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You guy are completely missing the point. Can you think logically? I will say it differently. In your opinion the preference for admission should be given to people with a low GPA and developmental abnormalities, just for the sake of diversity?
I dare you to flatter your internalized bigotry on your interviews. I guess some people are blessed for not seeing their ignorance. I don't know if you are applying to medical school, but physicians in academia are some of the most liberal.

I will spell it out one time only:
Disclosing a mental illness (depression) can only hurt one's application. It is a protected information for a reason.
Coming from a diverse background is highly valued in US admissions (perhaps not so much in dental school as it is in medical school); it is too sad that you in your hateful mind cannot see the difference between a mental illness and struggles that come with being a member of a marginalized group. Instead, you go on giving the OP flat out bad advice in this thread.
 
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Golfah

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As I understand, people in US want equality, to be treated the same as everyone else. Do you think people who agree with that are ignorant? I do not want to answer questions about my race and I do not want to know about people's sexual preferences, because those are not the qualities people suppose to be judged by. Or you think for the sake of the diversity adcoms should bring to the campuses child molesters and high school dropouts? I do not want this kind of diversity.
All I hear from gays, that they want to be treated like normal people, but you want to be treated like some kind of saint or a genius. There is nothing especially heroic in your experience, after all times changed. Gays are no longer placed in an asylum or prison. You went through some problematic times, I assume from what you disclosed, that you are from the religious family, it is understandable, but does not give you any advantage
Now assume someone very tolerable in the beginning just like me got really pissed by what you said on the interview. All the best
I'm not seeking some kind of special treatment at all. Like I said, I never mentioned anything about my sexual orientation in my application even though it's a big part of my identity.

I agree, nothing heroic about my experience. That doesn't mean my feelings were not valid.

I think you're ignorant because of all the comments you've made and the words you've used. I am not going to go through this thread to list them. Previous posts have highlighted them.

I hope to God nobody gets their 'qualities' judged by their race or sexual orientation for dental school. Diversity is there because they want people from all kinds of backgrounds and experiences. It creates a good learning environment for students.

They don't actively look or make exceptions for people of different backgrounds with solely low GPAs and low DAT scores... what world is that?

All you hear from gays is that they "want to be treated like normal people." I have actually never heard any of my gay friends, including myself, say that. I hear a lot more. Get to know them.
 
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LizLemongrab

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I dare you to flatter your internalized bigotry on your interviews. I guess some people are blessed for not seeing their ignorance. I don't know if you are applying to medical school, but physicians in academia are some of the most liberal.

I will spell it out one time only:
Disclosing a mental illness (depression) can only hurt one's application. It is a protected information for a reason.
Coming from a diverse background is highly valued in US admissions (perhaps not so much in dental school as it is in medical school); it is too sad that you in your hateful mind cannot see the difference between a mental illness and struggles that come with being a member of a marginalized group. Instead, you go on giving the OP flat out bad advice in this thread.
I guess some people are still living pre-DSM II ;)
The magical thing about privilege is that it is a huge privilege to be unaware of both privilege and oppression because there isn't any oppression you experience that would make you think for a moment about the unpleasant experiences of other people because if you had any heart, you'd at least feel bad for them even if you choose to do nothing.

But no, do carry on judging peoples' aesthetic expressions of their culture. It isn't as if parade attire is the same as daily attire. You know, because my homosexual classmates wear a uniform of glitter, campy getups, and vogue their way down the halls together with a boombox blasting Cher or Madonna so we know exactly who they are. Oh no, I feel oppressed when marginalized groups dare to express their identity in a way that I find visually offensive because of my own prurience and ideas of sexual propriety!

Also, if a morally and ethically decrepit person had an amazing GPA/DAT score, they should be allowed in on the basis of "academic merit"? The people on here who focus extensively on quantitative merit don't sound like they have much qualitative merit.
 
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oralcare123

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"Developmental abnormalities?" Are you not reading your other'ing language?
And preferences are not being given to applicants with 2.8 GPA's and 17 DAT scores. Students granted admission may have weak points in their applications, and the PS/disadvantaged sections give them a chance to address these singular shortcomings (as in the OP's stunted performance during one year/semester of her undergrad). Believe me, nobody is getting into school by merit of their disadvantages alone.
Homosexuality is not a disadvantage any more
 
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oralcare123

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I dare you to flatter your internalized bigotry on your interviews. I guess some people are blessed for not seeing their ignorance. I don't know if you are applying to medical school, but physicians in academia are some of the most liberal.

I will spell it out one time only:
Disclosing a mental illness (depression) can only hurt one's application. It is a protected information for a reason.
Coming from a diverse background is highly valued in US admissions (perhaps not so much in dental school as it is in medical school); it is too sad that you in your hateful mind cannot see the difference between a mental illness and struggles that come with being a member of a marginalized group. Instead, you go on giving the OP flat out bad advice in this thread.
Homosexuality is not considered a mental illness any longer nor they are marginalized group. It is not a disadvantage in any way, they are just like any other normal person.
I think you are secretly hating homosexuals, that is why you are saying they are marginalized group. Shame on you
People should be admitted to schools based on their personal qualities and grades, not the color of their skin and sexual preferences.
I give a bad advise? Read more attentively. Depression is no longer as big of a problem as years before - third of the population suffers from it. There is no good explanation to her bad performance in a span of two years, other then say that those were "some health problem, which are resolved now" much better then sole searching, in my opinion
 
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oralcare123

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I'm not seeking some kind of special treatment at all. Like I said, I never mentioned anything about my sexual orientation in my application even though it's a big part of my identity.

I agree, nothing heroic about my experience. That doesn't mean my feelings were not valid.

I think you're ignorant because of all the comments you've made and the words you've used. I am not going to go through this thread to list them. Previous posts have highlighted them.

I hope to God nobody gets their 'qualities' judged by their race or sexual orientation for dental school. Diversity is there because they want people from all kinds of backgrounds and experiences. It creates a good learning environment for students.

They don't actively look or make exceptions for people of different backgrounds with solely low GPAs and low DAT scores... what world is that?

All you hear from gays is that they "want to be treated like normal people." I have actually never heard any of my gay friends, including myself, say that. I hear a lot more. Get to know them.
Look. I do not have any problems with homosexuality, other then sometimes my eyebrows are raised, when I see images of gay parade with naked people.
We obviously have different gay friends, mine said that they do not like attitude of gay on those parades too, because parade is not about partying or being naked, it is to remember a gay person, who died on that day many years ago. Why don't you want to be treated like everybody else? What is wrong with that?
I have strong opinions, I agree, but would not apologize for them. My opinions are within democratic values, I am not ashamed of them.
I cautioned you from disclosing too much, because this is my opinion and you asked for it. Was I rude? I do not think so. We live in a society, where people are still divided in their attitude, members of the adcoms are older and might like what you said or might not. In my opinion, the possibility of them not liking is much higher. I really do not want you to risk admission in order to make a point. You can make it after admission
 
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LizLemongrab

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I don't think our perspectives differ too wildly. I was with my 6 year old and 4 year old nephews walking around a metropolitan area recently, and we stumbled upon a gay parade. (The day after the supreme court decision.) It was amusing until they started putting "Marriage, it's so gay" stickers on my nephews, giving them "I <3 Buns" bracelets, and me having to explain why we were shuffling by a few people with their butt cracks hanging out.
Look. I do not have any problems with homosexuality, other then sometimes my eyebrows are raised, when I see images of gay parade with naked people.
TL;DR: parades + butts/exposed skin + stickers = homosexuals.
Sounds like my kind of people.
 

touchpause13

nolite te bastardes carborundorum
5+ Year Member
Jun 25, 2012
14,430
14,026
The North
Still not a disadvantage, because unless you choose to shove it in others faces, no one would know. It is not as obvious as a missing limb
I don't have a problem with straights. I just don't want them shoving their nasty straight-ness in my face you know?

Like have you ever been to a st. Paddy's day parade. Gross straight people making out everywhere. No one cares that you like to put your penises in vaginas, just keep that ish away from me! And romatic comedies? Sick. I get it, you're straight. Barf. Can you believe this guy at school told me a story about his girlfriend the other day? His girlfriend! Like keep your breeder life away from me, man. I don't want to here about how you went to a restaurant, in public, with children around. Ugh. It's like they want to involve their friends and family in their lives like complete human beings. Ugh. Whatever, Chad, I don't want to hear about the risotto Melissa made you last night. I bet that's a euphemism about straight sex! Gross!
 
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