Would you personally use a PA as your PCP?

  • Yes

    Votes: 40 20.7%
  • No I'd want a MD or DO

    Votes: 123 63.7%
  • No I'd want an MD only

    Votes: 30 15.5%

  • Total voters
    193
May 14, 2016
91
113
I'm asking PURELY because I'm switching PCPs and have the option of either a PA who can see me in a week or a DO that I have to wait over a month to see.

I'm healthy now, but my concern is a PA might miss something subtle which might lead to late diagnosis of some illness I develop in the future.

THIS IS NOT MEANT TO STIR UP ANY MD VS DO VS PA DEBATE. Answer purely from your personal perspective. Would you personally trust a PA with your health?
 

Goro

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For what it's worth, I had a NP as my doctor for years. Wonderful lady.
 
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Goro

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Goro

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Don't take it personally.

And don't be threatened by midlevels either.


The fact that an educated person such as yourself who works in medical education used the terms interchangeably tells me everything.
 

DrBowtie

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Don't take it personally.

And don't be threatened by midlevels either.
I don't take it personally since title erosion has been going on for awhile. I'm sure your colleagues would be equally as annoyed if everyone referred to you as Instructor or better yet TA. Respect the physician title your students are earning.
 

DrBowtie

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I'm asking PURELY because I'm switching PCPs and have the option of either a PA who can see me in a week or a DO that I have to wait over a month to see.

I'm healthy now, but my concern is a PA might miss something subtle which might lead to late diagnosis of some illness I develop in the future.

THIS IS NOT MEANT TO STIR UP ANY MD VS DO VS PA DEBATE. Answer purely from your personal perspective. Would you personally trust a PA with your health?
It probably doesn't matter if you are healthy and just going in for a yearly physical. There isn't much value added there.
 
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DokterMom

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If you're young and healthy and have no reason to suspect anything nefarious, why not? But if I find a lump -- then I want an MD.
 
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Goro

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DrBowtie

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Goro

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It's OK. There have been times where it's been

Them: "So is that all, Mr Goro?
Me: [thinking][ "That's Dr Goro to you"

It will be OK, really.

We now return you to your regularly scheduled SDN thread.



Perhaps instead of getting snarky, you could just say you made a mistake and move on. Besides you used physician, not Doctor which have different meanings. Your NP could have been a DNP, but they aren't a physician.
 

Azete

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I see a PA for ~90% of my care, but usually because the reason I'm going is already obvious -- as are most PC visits. It's cheaper for the same result. If I'm experiencing something I haven't experienced before, or I need some manipulation because med school ruined my posture (I see a DO), then I ask to see the physician.
 
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atomheart

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If you don't feel comfortable you should find someone else.

I told my wife not to let anyone but an anesthesiologist touch her for her epidural. Lo' and behold, two CRNAs were sent to manage her during labor. When the epidural was later unknowingly dislodged and she started feeling pain, the CRNAs just scratched their heads and kept pushing drug, even with the obvious pooling along her back. The anesthesiologist who we were handed off to later for c-section was fuming. There will not be another mlp touching any member of my family.

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WheezyBaby

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It's OK. There have been times where it's been

Them: "So is that all, Mr Goro?
Me: [thinking][ "That's Dr Goro to you"

It will be OK, really.

We now return you to your regularly scheduled SDN thread.
I'm not sure I'd call being concerned about a title and being concerned about a systematic encroachment of practice and obfuscation of provider training quite the same. When you have a major organization of masters level educators / researchers attempting to demonstrate that they're equal / better to doctoral level educators / researchers in those roles and they've made significant headway nationally in that regard, draw the parallel. Maybe let them toss in that the doctoral argument against them is just a money issue
 
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Goro

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True that.




I'm not sure I'd call being concerned about a title and being concerned about a systematic encroachment of practice and obfuscation of provider training quite the same. When you have a major organization of masters level educators / researchers attempting to demonstrate that they're equal / better to doctoral level educators / researchers in those roles and they've made significant headway nationally in that regard, draw the parallel
 
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Goro

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It's OK. There have been times where it's been

Them: "So is that all, Mr Goro?
Me: [thinking][ "That's Dr Goro to you"

It will be OK, really.

We now return you to your regularly scheduled SDN thread.
This comparison makes no sense. If you are a male, then calling you "Mr" is not factually incorrect, and is probably the title most people, who are not so insecure, prefer to go by in social situations/outside work. An NP is not a physician, so calling them that IS factually incorrect. In the future, you should try admitting you made a mistake when it is first pointed out and move on.
 

Goro

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Ok, mistakes were made. Mea culpa.

Feel better?

This comparison makes no sense. If you are a male, then calling you "Mr" is not factually incorrect, and is probably the title most people, who are not so insecure, prefer to go by in social situations/outside work. An NP is not a physician, so calling them that IS factually incorrect. In the future, you should try admitting you made a mistake when it is first pointed out and move on.
 
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ortnakas

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I'm young and healthy, so sure, no problem.

If I had something that needed to be diagnosed, or was pregnant, or had a chronic medical condition, I'd want to be seen by their supervising physician.
 

aProgDirector

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Derailing this track further, if you're (relatively) young and healthy, why do you need to see anyone at all?

Not that I'm against primary care -- nothing could be further from the truth. But the value of physicals for patients who are young and healthy is probably zero. If you have chronic health issues, then you need someone to manage them.
 

Darth Doc

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I'm asking PURELY because I'm switching PCPs and have the option of either a PA who can see me in a week or a DO that I have to wait over a month to see.
If they are in the same practice, you can always switch over to the DO at a later date or if you have a specific concern can request the DO. Depending on the state and the supervising physician, the DO should be reviewing the midlevel's charts.

I take my family to see the next available provider whether PA or MD for routine visits or simple illnesses I know the diagnoses for (UTI, URI, possible strep throat). If it's something else (that minute clinic wouldn't treat), I schedule with a MD every time.

However, you should never see a provider you aren't comfortable seeing. You'll always be second-guessing everything they say.
 

Azete

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Derailing this track further, if you're (relatively) young and healthy, why do you need to see anyone at all?

Not that I'm against primary care -- nothing could be further from the truth. But the value of physicals for patients who are young and healthy is probably zero. If you have chronic health issues, then you need someone to manage them.
I think it's important to get labs at least every couple years or so, chances are it won't ever reveal anything but it's a relatively cheap form of preventive care.

I also can't write myself antibiotics. Had rheumatic fever when I was 8 because my parents decided to let me "ride out" strep, so naturally I don't ever want to experience that again.
 
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astrostellar

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My childhood PCP was a NP and she was amazing, and my current PCPs in the military are PAs. One is a completely incompetent moron, and one is better than most doctors I've had.
 
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ChiTownBHawks

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PCP = primary care PHYSICIAN.

It's incredible how many intelligent people have been brain washed by the "provider" label. And we wonder how the lay gets confused. Holy ****.

So to answer your ******ed question: no I wouldn't feel comfortable with a np or pa as my primary care physician because they aren't one
 
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PCP = primary care PHYSICIAN.

It's incredible how many intelligent people have been brain washed by the "provider" label. And we wonder how the lay gets confused. Holy ****.

So to answer your ******ed question: no I wouldn't feel comfortable with a np or pa as my primary care physician because they aren't one
Primary care provider also = PCP FWIW


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Can we all just agree that MD>DO>PA so we can get back to seeing patients.
 

MehDO

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Can we all just agree that MD>DO>PA so we can get back to seeing patients.
I understand that when applying to medical school, MD > DO, but in the clinical setting, how is that true? Clinical medicine has a lot more depth and breadth than the whole MD vs DO argument.

smh...
 
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I understand that when applying to medical school, MD > DO, but in the clinical setting, how is that true? Clinical medicine has a lot more depth and breadth than the whole MD vs DO argument.

smh...
I couldn't agree more but in an effort to put this dead horse to bed, will you please go along with me?
 
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I can't tell if you are purposely being naive. Or if you are truly that obtuse. Either way. Enjoy the next few decades. I'm sure you'll make a wonderful employee of the suits.
It is used in both ways.


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TaroBubbleTea

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I'd want an MD or DO only.

I would feel uncomfortable with a mid level because in the back of my mind, I know I will always be second guessing their medical decision making. Personally, I'd rather avoid that uncomfortable situation altogether.
 
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I'd want an MD or DO only.

I would feel uncomfortable with a mid level because in the back of my mind, I know I will always be second guessing their medical decision making. Personally, I'd rather avoid that uncomfortable situation altogether.
After you've finished residency you may find yourself doing the same to MDs or DOs
 

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I don't understand why the Pro-NP people are basically saying, "If I think it might be actually serious, then I want to see an MD. If not, an NP will do."

Don't you think that part of the reason why you go to a physician is because you are not qualified to determine what's serious and what's not so serious?

Also, I think that physicians would do well to refer to "nurse practitioners" and the like simply as advanced nurses. That's what they are.
 
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One of the things you learn in MS and residency is that the history is overwhelmingly important in making a diagnosis. If your knowledge of pathology is limited then your differential diagnostic ability is also limited. Midlevels, particularly PAs often have limited knowledge of pathology. As a result it is less likely they would recognize when a "cold" is not a "cold." Having said that though the reality is that most of the time a "cold" is a "cold" so there is a role for midlevels.


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One of the things you learn in MS and residency is that the history is overwhelmingly important in making a diagnosis. If your knowledge of pathology is limited then your differential diagnostic ability is also limited. Midlevels, particularly PAs often have limited knowledge of pathology. As a result it is less likely they would recognize when a "cold" is not a "cold." Having said that though the reality is that most of the time a "cold" is a "cold" so there is a role for midlevels.
I challenge you to take a PANCE practice test.
 
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W19

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One of the things you learn in MS and residency is that the history is overwhelmingly important in making a diagnosis. If your knowledge of pathology is limited then your differential diagnostic ability is also limited. Midlevels, particularly PAs often have limited knowledge of pathology. As a result it is less likely they would recognize when a "cold" is not a "cold." Having said that though the reality is that most of the time a "cold" is a "cold" so there is a role for midlevels.


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Their knowledge of path is much more vast than NP...but I got your overall point.
 
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Their knowledge of path is much more vast than NP...but I got your overall point.
I haven't seen that except perhaps in the military trained PAs but it may vary by program idk. A lot of MDs don't use that knowledge either FWIW.


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Azete

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The focus really shouldn't be on the training differences, but rather how much of those differences are actually translated into practice. I imagine there wouldn't be much discernible difference between a PA with 20 years of experience in a particular specialty versus an MD with 20 years of experience in the same specialty.
 
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