jawicobike

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Why are there no OMT tech programs or combined PT/OMT programs? I’m not talking about the whole osteopathic philosophy I’m talking about OMT. Wouldn’t it make sense to have programs that teach only OMT and within a year you could receive some kind of OMT tech certificate that would allow you to practice OMT under a physician? Are there not OMT fellowships that are open to undergraduate students? Why not create a certificate for those people who want to do OMT but don’t want to go through the hassle of medical school?
 

kaikai128

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There are several testimonies as to the benefit of OMT, look around on here...there have been PLENTY of ppl to ask these questions in the past. Many ppl won't even feed this troll anymore--these quesstions have been asked and answered ad nauseum.

My thought on the certificate....I wouldn't let anyone near my spine that only has a "certificate." Heck no. I'm not particularly keen on seeing NPs or PAs, not a chance I would let someone with a one year certificate near me. I think that those who want to do OMT but not medical school would look into Chiropractic schools. I know, I know, it is not the same...but if it is really the manipulations only that they care about and not the rest of medicine--I suspect they would probably be more fulfilled there. I would guess that there would be opportunities for them to pick up extra skills in other forms of manipulation that are not traditionally taught in chiropractics if the student desired.
 
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jawicobike

jawicobike

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kaikai128 said:
My thought on the certificate....I wouldn't let anyone near my spine that only has a "certificate." Heck no. I'm not particularly keen on seeing NPs or PAs, not a chance I would let someone with a one year certificate near me. I think that those who want to do OMT but not medical school would look into Chiropractic schools. I know, I know, it is not the same...but if it is really the manipulations only that they care about and not the rest of medicine--I suspect they would probably be more fulfilled there. I would guess that there would be opportunities for them to pick up extra skills in other forms of manipulation that are not traditionally taught in chiropractics if the student desired.
I think a tech with a year of intesnive OMT training could do a much better job of treating SD than many of my classmates. That said, I'd rather my wife went to an OB than a nurse midwife to deliver her baby, but the nurse midwife still exists. From a business standpoint why are there no OMT techs? I think people would go see them because I believe OMT can be learned without going to medical school and these techs could probably charge less than DO's. I'm not trying to get into a war of words here I am actually curious as to why with so many technology schools all over the US for so many subspecialities none of these schools have a program that teaches OMT.
 

raptor5

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I would think as a physician what you could do is hire a DPT and teach them the techniques that they would use for REHAB ONLY. I think they would need to be a licensed a physician or DC to treat a complaint off the street. It probably is going to come down to liability issues more than what is legal or illegal. It is legal for an OMM specialist to perform a CABG or brain surgery but no feasible b/c of lack of training and liability issues.

I would rather not have a tech performing HVLA on my spine but that's me. Everything else though is fair game, but I am healthy. There are many contraindications for OMT and for what techniques to use in various disease states.
 

deejayshakur

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jawicobike said:
I think a tech with a year of intesnive OMT training could do a much better job of treating SD than many of my classmates. That said, I'd rather my wife went to an OB than a nurse midwife to deliver her baby, but the nurse midwife still exists. From a business standpoint why are there no OMT techs? I think people would go see them because I believe OMT can be learned without going to medical school and these techs could probably charge less than DO's. I'm not trying to get into a war of words here I am actually curious as to why with so many technology schools all over the US for so many subspecialities none of these schools have a program that teaches OMT.
my guess, as an incoming and naive osmI, is that this decision is largely under the jurisdiction of the AOA. even OMT techs would be governed by the AOA; i don't see techs practicing independently.

with DO representation at around 5% of all physicians, yea, it would make sense to spread OMT via techs. on the other hand, it could also begin the dilution process of osteopathic medicine in the form of midlevel pracitioners, which is what we see with allopathic medicine. i don't use 'dilution' in a disparaging sense, but in a more practical sense. MDs have passed on some primary care jobs to PAs and NPs so that they can tend to the higher acuity cases. i suspect that once DOs reach a peak case load, if you will, then the delegation of lower acuity cases (not that OMM is low in acuity) will be dealt with accordingly. but i don't see the AOA letting go anytime soon.

ok, now somebody tear that apart.
 

OSUdoc08

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jawicobike said:
Why are there no OMT tech programs or combined PT/OMT programs? I’m not talking about the whole osteopathic philosophy I’m talking about OMT. Wouldn’t it make sense to have programs that teach only OMT and within a year you could receive some kind of OMT tech certificate that would allow you to practice OMT under a physician? Are there not OMT fellowships that are open to undergraduate students? Why not create a certificate for those people who want to do OMT but don’t want to go through the hassle of medical school?
I think the whole point is that certain courses such as gross anatomy, neuroanatomy, medical physiology, and others are needed in order to practice OMM at a full and safe capacity. Allowing people to practice OMM without this background knowledge could do more harm than good.
 

DrMom

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I have family members who have gone to PTs and basically gotten OMT (myofascial, muscle energy, and cranialsacral). OMT and PT methods have a lot of overlap anyways, but some PTs get additional training in OMT methods.
 

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DrMom said:
I have family members who have gone to PTs and basically gotten OMT (myofascial, muscle energy, and cranialsacral). OMT and PT methods have a lot of overlap anyways, but some PTs get additional training in OMT methods.
Fortunately Physical Therapists have master's degrees, and MPT programs require courses in human anatomy and neuroscience, though of course not to the same extent.
 

docbill

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DrMom said:
I have family members who have gone to PTs and basically gotten OMT (myofascial, muscle energy, and cranialsacral). OMT and PT methods have a lot of overlap anyways, but some PTs get additional training in OMT methods.
The Canadian School of Osteopathy teaches OMT to graduates of MD schools, Nursing, Dentistry, Naturopathy, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, Athletic Therapy, or Chiropractic.

But they must be in good standing and hold an up-to-date licence, registration or certificate in a medical or manual therapy based practice.

http://www.osteopathy-canada.com/
 

Dr JPH

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First of all, manual medicine has been practiced throughout the world for hundreds of years (at least) by all different types of practitioners. DOs came along and tried to claim a little piece of this and call it "Osteopathic Manipulation". Total nonsense.

Do you know what percentage of "OMT" was actually developed by DOs? Not as much as you think. Where else did we get it? Europe, Australia, PTs, Chiros (yes, its true).

Do you know how much "OMT" actually approaches a patient in a true "osteopathic" way? Not much.

So to say that OMT should not be taught to non-DOs is ridiculous...first of all because it already IS being taught to other disciplines and secondly the field of osteopathic medicine has claim to little manual medicine...we just happen to use it (some of us....and many of us very poorly).

To have an "OMT Tech" type training is ridiculous...we cant even get more than 22% of our graduates from DO schools to use OMT. A person wanting to learn manual medicine but is unwilling to dedicate the time to go to medical school should seek a Physical Therapy license and then take additional manual therapy classes.
 

DragonWell

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I posted something about this before, must have gotten lost...

The splitting of OMT from DO med schools seems to have already begun taking place...Check out the Osteopathic Health and Wellness Institute
http://www.ohwi.org/1.htm

As an LMP who uses many techniques born of osteopathy in his practice, I'm all for the sharing of knowledge and techniques. However, it doesn't seem helpful to Osteopathic Medicine to have a "certificate in Osteopathy" running around...such confusion has long been a thorn in the side of Naturopathic Medicine. It's hard to take a profession seriously when in some states the initials ND mean a four year grad degree, in others a 6 week correspondence course.
Is this legal - to offer a certificate in osteopathy, a practice which already has requirements for licensure?


From the web site (my boldface)
" Mission Statement
The mission of the Osteopathic Health & Wellness Institute is to provide the highest quality education and treatment utilizing osteopathic principles and practice while promoting a forum for the continued advancement of osteopathic thought.
This mission is accomplished by providing education and treatment in our facilities in Wilmington, Delaware in the United States, and through our International Diplomate and Certificate Programs in Osteopathy offered in the United States, Canada, England, Italy, Finland, Switzerland, China, and South Korea. OHWI also teaches and promotes osteopathy in osteopathic and allopathic schools throughout the United States and abroad.

Among the many manipulative therapy courses taught by OHWI are:
l Craniosacral Manipulative Therapy
l Visceral Manipulative Therapy
l Myofascial Release Technique
l Facilitated Positional Release
l Functional Technique
l Lymphatic Activation
l Muscle Energy Technique
l Counterstrain Technique
l Osteoarticular Technique

Osteopathic Health & Wellness Institute, Osteopathy, Craniosacral Therapy, and Manipulative Therapy Education

In addition to the courses mentioned, OHWI sponsors internships offering students from around the world one-on-one, hands-on osteopathic training in a clinical setting. We also sponsor study groups, allowing healthcare practitioners an enlightened and nurturing environment to further enhance their abilities as healers."