Lunasly

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2010
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Canada
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Hey guys,

Been searching some threads and have not found a specific answer to my question. I am hoping some you that are more experienced can help me out here.

Right now I have planned out my courses so that I can finish all of my pre-reqs by the beginning of summer of my sophomore year. This leaves me with the summer to study and write the MCAT (I am from Canada). This reason for this is that everything will be fresh in my mind. I would of just finished a year of organic, a year of cell biology, a year of physics and only a year before that the rest of the pre-reqs (i.e. English, general chem and bio). However I do not plan to apply in the summer of my sophomore year as I would have horrible EC's and I have no idea what my grades will be like.

I am not rushing into anything, I am thinking of doing it because if I do get a low MCAT score the first time, at least I can rewrite in the summer of my third year and still be on track because if I get a low MCAT in the summer of my junior year, I will be in school for another 2 years! On the other hand, if I do well on the MCAT in my 2nd year, I will apply very early third year where my EC's should be looking good and I will be in med school and I would of completed my major and minor.

What are your views on this?
 

afugazzi

5+ Year Member
May 8, 2009
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Good plan. Taking it over the summer gives you plenty of time to study and then you can always take it again if it doesn't go well.
 

Snuke

5+ Year Member
Apr 17, 2010
943
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That's exactly what I did. As long as you are prepared for probably the worst summer of your life, go for it. There were weeks on top of weeks where all I did was either study for the MCAT or study for Physics II, eat, and sleep. That's it. Zero exaggeration. I even studied 4 or more hours a day while with my family on vacation and took practice MCATs.

The worst summer - EVER. But that 34S made up for it.

The other upside? I don't have to try to study for my MCAT while taking a full load of classes, and if I had not done well I could have retaken.

Good luck
 
OP
Lunasly

Lunasly

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2010
798
28
Canada
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Hey guys, thanks for the advice so far. It feels like I am in a rush, but I am not trying to be.
 
OP
Lunasly

Lunasly

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2010
798
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But if I study for 3 months, shouldnt I still write it even if I do not feel fully prepared. It will really be my only chance to write the MCAT while a lot of the stuff is still fresh in my mind.
 

Parallaxal

ETB Tapped
Aug 27, 2010
23
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I actually thought the exact same as you. I took the MCAT in August of the summer between 2nd and 3rd year, and it definitely felt like everything on the test was fresh in my mind, having just taken every lower-division class that was relevant to it.

One thing that does worry me a bit, though, is that because I took the MCAT so early, if I don't get in on this application cycle, I'm going to have to retake it because my score is already close to expiring.
 
OP
Lunasly

Lunasly

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2010
798
28
Canada
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Yeah I actually just realised that after reading another topic. I think its worth it, though. :)

Thanks!
 

Catalystik

The Gimlet Eye
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Sep 4, 2006
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While studying, you should also be taking multiple practice tests. If you are not reliably scoring in your target zone then cancel the test and put in more study time/consider a formal classroom prep course/follow the stickied plan for study in the MCAT Discussions Forum. Don't take the test "just to get a feel for it."

Schools vary in when they expire an MCAT score. It's two years for a number of them, three years for many, and 4-10 years for some.
 
Sep 27, 2010
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Dental Student
That is exactly what I did. I took three months to study and ended up with a 36 . I'm very happy I took it early because i don't have the stress of studying for the mcat while taking classes like everyone else. It is also a good feeling to know how competitive you are with your mcat before beginning applications. Good luck!
 
Sep 29, 2009
1,054
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Cleveland
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Medical Student
I did the summer study thing too. In the end, 3 months of 100% dedication to studying was preferable to 6 months of halfhearted studying while still balancing my courses.

Only drawback? I was 20 when I took the MCAT so I didn't get to go out to the bars and celebrate being done :(