WWAMI: does the length you have been residing in the state count in your application?

lockedinphdjail

Full Member
May 21, 2020
13
2
26
  1. Pre-Medical
Hi! I am about to relocate to a WWAMI state because of SO's job. I should be eligible to apply next year by August since we'll have been there for 12 months. This is absolutely my #1 choice and we are planning to stay there in the future so it would be ideal to not go back and forth to another state for med school, and much less disrupting to my family. However, I am wondering how having been there only a year will be perceived? We are rushing this move so I can apply, especially in the middle of a pandemic, but if my file will be thrown in the trash anyway because I am perceived as a newcomer, I will feel guilty about putting my family through this. We are really not happy with the housing situation so far. Anyone is WWAMI has classmates that were somewhat recent relocations? The plan then would be to apply OOS next year (probably wouldn't get in) and reapply in state the following year.
 
Last edited:

collegestud2013

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2010
462
154
266
  1. Attending Physician
As long as you list one of the WWAMI states on your AMCAS application, you'll be treated as an in-region/state applicant at the time of application even if you recently moved there. However, you'll be required to prove legal residency in one of their states later and after being accepted (at most schools if you fail to prove in-state residency, your acceptance gets withdrawn and re-reviewed as an OOS applicant.

However, even if you're a strong applicant you should still have back-up plans since UW is a very competitive medical school to get into, even for top applicants. As usual, plan to apply broadly to at least 20-30 med schools around the country, with most the schools having an ACCEPTED average GPA or MCAT near your GPA and MCAT and focusing on mostly private OOS schools (that have no or minimal in-state preference).

 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

lockedinphdjail

Full Member
May 21, 2020
13
2
26
  1. Pre-Medical
As long as you list one of the WWAMI states on your AMCAS application, you'll be treated as an in-region/state applicant at the time of application even if you recently moved there. However, you'll be required to prove legal residency in one of their states later and after being accepted (at most schools if you fail to prove in-state residency, your acceptance gets withdrawn and re-reviewed as an OOS applicant.

However, even if you're a strong applicant you should still have back-up plans since UW is a very competitive medical school to get into, even for top applicants. As usual, plan to apply broadly to at least 20-30 med schools around the country, with most the schools having an ACCEPTED average GPA or MCAT near your GPA and MCAT and focusing on mostly private OOS schools (that have no or minimal in-state preference).

Makes sense. I mean, you never know what your personal odds are. I am sure the 28% admission rate is deceptive, because depending of your profile it could be either 50% or 5% depending what they are looking for. Did you go through the program?
 
About the Ads
Aug 17, 2020
4
0
1
  1. Pre-Medical
As long as you list one of the WWAMI states on your AMCAS application, you'll be treated as an in-region/state applicant at the time of application even if you recently moved there. However, you'll be required to prove legal residency in one of their states later and after being accepted (at most schools if you fail to prove in-state residency, your acceptance gets withdrawn and re-reviewed as an OOS applicant.

However, even if you're a strong applicant you should still have back-up plans since UW is a very competitive medical school to get into, even for top applicants. As usual, plan to apply broadly to at least 20-30 med schools around the country, with most the schools having an ACCEPTED average GPA or MCAT near your GPA and MCAT and focusing on mostly private OOS schools (that have no or minimal in-state preference).

Hello,
excuse grammar please. Do you know if the same applies to the Anchorage/Alaska track since they don’t get many applicants or where I could find stats on the Alaska track specifically? I’m moving to Anchorage and hoping to work rurally. They require a 2 year residency, not a 1. How would I prove legal residency as well/when I arrived in Anchorage?
Thank you!
 
Aug 17, 2020
4
0
1
  1. Pre-Medical
Makes sense. I mean, you never know what your personal odds are. I am sure the 28% admission rate is deceptive, because depending of your profile it could be either 50% or 5% depending what they are looking for. Did you go through the program?
This was something I was wondering- if the stats were off; in favor of residents of Alaska.
 

dindjarin87

Full Member
Jan 3, 2020
402
1,065
76
Seattle, WA
  1. Non-Student
Hi! I am about to relocate to a WWAMI state because of SO's job. I should be eligible to apply next year by August since we'll have been there for 12 months. This is absolutely my #1 choice and we are planning to stay there in the future so it would be ideal to not go back and forth to another state for med school, and much less disrupting to my family. However, I am wondering how having been there only a year will be perceived? We are rushing this move so I can apply, especially in the middle of a pandemic, but if my file will be thrown in the trash anyway because I am perceived as a newcomer, I will feel guilty about putting my family through this. We are really not happy with the housing situation so far. Anyone is WWAMI has classmates that were somewhat recent relocations? The plan then would be to apply OOS next year (probably wouldn't get in) and reapply in state the following year.

I think this may differ per state, but for WA, you must have evidence of living in WA state for 12 months prior to matriculation. If you are a new resident to WA, you will be asked to complete residency verification prior to your secondary being accepted. The residency verification process is VERY thorough, I recommend submitting your residency verification packet as soon as possible. I am a reapplicant and last year I underestimated how long the verification process takes. My MCAT was returned on October 6th, I "submitted" my secondary as soon as received, but I was not verified as a resident until December 14th. One day before their deadline. I would recommend taking a gap year to build some strong experiences in the state, also. Their mission is to serve the state, if you don't have experiences that speak to that, you are in a tough spot (even if you have very high stats).

Hello,
excuse grammar please. Do you know if the same applies to the Anchorage/Alaska track since they don’t get many applicants or where I could find stats on the Alaska track specifically? I’m moving to Anchorage and hoping to work rurally. They require a 2 year residency, not a 1. How would I prove legal residency as well/when I arrived in Anchorage?
Thank you!

For Alaska students, 20 seats and had 81 applications for E2019 class.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Aug 17, 2020
4
0
1
  1. Pre-Medical
I think this may differ per state, but for WA, you must have evidence of living in WA state for 12 months prior to matriculation. If you are a new resident to WA, you will be asked to complete residency verification prior to your secondary being accepted. The residency verification process is VERY thorough, I recommend submitting your residency verification packet as soon as possible. I am a reapplicant and last year I underestimated how long the verification process takes. My MCAT was returned on October 6th, I "submitted" my secondary as soon as received, but I was not verified as a resident until December 14th. One day before their deadline. I would recommend taking a gap year to build some strong experiences in the state, also. Their mission is to serve the state, if you don't have experiences that speak to that, you are in a tough spot (even if you have very high stats).



For Alaska students, 20 seats and had 81 applications for E2019 class.
What kind of things could you think of that would attest to this? I’m guessing primarily community service?
 

dindjarin87

Full Member
Jan 3, 2020
402
1,065
76
Seattle, WA
  1. Non-Student
What kind of things could you think of that would attest to this? I’m guessing primarily community service?

Community service, sure, but more than just that, they want evidence that you understands some of the challenges your respective state faces. That can mean healthcare delivery, public health infrastructure, tax structures/systemic issues related to equity, access to services, exposure to harms, economics, etc. The EXCOM wants to see more than words about how you care about your state because of your SO, they want to see experiences that support an understanding of your state’s ecosystem and a desire to contribute to long term solutions. Really, most of this is available on their website. UWSOM’s website is the benchmark. Other schools direct to UW’s site to reference interview advice, how to strengthen an application, and a site dedicated to hot topics in bioethics that may appear in theirs or other interviews.
 

annad_700

New Member
Apr 17, 2020
6
2
1
  1. Pre-Medical
What kind of things could you think of that would attest to this? I’m guessing primarily community service?

I live in Anchorage and have for several years… Since you mentioned moving to Alaska, there are many organizations here that benefit the state/the native population, etc. If you are looking for a job I suggest looking into the native corporations and the openings they have available. In the healthcare field, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium is a grant run health organization that serves the native population. It is also related to Southcentral Foundation (also health organization serving native population), and the actual hospital itself is Alaska Native Medical Center (ANMC). In addition to some of these we have a LOT of not-for-profits aimed with a local mission at assisting the communities of Alaska. If you're looking for volunteer work then you could look into volunteer opportunities at ANMC, or the other two local hospitals (not completely local but still serve the community).
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
About the Ads
This thread is more than 1 year old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.