Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

Yale curriculum

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by grasshopper, Jul 14, 2001.

  1. grasshopper

    grasshopper Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was talking to some med students at a pretty traditional curriculum school, and they claim that students at Yale and other really "far-out" curriculum schools are all slackers who don't care about their educations. Anybody heard this? Also, anybody have anything to say about the area around Yale--is it walkable, livable, etc.?
     
  2. Dylann FMD

    Dylann FMD Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2001
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have heard the same thing, though I don't think it is totally true. I think Yale and these other programs are made up of the people who went to maybe a couple classes a week during their undergrad years and still got gpa's over 3.7's. If you are that type of person, Yale might be right for you. It is largely based on personally and group learning, instead of lectures. If you learn best from reading a book, then Yale sounds good. In my case, I learn best from lectures. Often times simply going to the lectures and taking notes will be 80% of the studying I do for a class. For that reason, I am applying to the med schools with more traditional curriculum, because that is where I know I will learn best. Pick what sounds best for you--by now you should know how you learn. But if you are a slacker, Yale definitely can catch up with you because they do give you so much free time. However, since the Yale kids still pass the boards, they must be learning something.

    As for the neighborhood around Yale, I have heard some not so great things. I have heard that it isn't the safest outside the campus (which I find hard to understand, since New Haven isn't that big, but I have never been there, so I trust those that have). I have also heard its kinda a boring town--not much too do recreation-wise, but then again, you will be in med school. Hope this helps.
     
  3. grasshopper

    grasshopper Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    0
    Actually, Dylann, I'm with you on the learning best from lectures thing. For this reason, I am considering deciding that a traditional curriculum would be best for me (I know of Columbia, NYU . . . where else are you applying that you know is this way?), but then I started reading about the small group thing. While I don't get anything out of reading a book, I do love to "argue" with friends about subject materials, and I tend to learn well this way. So I was thinking perhaps the whole "small group" thing that I hear about at Cornell, for one, (not sure about Yale . .?) might be good too. Now I'm in a quandry, so I've applied to some of each.
     
  4. SicVic

    SicVic Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2001
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    0
    I went to Yale for a tour and the students are relaxed and love it there. They are unique is some aspects. They have to write a research paper before they graduate which can be based on anything. They also have an honor system. Their midterm exams are on the web and you can do it in a sitting or have a break here or there. In other words, your testing your self. It is pivotal that you are mature and motivated to know what areas your lacking with such exams instead of a the manditory periodical midterms.
    I also liked the Yale setting, it is a diverse academic mall, so you have the opportunity to meet people who not just med. students.
    However, I didnt pick up any details about the party life, I tried asking but the med. student wasnt into the party life.
    I think thats enough..gLuck peace out
     
  5. Dylann FMD

    Dylann FMD Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2001
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    0
    Grasshopper:

    Ouch, the other thread certainly got vicious! Don't wimp out though--stand up for yourself!

    I also like group environments for studying, but keep in mind the way they are used. From undergrad, I often studied in groups trying to remember all the stuff from lecture, but this was simply remembering stuff taught in a traditional setting. I know Harvard really utilizes the group learning atmosphere--but they only have class one hour a day! That means you learn in groups what you haven't memorized on your own. There are other schools that have strong group learning initiatives along with traditional classes. Three top 20's with that are Washington U, Northwestern, and Michigan (I applied to all three!).

    What schools are you applying to GH?
     
  6. grasshopper

    grasshopper Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    0
    So you do or you don't like the idea of Harvard's curriculum? I assume your talking New Pathways? I have a friend who's starting this fall there; he said the students he had met when visiting were simply brilliant and amazing, and he wanted to be a part of that. I'm not sure how much of this is just the knowledge that you're at such a highly reputed school, though, and how much it actually matters. They only have 1 hour of class per day? I guess I'm not familiar with how things work there. Is it all small group PBL?

    As for where I'm applying, I'll send you a private message here in a sec, since I don't think anyone else really cares. :)
     
  7. Vader

    Vader Dark Lord of the Sith
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2001
    Messages:
    1,066
    Likes Received:
    14
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Grasshopper,
    Most of the people who say things such as those you had mentioned really don't know what they're talking about. At Yale, the students are very, very smart and self-motivated. The Yale System allows them flexibility in their education and eliminates inter-student competition. It is not for everyone, as one must be fairly independent and a self-directed learner to succeed in such a system. These are the types of people for which Yale selects. The area around Yale is surprisingly liveable and there is a lot to do because of the undergraduate campus and other east-coast cities are not very far away (i.e. 2 hrs to NYC). The students I met there seemed very happy. A word of advice: talk to people at the schools you are interested in to find out what they think. Obtaining a variety of perspectives will allow you to make a more informed decision when the time comes. ;)
     

Share This Page