UKO

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Mar 19, 2010
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Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I recently got into both Yale and Emory for the MPH in Health Management and I am having a difficult time deciding.

I understand Emory SPH is ranked higher than Yale SPH but I'm sure the Yale brand is stronger. I'm a UPenn c/o 2008 grad (BA) so the whole Ivy appeal is not that attractive to me anymore.

I like that the Yale MPH Health Management program has requirements in the Yale School of Management which may allow for a more comprehensive health care "business" education. However, the program is SO SMALL.

The Emory program is bigger, in a more vibrant city with seemingly more practicuum opportunities.

What would YOU do? Any advice/insight is greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

UKO

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That's true. How big of an issue do you think that is?
 
Jan 26, 2010
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It's a small consideration and I'm sure Emory will get accredited down the line. And the whole SPH is CEPH accredited. Plus the CDC is a great org. to be associated with.

First off, I don't think the US News Rankings are a true/reliable evaluation about a school's program. Stories (another poster on these forums) has pointed out a rough correlation between study body size and ranking. It's all about finding a proper fit for an individual's unique learning style.

I think you would be more concerned with class sizes. Personally, I prefer a program with smaller class sizes. The best classes I've taken in my undergraduate exp have been seminar courses with < 20 students. Its far too easy and tempting to sit back in a class with 80+ students (my deal-breaker with Michigan's MHSA). And in larger class sizes, the class discussion is often led by a handful of students which isn't really how I imagine graduate level learning.

Plus when recruiters come to visit campus or when you being to apply for fellowships/other jobs you are competing with more individuals. So its harder to differentiate yourself from your classmates who 1) mostly took the same courses 2) performed similarly 3) have recommendations from the same profs and 4) came out with a degree from the same school. Of course this is an exaggerated argument, but I hope you get the idea. Plus looking at the work placement of graduates, I would think they would be similar. Emory is kind of vague about their alum placements.

Also could you further explain why you are no longer attracted to the ivy league appeal?
 

UKO

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These are all excellent points. I hadn't really thought about the benefits of a smaller class size. However, I have also heard the opposite--larger class sizes allow you to learn more in that you'll be surrounded by so many more people from different backgrounds with different views.

Something else to consider that while Emory HPM students did their practicuums in a variety of places, I was informed that almost ALL Yale HM students did their practicuums at Yale hospital.

The whole Ivy appeal thing is great but as I have learned from undegrad is that it's benefits only do so much. The other non-Ivy schools with similar programs are highly regarded so what exactly is that benefit of the "Ivy" brand?
 

Stories

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The whole Ivy appeal thing is great but as I have learned from undegrad is that it's benefits only do so much. The other non-Ivy schools with similar programs are highly regarded so what exactly is that benefit of the "Ivy" brand?
I am not saying going to an Ivy is the be-all, end-all of schooling. But there is some distinct benefit of going to one. There are two tangible benefits to the Ivy name, and only one of them is apparent early on.

The early advantage
1.) Brand recognition: everyone knows them and they have the wow-factor, this more so applies to the most famous of them (eg. Harvard, Yale, Princeton). If you are exactly the same qualifications as someone else, you'll get a harder look just because your CV or resume says "Ivy League" on it.

The later advantage
2.) Networking group: unlike most universities, where you connect with some individuals that are fellow alumni of your university, you have the advantage of networking with some of the most competitive and ambitious individuals in the world. The student bodies at Ivies tends to be more international and more ambitious than your typical university and leads to more networking opportunity. Also, there seems to be a fellow Ivy alumni comradery that isn't present at other schools. Networking is promoted constantly at these schools, and for the known reason that who you know gets you further than what you know.

There is a reason that, on average, the Ivies have far greater alumni contributing than other universities. They are proud of where they graduated from, and so if you run into a fellow alumnus, it's to your advantage.