Advice on applying for AEGD/GPR

throwaway1000

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Nov 19, 2016
15
3
    Hi all! A few weeks ago, even though I haven't been in clinic for what seems like forever, I became a D4! Due to a number of factors including COVID-19, I feel like I a significantly lacking in terms of clinical experience. I haven't placed a crown, I haven't delivered an RPD, I haven't done a bride...etc. I can't even say I'm comfortable doing basic restorative work. I feel like I could really benefit from a residency in general dentistry. Specifically I am interested in prosth, OS, and endo. With that said, I'm pretty lost on where to apply or even if I should apply to a residency. I do not feel like I am a competitive applicant. I have not been able to form close bonds with faculty because our clinic time has been limited due to covid and other reasons.
    GPA: 3.4 Rank:50-80% Extracurriculars:Minimal Research: None Letters of Rec: Not sure who to ask...
    I had planned to use this time in clinic to work with faculty and find someone to write a strong LOR but that's really not an option for me right now. Do you guys have any advice in terms of programs I might be competitive in? Or how I can strengthen my application at this point? I am open to moving anywhere.

    Thanks for your input!
     

    Davicaine

    Full Member
    Apr 7, 2019
    16
    21
    1. Dentist
      Most GPR/AEGD programs aren’t very competitive. Many people would rather go straight into practice, although I imagine more people will be applying this year due to all this COVID stuff. Apply broadly and to as many as you can afford while saving enough money for maybe 5 potential interviews (you’ll likely receive more than this if you apply to more than 15 programs, but narrow it down afterward). I’d guess some interviews might be via zoom, which would be great from an expenditure standpoint. Go on as many interviews as you can afford.

      Some programs are known to be stellar, but that doesn’t mean the rest aren’t worth your time. Most programs are going to provide a solid experience and at the end of the day, as with anything, more effort/interest/initiative from you will translate into an even better experience.

      If you’re honest with faculty you’ve interacted with even minimally, essentially telling them what you just said, I think you’ll find people willing to write at least generic letters that will get your application in front of a program (even if the letters don’t make your application look better). Depending on your situation I would also, point-blank, ask faculty if they are able to write you a letter that is at least somewhat positive (and certainly not negative). If not, thank them for their honestly and ask elsewhere. If you don’t get in, be prepared to send materials to schools during post-match. Look up how post-match works beforehand since acting quickly is very important. It is highly likely you will get in somewhere, somehow.

      Write a very good personal statement since that’s an area you can standout despite shortcomings elsewhere in an application. Programs want people looking to learn and work hard. It sounds like you fit that description. Take residency seriously and you’ll come out more than competent.
       

      Alpha Centauri

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      Mar 6, 2013
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      Fhloston Paradise
        Most GPR/AEGD programs aren’t very competitive. Many people would rather go straight into practice, although I imagine more people will be applying this year due to all this COVID stuff. Apply broadly and to as many as you can afford while saving enough money for maybe 5 potential interviews (you’ll likely receive more than this if you apply to more than 15 programs, but narrow it down afterward). I’d guess some interviews might be via zoom, which would be great from an expenditure standpoint. Go on as many interviews as you can afford.

        Some programs are known to be stellar, but that doesn’t mean the rest aren’t worth your time. Most programs are going to provide a solid experience and at the end of the day, as with anything, more effort/interest/initiative from you will translate into an even better experience.

        If you’re honest with faculty you’ve interacted with even minimally, essentially telling them what you just said, I think you’ll find people willing to write at least generic letters that will get your application in front of a program (even if the letters don’t make your application look better). Depending on your situation I would also, point-blank, ask faculty if they are able to write you a letter that is at least somewhat positive (and certainly not negative). If not, thank them for their honestly and ask elsewhere. If you don’t get in, be prepared to send materials to schools during post-match. Look up how post-match works beforehand since acting quickly is very important. It is highly likely you will get in somewhere, somehow.

        Write a very good personal statement since that’s an area you can standout despite shortcomings elsewhere in an application. Programs want people looking to learn and work hard. It sounds like you fit that description. Take residency seriously and you’ll come out more than competent.
        Hey Doc, the 15 program application, should that be for everyone or just someone in the original poster's position? I have a pretty good idea of where I want to apply but that number is under 5 (all programs local to me)
         
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        Davicaine

        Full Member
        Apr 7, 2019
        16
        21
        1. Dentist
          Hey Doc, the 15 program application, should that be for everyone or just someone in the original poster's position? I have a pretty good idea of where I want to apply but that number is under 5 (all programs local to me)

          15 was in reference to the OP. 5 isn’t many programs, but if you’re intent on staying local and are reasonably competitive and/or have connections it’s probably fine. Especially if you’ve done your research and know what you’re looking for. Asking upperclassman and your faculty is probably the best way to gauge what’s appropriate in your situation. I only applied to one GPR that I had no connections at and it worked out, but my backup plan was to post match. Historically post-matching isn’t difficult for GPRs and I was reasonably competitive. Just based on SDN, it seems like COVID is increasing interest in GPR/AEGD programs and i’d expect it to be at least slightly more competitive.

          I can’t speak for the average GPR applicant, but it’s not uncommon for people to apply to 15-20+ programs when looking at specialties. I think the reason for that is because of high competition and not wanting to wait a year and apply again.
           

          nounours_l0l

          Full Member
          5+ Year Member
          Sep 30, 2015
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          1. Dentist
            Hey Doc, the 15 program application, should that be for everyone or just someone in the original poster's position? I have a pretty good idea of where I want to apply but that number is under 5 (all programs local to me)
            In Canada most people apply to only 2-3 programs for GPR. Also, i applied to 9 In the USA but only rank 2 and matched! I’d say you’re fine! (Except if the 5 programs are suuuper competitive and you have a ****ty gpa/LOR/etc.
             
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            throwaway1000

            Full Member
            2+ Year Member
            Nov 19, 2016
            15
            3
              Most GPR/AEGD programs aren’t very competitive. Many people would rather go straight into practice, although I imagine more people will be applying this year due to all this COVID stuff. Apply broadly and to as many as you can afford while saving enough money for maybe 5 potential interviews (you’ll likely receive more than this if you apply to more than 15 programs, but narrow it down afterward). I’d guess some interviews might be via zoom, which would be great from an expenditure standpoint. Go on as many interviews as you can afford.

              Some programs are known to be stellar, but that doesn’t mean the rest aren’t worth your time. Most programs are going to provide a solid experience and at the end of the day, as with anything, more effort/interest/initiative from you will translate into an even better experience.

              If you’re honest with faculty you’ve interacted with even minimally, essentially telling them what you just said, I think you’ll find people willing to write at least generic letters that will get your application in front of a program (even if the letters don’t make your application look better). Depending on your situation I would also, point-blank, ask faculty if they are able to write you a letter that is at least somewhat positive (and certainly not negative). If not, thank them for their honestly and ask elsewhere. If you don’t get in, be prepared to send materials to schools during post-match. Look up how post-match works beforehand since acting quickly is very important. It is highly likely you will get in somewhere, somehow.

              Write a very good personal statement since that’s an area you can standout despite shortcomings elsewhere in an application. Programs want people looking to learn and work hard. It sounds like you fit that description. Take residency seriously and you’ll come out more than competent.
              Thank you for your advice!
               
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