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How many ATP does it take

RSAgator

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    Definitely not relevant in terms of the MCAT. If you're really curious, it actually takes a different amount of energy to make each amino acid as they all go through different synthetic pathways. Just taking 2 basic examples to illustrate this point, glutamate/glutamine are produced from a transamination of alpha-keto-glutarate, an intermediate in the citric acid cycle. Alanine on the other hand is produced by the transamination of a pyruvate. Pretty much every metabolic intermediate is involved in amino acid synthesis (oxaloacetate, alpha-k-g, pyruvate, etc) as are many other molecules, so there's no set amount of energy required per amino acid. Off the top of my head I think the range is somewhere between 6 or so and 38 ATP.

    edit: in this explanation I assumed that the different essential metabolic intermediates, themselves producing different amounts of energy, would illustrate the different amounts of energy used in creating certain amino acids (i.e. amount required for synthesis ~ amount resulting from breakdown)
     

    Deepa100

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      Definitely not relevant in terms of the MCAT. If you're really curious, it actually takes a different amount of energy to make each amino acid as they all go through different synthetic pathways. Just taking 2 basic examples to illustrate this point, glutamate/glutamine are produced from a transamination of alpha-keto-glutarate, an intermediate in the citric acid cycle. Alanine on the other hand is produced by the transamination of a pyruvate. Pretty much every metabolic intermediate is involved in amino acid synthesis (oxaloacetate, alpha-k-g, pyruvate, etc) as are many other molecules, so there's no set amount of energy required per amino acid. Off the top of my head I think the range is somewhere between 6 or so and 38 ATP.

      edit: in this explanation I assumed that the different essential metabolic intermediates, themselves producing different amounts of energy, would illustrate the different amounts of energy used in creating certain amino acids (i.e. amount required for synthesis ~ amount resulting from breakdown)

      I actually had this in a biochem class but did not feel like reviewing it again because it looked like it was out of scope. This Q showed up in a TPR test...
       
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      RSAgator

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        For a protein composed of "n" number of amino acids,
        it takes (4n)-1 number of ATP for the translation process.

        For instance, a protein composed of 50 AA takes 199 ATP to translate. Its not technically all ATP, but it takes 199 high energy bonds.

        Hope that makes sense.

        would make sense if he asked how much ATP it took to make a protein =P
         

        Deepa100

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          For a protein composed of "n" number of amino acids,
          it takes (4n)-1 number of ATP for the translation process.

          For instance, a protein composed of 50 AA takes 199 ATP to translate. Its not technically all ATP, but it takes 199 high energy bonds.

          Hope that makes sense.

          Thanks, this is the right answer. Does each ATP have just one high energy bond then? I assume it is the PPi you are referring to.
           

          RSAgator

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            Just because you "know the question he is asking" doesn't mean he is asking the right question...how am I supposed to read his mind when he asks how much ATP is required to make an AMINO ACID but he means how much energy is required to make a PROTEIN. I think my comment was perfectly in order, and just as a matter of fact I think that answering a question that was never asked is counterproductive, even if you're answering the question that was meant to be asked. I think the distinction between amino acids and proteins is a pretty important one to make, both for the original poster and any person who might read this thread, and you don't do anyone a service in perpetuating this kind of misinformation. I think it is you who should think before you speak, and if at any time in the future you are so sure that the intended question is different to the question asked feel free to mention that in your post, it'll spare you a lot of unnecessary anger.
             

            coffeebythelake

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              Thanks, this is the right answer. Does each ATP have just one high energy bond then? I assume it is the PPi you are referring to.

              ATP has 2 high energy bonds. The energy can be released through two pathways:

              ATP -> ADP + Pi -> AMP + Pi

              or

              ATP -> AMP + PPi (pyrophosphate) followed by PPi -> Pi + Pi
               

              mtchin08

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                For a protein composed of "n" number of amino acids,
                it takes (4n)-1 number of ATP for the translation process.

                For instance, a protein composed of 50 AA takes 199 ATP to translate. Its not technically all ATP, but it takes 199 high energy bonds.

                Hope that makes sense.
                princeton says 200 though >_> states that 1 gtp is needed for termination?
                 
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