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Best Books For Sub-i

Discussion in 'Orthopaedic Surgery' started by jbf303, Feb 10, 2010.

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  1. jbf303

    jbf303

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    Can anyone suggest good books to get for Ortho Sub-is? I know Netters ortho anatomy is good, but any suggestions on general ortho reading would be much appreciated.
  2. DoctaJay

    DoctaJay bone breaker Moderator Emeritus

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    I am not an exlert at all bit from what the 4th years at my school told me the books that r very helpful are:
    1. netters for orthopaedics
    2. kovals textbook of fractures
    3. Surgical Exposures in Orthopaedics: The Anatomic Approach by Hoppenfeld
    4. and maybe ortho secrets

    I am going to definietly buy the first 3 books not so sure about the last one though
  3. gostudy

    gostudy Dead Giveaway

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    Wiesel and Delahay's (Georgetown faculty) Essentials of Orthopedic Surgery is an often overlooked but excellent book for students. It's mainly in prose form (reads sort of like the Blueprints series) but covers the essentials of what students should know cold to impress on externships.
  4. VFib911

    VFib911 excess NADH

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    Netter's ortho is too remedial, but about the best you can do for a pocket guide. Keep a more detailed anatomy atlas handy, even if it is in your room.

    Koval is packed with info and very portable.

    Hoppenfeld is essential before going in to the OR - know your approaches!

    Secrets was a waste of time, but OK if you are just filling time.

    I personally think Hoppenfeld and Koval are essential.
  5. Hyperlite2011

    Hyperlite2011

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    Does anyone have any advice on things to study before going into the sub-I? A resident I talked to said to definitely get these books you guys mentioned, and to know some high yield things like Salter-Harris, Lauge-Hansen, radial fractures and some commonly used blocks. Since a lot of us have almost no exposure to Ortho before the sub-I, is there anything else that's worth studying up on to get a good foundation and really hit the ground running?

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