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MSPP vs Widener Thoughts on each?

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by Psycho22, 02.15.12.


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    Hey, I recently got interviews at both schools recently. I was just wondering what you guys could tell me about each program and how they stack up to one another (reputation, practicum etc etc) Additionally, if anybody had interviews at these schools, tips would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much
  2. jruth0rj

    jruth0rj

    Joined:
    11.12.11
    Messages:
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    Status:
    Psychology Student
    I applied to MSPP and was recently accepted for early consideration. The interview was pretty much what you'd expect it to be - an individual interview with a professor and current student, a small group interview, and a brief writing sample. The faculty seemed liked they really cared about each student's success and ability to become a competent and sound clinical psychologist. The only "hitch" I've found is that the APA internship is optional your 5th year, and most students choose to graduate within 4. If you're serious about it, make sure you take that 5th year internship. Also, it's roughly $50,000/year to attend and live comfortably each year. They have limited scholarships (which you'll learn about at an info session the day you interview), but be ready for loans galore.

    I have no knowledge on Widener, but MSPP seemed like a tight-knit group of people, and the current students all seemed glad they chose to go there. Boston is a fun area to live in as well.
  3. busybusybusy

    busybusybusy

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    Status:
    Psychology Student
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    I applied to and interviewed at Widener last year and was very impressed with the program, it's practicum opportunities and it's students. The only major drawback for me was the money. However, you're going to pay that amount at either one of those schools. One HUGE plus for Widener is that they have an "in-house" APA accredited internship. Now, you can't go anywhere else, you HAVE to do their internship. But a guaranteed APA accredited internship could definitely be seen as a golden opportunity, especially if you plan on attending a non-funded program.

    I don't know anything about MSPP, so I can't comment on them.
  4. docma

    docma

    Joined:
    10.27.07
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    686
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    If you are going into that much debt having the internship included seems worth it to me. But it is more important to actually talk to current or recent students about what they liked/disliked and what the fit of research and theoretical interests is.
  5. Markp

    Markp Clinical Psychologist

    Joined:
    11.19.07
    Messages:
    2,269
    Status:
    Psychologist
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Agreed attending a captive internship is a huge benefit actually, as long as the training is top notch at the internship. Not having to worry about the hassle and stress of the match process is a nearly priceless investment.
  6. ClinicalABA

    ClinicalABA

    Joined:
    08.31.11
    Messages:
    196
    Status:
    Psychologist
    Be sure that the internship will qualify you for licensure every place could you imagine ever wanting to work. You are talking HUGE amounts of money. Do anything you can do to avoid the hassle and stress of the match process, with the caveat that whatever you do should not create more hassle and stress later. Not being able to move where you want/need to in the future because your internship does not qualify you for licensure is a big hassle.

    That said, having to pay $600-$800 bucks a month in student loan payments on a 50k annual salary (Remember that 75k median salary for doctoral psychs you hear about is for mid-career- I shouldn't have to tell you what the whole "median" thing means). Do the math, taking into consideration what you currently make now, actual and opportunity costs of graduate training, likely income in the future, and likely loan debt in the future, and see if it all makes sense financially. It ain't all about the money, but you will have debt and other financial obligations when you're done, so don't let a dream of being a psychologist cloud your view.

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