Menu Icon Search
Close Search

About the ads

UCD 2012 Students!

Discussion in 'UK & Ireland' started by Gos81238ia, 03.25.12.

  1. Gos81238ia

    Gos81238ia

    Joined:
    03.08.12
    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Status:
    Pre-Medical

    SDN Members don't see this ad. (About Ads)
    Hey guys! So figured I'd jump on this thread bandwagon and start one for students that will be in the UCD class starting in August 2012. Any questions or comments about UCD are welcome.

    I am from Ontario Canada and am finishing my undergrad the the University of Western Ontario and am going to be in the GEP program; I'm very excited to meet everyone and begin life in Ireland. I would definitely be interested in doing a meetup in the GTA for any other UCD 2012 students in the area. Anyone else on board?

    Ps. does anyone know if UCD meds also get laptops from the school like RCSI students do?
     
  2. Lbgem

    Lbgem Junior Member

    Joined:
    05.19.06
    Messages:
    384
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    No laptops.
     
  3. Gos81238ia

    Gos81238ia

    Joined:
    03.08.12
    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I just bought a new one so its probably good it won't go to waste lol
     
  4. Lbgem

    Lbgem Junior Member

    Joined:
    05.19.06
    Messages:
    384
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    don't forget to bring a adapter plug or plan to buy one here.
     
  5. medisforme

    medisforme mental health nurse

    Joined:
    04.10.08
    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    Canada
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Hello,

    I paid my deposit at UCD this am, and plan to attend if I am not accepted into UBC this year (4th try). Will keep you posted.
     
  6. fluteworld

    fluteworld

    Joined:
    04.06.12
    Messages:
    4
    I am starting my first year for 6 year program in UCD this September.
    Can you give me some advice on the Health Insurance?
    I've been through the site the ABP gave me but they are confusing.
    Which one do you have? How much does it cost? What's covered?
     
  7. medisforme

    medisforme mental health nurse

    Joined:
    04.10.08
    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    Canada
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    From personal experience, the cheapest health insurance is usually purchased through your bank. I have shopped around a lot during my past travels and RBC gave by far the most competitive package. Also remember when shopping for insurance that many companies have high deductibles (which they won't tell you about unless you ask). Usually banks charge a little more (a few dollars really) but do not have any deductibles.
     
  8. Lbgem

    Lbgem Junior Member

    Joined:
    05.19.06
    Messages:
    384
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    If you don't need extensive healthcare, just get the basic one that UCD recommends - it's like €120 or something like that for the year. It's very basic, but it'll get you through their requirements.
     
  9. fluteworld

    fluteworld

    Joined:
    04.06.12
    Messages:
    4
    Thank you.
     
  10. medisforme

    medisforme mental health nurse

    Joined:
    04.10.08
    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    Canada
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    So where are some of you thinking of living first year? Also, for those of you checking out this thread who are already at UCD, what has been your living arrangements and have you been happy with them? I have already been checking out some websites for apartments to rent. The school website states not to email them re: accommodations until June 5. As a mature student who has owned a house for the past 5 years, I have minimal desire to live in a dorm type setting. It is likely I will head down to Dublin late May and do some apartment hunting.
    For those of you already in Ireland what is the difference between an apartment, a flat and a studio apartment? Thanks in advance.
     
  11. Lbgem

    Lbgem Junior Member

    Joined:
    05.19.06
    Messages:
    384
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    I was going to make a tips/advice post a little later in summer, as it's finals right now for us. However, I can drop a quick note.

    Last year, basically our option was Glenomena pretty much automatically. It's the name of one of the dorm sets on campus. House 4 is where most of us internationals are booked up, and I recommend you stick with that to get to know your med classmates. A few of us here have made really good friendships that way and it's always nice to have a study buddy/classmate to compare notes with/etc. I also recommend that those of you going to UCD maybe mention to each other which apartment you're in so you can pick the same ones. Better to have a bunch of you together than with people from other programs that may have a completely different test (and party) schedule from you. It's not the end of the world if you don't.

    You'll get the building number (House 4), apartment (1-10 or such) and room (1-6). Apartments 1-3 are on the first floor (keep in mind this is floor 0/ground floor to the Irish, and Irish 'first' floor is our second floor). Very specific recommendations - I really liked where my apartment was situated, if you can, avoid facing the courtyard, as it can be noisy when people party/get drunk. Also some of them face directly across to the other building and you can literally see the other person cause even the mirrors line up. Some of the apartments face the wall/trees/grass, and I got lucky with that one, as it's always quiet and no weirdness with seeing your across the building neighbor. Another pro-tip - don't pick a middle room, nicer to have only one person next to you than 2. Middle rooms are 2 and 4, just fyi.

    Am I happy with it? Eh, definitely pros and cons. You get everything you expect when you're living with 5 other people (you get your own separate room/locked door, with separate bathroom/shower which is nice) - people taking other people's food, different lifestyles (early birds/night owls, partiers/studiers, etc), chores, cleanliness. Pros are really connecting well and early with your classmates. I would do the dorms again if I had the choice all over again. I won't be living in the dorms next year, however.

    I wouldn't go in May to pick an apartment/flat (same thing) cause then you'd be paying summer rent. Since you're making a trip to pick an apartment, either go a few weeks before school, or if you're really ambitious July.

    Studio = 0 bedrooms, it's the same as a studio over in N. America. Don't let the word flat trip you up.

    Hope that helps.
     
  12. medisforme

    medisforme mental health nurse

    Joined:
    04.10.08
    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    Canada
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    Thanks for the reply, some thoughts I had

    1) I realize May is quite early to go looking for apartments, but I have some vacation from work at this time that is why I was thinking of going. I have read that a lot of the apartments are already spoken for by summer. I do have some time off in July, though I have travelled to Europe before in the summer and it can be a gong show plus more difficult getting accomodation in hostels etc... However, your point is well taken, I may hold off on going down there then. In the grand scheme, adding $2000 to the overall tuition/living expenses is a drop in the bucket (if a decided to pay rent throughout the summer).

    2) I asked the difference between apartment/studio/flat etc... because a lot of the housing advertisements seem to be connected/part of a house as opposed to a separate apartment which is the standard here in North America. I would much prefer a stand alone apartment as opposed to renting a suite/room/extension of a house.

    3) Are there other on-campus options people used? I ask because I have been a house owner for the past five years and cannot possibly imagine going back to live in a dorm type setting. I live with my partner and her son and there is a strong chance they will be coming to live in Ireland after a year or two.

    If anyone else has ideas/experiences with accommodation feel free to post.
     
  13. Lbgem

    Lbgem Junior Member

    Joined:
    05.19.06
    Messages:
    384
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Hm i might be wrong about the apartment/flat thing. I didn't think there was a difference but I'm not sure now. I have been to places where they've converted a house into an apartment type thing.

    1. And it wouldn't be 2000, you're looking at May - August, so 4 months, probably around 4000$ rather than 2K.

    It's dorm or off-campus. I don't know of anything else on campus. I understand how you feel. And who told you all the apartments are gone by summer? A lot of people come back in August to find a place. And the Irish that are accepted that don't live in Dublin come down in July (according to some of my friends).
     
  14. medisforme

    medisforme mental health nurse

    Joined:
    04.10.08
    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    Canada
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 5+ Year Member
    I read it in the UCD student handbook, in the student accommodation section. It didn't necessarily say everything would be taken by August/Sept - just that it would be more difficult to find an apartment. However, I think I will take your advice and hold off a little time before heading down to find a place.
     
  15. funsmith

    funsmith

    Joined:
    05.05.09
    Messages:
    20
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    SDN 2+ Year Member
    Does anyone know if they have a facebook group page for the UCD 2012 class? I was unable to locate one.

    I am one of those travelling from California.

    I am planning on living in the dorms myself because I feel I do better when my schedule matches the schedule of my friends; it makes things better with work as well.

    Thanks about the apartment numbering info. I was hoping to coordinate it with others. If I don't find a page on FB I will create a Page for our class in the coming days.

    This is all beginning :}
     
  16. Shamis

    Shamis

    Joined:
    05.19.12
    Messages:
    14
    I asked some Irish med students and they told me that vhi is the best and cheapest health insurance plan that you can get...www.vhi.ie
    excited to meet all of you :)
     
  17. Shamis

    Shamis

    Joined:
    05.19.12
    Messages:
    14
    hey there...i m a Londoner..graduated from Western too :) when are u planning to fly to ireland? ps. TCD and UCD are apparently separate entities...it would be great if we can have a facebook group of TCD med 2012
     
  18. Gos81238ia

    Gos81238ia

    Joined:
    03.08.12
    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
  19. Lbgem

    Lbgem Junior Member

    Joined:
    05.19.06
    Messages:
    384
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    So I'm going to be there a little bit before your guys' orientation if you would like to meet up. I can give you some feedback from first year, and places to go/where to shop/the euro/bus system/etc before your orientation starts up (and things like quick tour around campus). You should also read some of the older threads on how to get to campus/etc.

    Air coach is probably the cheapest/easiest way for you to get to campus/dorms. Bus is cheaper but if you have no idea (which you probably won't) where things are, it is going to be a bit harder. You can buy air coach tickets online and you'll want to get the one to Leopardstown. Tell the driver you're going to UCD. It'll let you off near the campus gates. Once you see the big UCD sign, there are 3 ways to go - take the left path. Glenomena and Merville dorms are that way - you'll need to check in first by Merville. You'll see Centra/the student food store if you're in the right area (Merville is right behind it).

    Things you should bring - laptop/computer, contact lens solution (expensive in Ireland), favorite foods (like Ranch salad dressing packets, mac & cheese - KD for you Cannucks, CANDY - there is a serious lack of sweet candy in Ireland, at least to the level you're used to), makeup for the ladies (it's expensive in Ireland and you'll have to play around with new brands). There's definitely some things I'm missing I'm sure, you can ask and I can tell you if Ireland has it or not. Do NOT buy lots of books before you come - GENERALLY books are cheaper here and there's a good chance you won't need very many of them. Also, many of your upperclassmates have pdf files of the books, not that I am endorsing that...

    The weather in Dublin - it rains as often as you think it does, but not as much as you think it does. It basically has a drizzle half the time. Rarely heavy storms/rain. Warm clothes are nice - it doesn't really get more than 70F (you'll have to translate that Canadians). I remember one day it was 62F and all the Irish were out in shorts and lounging about, acting like it was a really nice day at the beach. In other words, don't expect sunshine and 70F+. It ranges from 40F (from winter nights) to 65F in the spring. Average is probably around 50F.

    Definitely have a way to either get cash (euros) at the airport, or exchange it before you come. It will take 1-2 weeks at least for you to set up your Irish bank account and get it running. The credit cards used in europe are different from the ones in the States - in that swiping your credit card is unusual and sometimes it will take the cashier a little while to figure out how to do it. They're used to the pin/laser credit cards (which you can get from the Irish bank once your account is set up) which you put in and enter your pin. Easier to use cash. If you go shopping at the big grocery stores - like Tesco, be sure to have a 1 euro coin on you cause the carts take a 1 euro deposit. Centra, the student one on campus is very small (no carts), but you can survive on that. It only has very basic stuff (milk, cereal, toilet paper, pens/paper, a small little hot deli, sandwich meats/etc), so if you wanted more than one or two options of shampoo, you'll need to hit up Tesco or Quinns.

    Have a record of your immunizations as well. Garda can ask for your health insurance, so get Odon or something similar before you come.

    Yes, the Irish drive on the opposite side of the road than States/canada. So if you're not used to that, look both ways before you cross the street. Signs are often bilingual - Gaelic and English.

    Ladies, there are some seriously cute Garda guys are the airport, so enjoy the eyecandy/your first welcome to Ireland. Fill out the card they give you on the plane. Also, try to sit up front in the plane/get out fast, so you can be somewhat in front of the line that you'll have to go through before getting your bags at the airport. If you're unlucky another plane full of non-EU citizens could have arrived and you could wait in line for 30 minutes easily.

    Don't act like the typical ignorant/loud American/foreigner and you won't get treated poorly. Act like an annoying tourist and you will have lots of fun waiting. If you even think you're being loud, YOU ARE BEING LOUD. The Irish are really friendly/nice, and the way to lessen the bureaucratic nightmares they have there sometimes (lots of rules/lines/paperwork/etc) is by who you know/how nice/polite you are to them.

    Alright, I've written a book - I hope it helps you newbies. Let me know if you have any questions.

    I've joined your facebook group and you can feel free to post questions on there as well.

    Edit: Also, when you're signing up for classes - Social history of Irish healthcare!!! 100% final which is MCQ. You will thank me later when your other classmates are crying about the elective they chose. The ONLY exception to this would be Molecules of Medicine if you're a non-science background, OR you want to help your Molecular Basis of Life & Disease (MBLD) grade - since the essay questions/lectures from Molecules trains you for MBLD tests.
     
    Last edited: 08.07.12
  20. one8piece

    one8piece

    Joined:
    03.15.12
    Messages:
    19
    Lbgem, that's a very helpful information!

    I have a few questions:
    1. If I were to bring IMac into Dublin airport, am I going to be taxed at the custom?

    2. Do you go to the "red" or "green" zone at the custom? Any stories or advice about the custom check at Dublin airport?

    3. Do you have to put coin in Dublin airport to use the cart for luggage?

    4. Do you know the max euro cash we can take in? I saw on some website it's about 6000Euro.

    5. In Canada, we can drink water straight from the tap whether its kitchen or showers. I read on a website that in Dublin, you can only drink off water from the tap in your kitchen sink because the pipe that connects to the kitchen tap is straight from Blessington lake (post-treatment). On the other hand, the water in the showers come from a tank in the building you are staying - so that tank is not very hygienic. I am staying off campus, so I want to get a heads up on this from your experience.

    6. Another thing I find new from my reading about Dublin is almost 90% of off campus rent, you have to pay your own utilities (water, electric, gas heating, household waste) rarely it is "all inclusive" like in Canada. I'm wondering if you know the approx cost of these 4 utilities per month?

    7. You said in they are not used to swiping credit card but uses pin/laser credit card, I just want to clarify the pin/laser credit card is still a credit card right? Are you saying the credit card machine in Ireland has the swiping and insert card function but the people dont like swiping card, they prefer inserting the card into the machine? In Canada, with one credit card you can swipe it (will still ask to enter pin if you have a chip card), insert it, or tap it (this is new so not all credit card machine has this function).

    8. I saw a lot about laser credit card on irish bank website. How does it work exactly?

    9. Is it true you have to pay 35Euro per year to the government for having a credit card and if you have both credit and debit card you have to pay 70Euro per year?

    10. Which bank would you recommend in Dublin?

    11. Ontario has 13% tax what about in Dublin?

    12. Do you file tax return every year in Dublin even if you are not working? In Ontario, you can still file tax return even if you are not working and you can get a bit of the sales tax back (HST/GST/PST).

    That's a lot of questions. I hope it will help the others who might have the same questions too. Thanks.
     
  21. Lbgem

    Lbgem Junior Member

    Joined:
    05.19.06
    Messages:
    384
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/ is a good source to use for information on Ireland. http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/money_and_tax/tax/duties_and_vat/value_added_tax.html According to this, yes if you exceed €430, but I've never been checked/had to pay this (lucky?/normal? perhaps). I have heard of something like this happening via mail being sent from outside Ireland to Ireland and the package was randomly checked/customs applied.

    You'll see the signs for EU and non EU. Non-EU is on your right, at least it was for the year I was traveling in and out, if that helps. No stories really :p except for the time there was an American guy in front of me with an EU passport and his wife with an American passport. He was arguing with Garda on how both of them should be allowed into the EU line. Garda was a bit exasperated with him and after he left there was a :rolleyes: from Garda with the whole 'dumb Americans' look on his face. Don't be that guy. Seriously - don't be that guy. Your life is going to be way harder if you do that.

    Not sure about this one. I know you want to take your life savings with you but may I recommend rolling bags? :p On a serious note, if you are planning on bringing a lot of stuff, you'll probably want to take a cab over, though it will cost you a pretty penny esp if the taxi driver takes you on a little tour/detour for extra $. I'd say be prepared for €50 easily. You're a Canadian it sounds like, so you might want to see if any of your fellow Cannucks/N. Americans are on the same flight as you and want to split a cab. The reason I say this is because it's roughly a ten minute walk with a lot of crap from outside of campus gates where the aircoach drops you off to Merville check in.

    <€10,000 if you don't want to declare. According to this same info, €6,348.69 or more can cause Garda to seize and detain it if they suspect you're a drug dealer/etc. May I recommend not carrying this much cash? I'd say if you're paying for everything with cash, €1,000 max is going to be plenty for a couple of weeks, assuming you're living in dorms/have rent paid for. I think I took out around €400 for a couple weeks and still had enough.

    Oh delivery/food - justeat.ie and eatcity.ie is what a lot of us North Americans used. Pizza - they have dominos, it's just like what you get over here. If you wanted a more Irish experience - Credo is really good. I tend not to get it often cause it's a lot more expensive than domino's. Apache is also popular but it seems mediocre to me. Since you're living outside of campus, I hope you live in Rathmines/Donnybrook/a little bit outside of campus cause a lot of times delivery places won't deliver to the college campus. At least it seemed like that to me when I was trying to get decent food :p. You can use the websites I mentioned and find out which ones do. Hm I think Diep was good Thai - I think that was the one, can't remember for sure.

    Be prepared to spend ~€15 for delivery unless you get it from a cheap place (Ho Ho's - chinese or dominos). Tip is not expected for delivery but I've always felt weird not giving anything. Usually what most people do here is say it cost 18.50, they give a 20 and let them keep the change.

    Well, I'm still alive and I have done both :p - drinking from the tap in the kitchen/bathroom sink. I read the same thing you did. I'd stick with kitchen and not drink from the bathroom sink. Also, you can get a Brita filter/its equivalent over there, so I'd recommend that and you're good to go.

    Yes to that from what I've found apartment hunting. Though not water. I don't have to pay for water at my apartment, and I was told by a fellow American that Irish actually don't pay for water at all, and it's unusual to do so.

    I do find it weird that there is a trash charge (though this is common - usually you pay for it, but sometimes your landlord does/includes it in the rent, which is the case for me). I'm being charged ~€50-70 per month for electricity, and then a little less for gas iirc. It's basically double what I expect to pay in the States. They're currently pro-rating me based on what the single lady before me used in the same apartment. So either she ran Christmas lights 24-7 or it's just a lot more expensive in Ireland. Pretty sure it's the latter :p.

    Those of you in the dorms don't have to worry about any of these charges.

    Yes, still a credit card. Aha! That's the term I was looking for - chip card. Definitely no tapping that I've seen. You insert and enter your pin. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_%28debit_card%29

    Yes, Irish don't really do the swipe card thing. But YOU CAN still bring your Visa/MasterCard/etc cards (I would check if I were you if they charge those pesky little international fees if you use it overseas). It's just a pain if you're at the grocery store and cashier is trying to figure out how to swipe it. Some know, some don't. You'll just hold up the line for a couple minutes while they figure it out. Rarely, there are places that don't have swipe functions, but this is not the norm. Dublin is very touristy. Very.

    See answer to question 7. You'll get a laser card once your bank account is set up.

    Uh not that I've seen.... Now you're making me want to check my bank statement :p. I haven't had it hit me yet, but it hasn't been a full year. Ok, I went and checked, it looks like €2.50 a year for my Laser card. Also, I believe you get charged for using ATMs even if they're within network here. I.e. using AIB ATM when having AIB account. It's only like 0.30 though. But better way to avoid the charge is to just ask for cash back when you're using your Laser card.

    Which reminds me - you'll need to get a mobile phone when you're over there - Meteor or O2 are the usual places to get one. Pay as you go are pretty common and what I'd recommend unless you talk a lot.

    This is personal preference. I like AIB cause there's a branch on campus. Bank of Ireland is just a short walk off campus. They usually have bonuses/freebies for signing up the first couple weeks of the school year aimed at students. AIB gave the whole student travelcard thing (basically discount on your bus pass) for a year. I think Bank of Ireland had something similar.

    Ah lovely VAT. It's a lot, but usually it's baked into whatever I'm buying so I don't see it as a separate thing on my receipt. If you're planning on buying booze to take back to friends/family you can buy it at the airport duty free iirc. You CAN I believe get a VAT refund if you buy it from somewhere else and get charged VAT, but are taking the booze out of the country, but I'd say stick to buying it at the airport or someplace where you know it's cheaper than airport. I was surprised, but I paid more outside the airport for whiskey than I did at the airport (where I assumed everything was way more expensive). I did go to a touristy place to buy it though in Dublin.

    Not that I know of. And that's nice :p. Canadians seem to get a lot of perks. In the States I don't get anything back if I don't work, and I don't have to file if I don't work in the States.

    Yw. Hope that helps.
     
  22. one8piece

    one8piece

    Joined:
    03.15.12
    Messages:
    19
    Yeah long time ago I heard water is free in Ireland, but I think I read it on the news a while back that they are starting to charge. How about internet provider? Which providers are there in Dublin and the monthly cost?

    I love to use credit card, I guess I have to give up on it in Ireland since they charge an annual stamp duty of 30Euro and I still have to pay the credit card annual fee. The bank sure have lots of tiny little charges here and there.

    Have you been to the Chinatown in Dublin? Any comments? Is there an opportunity to skate and snowboard in Ireland? HAHAHAHA probably not with the weather?! Are there good beaches in Dublin?

    A quick question about renting off campus for first year in Dublin. Some landlord ask for references, how do I get that if I have never live in Dublin? What documents do they usually ask for when you sign a lease? (e.g. is it normal for them to ask for bank account number and copy of passport?)
     
  23. Lbgem

    Lbgem Junior Member

    Joined:
    05.19.06
    Messages:
    384
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Okay if you use the website I linked earlier it answers your question: Domestic water charges were abolished in 1997...

    Okay, I don't see how they could charge you for your Canadian/American credit card. I haven't been charged by Ireland for this. Irish credit cards might be a different story. Honestly I'd stick to using your laser card, and if you need to, use your Canadian one (as long as it doesn't charge international fees). I had MasterCard through Capital One and it did not have international charges.

    'Chinatown' yes. It doesn't compare to the ones in the states. Can't speak for Canada. I'm Chinese so I know what real Chinese food should taste like and it's not really one of Dublin's strong suits. There is a theoretically decent Asian store that I need to check out at some point, where you could get Asian groceries and make your own food.

    As to skiing/snowboarding, I would travel outside of Ireland for this during breaks. Flights within Europe are super cheap - think 40$ roundtrip to Paris. Half the time checking in a bag costs more than the flight.

    Ireland is a gorgeous place - great for sightseeing.

    Good beaches in Dublin - not that I know of. There is a great coastline if you travel down towards Greystones and there are walking points around there.

    Er - you made it sound like you already had a place? I had a list of my landlords/references in the states for them that they could call. They tend to make exceptions if you're obviously not Irish/don't have Irish references. They didn't bother checking any of my references cause they liked me. This is how a lot of things work there - can minimize the paperwork if they like you.

    Daft.ie would be the place to search for housing. Yes, some places asked me for a copy of my passport and a copy of my acceptance letter. I had all of these things ready when I went to see the apartment so I could get it on the spot if I liked it. Bank account number seems weird but I can't really comment on that. I did give them a copy of my bank statement to show I had the funding, although this was overkill. A lot of times landlords tend to go by how they feel about you. If they think you'll be a great tenant then they may not check everything/ask for all the paperwork. Really, it just depends.
     
  24. fluteworld

    fluteworld

    Joined:
    04.06.12
    Messages:
    4
    Hi there,

    I will be living in Glenomena this September and I heard that having a under-the-counter mini-fridge and a toaster over would be useful. Has anyone had these in their rooms? If so, where would I be able to purchase them?

    Thanks
     
  25. Lbgem

    Lbgem Junior Member

    Joined:
    05.19.06
    Messages:
    384
    Status:
    Medical Student
    SDN 7+ Year Member
    Where did you hear that? Glenomena comes with 2 mini fridges actually, and has a toaster. You can see when you get there. It wouldn't hurt to have your own mini fridge, but most of us didn't need one. Toaster oven up to you - it would probably work for things like cookies or frozen dinners that need an oven - I can see how it'd be useful. Why don't you check Glenomena out first and see how you feel?

    The place to go would be Argos most likely. Don't be afraid to check amazon.co.uk either for best price/deal.
     
  26. fluteworld

    fluteworld

    Joined:
    04.06.12
    Messages:
    4
    Hi there, I am about to start medicine this September, and I was wondering which electives would be better.

    I am currently debating whether or not to take Clinical Human Anatomy I and II or go with my strengths into musicianship.

    Also, I am going into medicine as an undergraduate.

    The reason I'm asking this is because I'm concerned about the workload of first year medicine and although I want an elective that will help me in the future, I don't want it to weigh me down.

    Thanks
     

// Share //

Style: SDN Universal