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1 year postbacc or 2 year postbacc?

Discussion in 'Postbaccalaureate Programs' started by ycyeh1, Apr 9, 2007.

  1. ycyeh1

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    Hi Everyone,

    I am currently trying to decide on the best postbaccalaureate program for me but have a few questions first:

    1.) There are many 2 year programs that are considered full time (Columbia, Rutgers, UPenn), but if you break it down, it's really two full courses with lab per semester. Will med schools consider this an "easier" courseload considering that there are programs that finish in 1 year?

    2.) If I do go into a 1 year program (Scripps, Bryn Mawr), I would have to take Gen Chem during the summer as it is a prerequisite to Organic Chem. I've heard that taking science courses during the summer is considered an easy way out medical schools and are frowned upon. Is this true? :confused:

    I'd really appreciate any insight out there. I've already applied to some programs but am trying to decide if I should start this fall with a 2 year program or if I should work another year and do a 1 year program.

    Thanks!
     
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  3. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member
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    Med schools have no problem with summer courses, so long as they are at reputable places. They are rarely easier though since they are generally compressed. You are simply misinformed.

    As for 1 vs 2 years, you should do whatever pace you think will allow you to get "mostly A's". That is the sole goal of a postbac, and it's better to do well than to get through quickly. However, of the schools you listed, Bryn Mawr probably does the most to market their students to med schools, which reportedly counts for a lot. You probably would get a lot of info if you read through the postbac board on SDN.
     
  4. Kateb4

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    I second that summer courses are not easier. I took Orgo I in a 4 week condensed summer course and it kicked my butt. I ended up with a C in that one, and now am getting an A in Orgo II. So, don't worry about schools frowning upon a summer chem class from a 4-year university, worry more about doing well in that class.

    As for picking the 2 year or 1 year options, I really think that you need to pick what fits into your life better. If you need to work more or are not really in any hurry then go for the 2 year program. If you are able to invest more time into the program, and want to get on the fast track, then go for the 1 year. I don't think that either will be held above the other so long as you make good grades and if you are not in class full time, fill that time with worthwhile endeavors like working in the medical field or research.
     
  5. njbmd

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    Moving to Post Bacc Forum.
     
  6. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 chick magnet
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    I think it depends on a number of factors. One of the reasons I enjoyed my two years at Scripps was because I was able to pace myself, being able to take the MCAT in the summer between the two years was key. I finished the full program (except for the MCAT) during my first year, and did MCAT in the summer and 5 upper division courses during my second year. While most people would still consider that rigorous, it was certainly easier than doing the three lab courses + MCAT studying thing during second semester. A lot of current Scripps PBs have pushed back their MCATs because it's hard to study for it while doing courses.
     
  7. postbacker

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    Please clarify - the main thing you did differently from a 1 year post bac was to study for and take the MCAT in the summer? Otherwise you still did the 3 courses plus lab each semester, right?

    I am entering a one year post bac in June, and I basically have the same concern (trying to take the MCAT during the second semester vs taking it in the summer)...
     
  8. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 chick magnet
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    Yeah, I took GChem in the summer, Ochem, Intro Bio, and Physics in the fall, and Ochem, Physiology, and Physics in the spring, without taking the MCAT. This is fine as long as you're not linking, but if you're applying in one year, you're going to be applying late if you take the MCAT in the summer. That's why I decided to take all upper division courses during my second year, and do research, and apply this summer on June 1.
     
  9. eaneffets

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    I'm trying to decide between the post-bac program at Tufts versus the one at Johns Hopkins. Any advice about these programs? I really like the research opportunties that are incorporated into the curriculum at Hopkins, but I also liked the program at Tufts. Is one more reputable than the other? Thanks!
     

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