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brockhamptonfanacct

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This is a gray zone. We would probably call it a conditional acceptance, not a matriculation. Others may differ (clearly, UMKC does).

That gives me some hope. Thank you. What would you recommend I check on AMCAS/AACOMAS? I am addressing my time in the program transparently and thoroughly in other parts of my application, but I fear checking that box in the event that I automatically get screened out at several places, especially because I did not take traditional pre-clinical/medical coursework.
 

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That gives me some hope. Thank you. What would you recommend I check on AMCAS/AACOMAS? I am addressing my time in the program transparently and thoroughly in other parts of my application, but I fear checking that box in the event that I automatically get screened out at several places, especially because I did not take traditional pre-clinical/medical coursework.
I doubt that you will be dismissed out of hand for participation in a Bac MD program (whatever you decide to check).
There will be schools that have requirements for particular classes that may exclude you for not taking them.
 

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I doubt that you will be dismissed out of hand for participation in a Bac MD program (whatever you decide to check).
There will be schools that have requirements for particular classes that may exclude you for not taking them.

I appreciate that, thank you. I was thinking of the schools like Stanford that clearly outline that any student who has matriculated to a medical school will not be considered.

I transferred to a separate, comparable institution after withdrawal and have a spreadsheet of different schools' requirements where I keep track of exactly which courses schools require, and I take them accordingly. Is that what you were referencing in the second sentence, or did you mean other courses?
 

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I appreciate that, thank you. I was thinking of the schools like Stanford that clearly outline that any student who has matriculated to a medical school will not be considered.

I transferred to a separate, comparable institution after withdrawal and have a spreadsheet of different schools' requirements where I keep track of exactly which courses schools require, and I take them accordingly. Is that what you were referencing in the second sentence, or did you mean other courses?
If you are a candidate for Stanford, you should contact Stanford directly to clarify!
Schools continue to have specific requirements. As long as you meet them, they are unlikely to care much about your bac MD program.
 
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KnightDoc

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This is a gray zone. We would probably call it a conditional acceptance, not a matriculation. Others may differ (clearly, UMKC does).
Does the answer change if UMKC, unlike just about every other BS/MD program, where conditional acceptance is the norm, considers it one, integrated 6 year program rather than a 2+4? (25% of the coursework during the first two years is considered medical school coursework, and there no MCAT requirement, EC benchmarks, etc. At the end of the day, if the UMKC MD admission is considered conditional, isn't every MD admission "conditional" insofar as students can always be asked to leave prior to graduation for a variety of reasons?)

This is probably why UMKC is taking the position it is. In fact, if I am not mistaken, and unlike every other MD program in the country that has a direct entry program, UMKC's entire MD class is filled through this program, with the only exceptions being a very few candidates admitted after the second year to replace those like OP who withdraw or are asked to leave.
 
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brockhamptonfanacct

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Does the answer change if UMKC, unlike just about every other BS/MD program, where conditional acceptance is the norm, considers it one, integrated 6 year program rather than a 2+4? (25% of the coursework during the first two years is considered medical school coursework, and there is no MCAT requirement. At the end of the day, isn't every MD admission "conditional" insofar as students can always be asked to leave prior to graduation for a variety of reasons?) This is probably why UMKC is taking the position it is, and why they have those classes in the very first year. In fact, if I am not mistaken, and unlike every other MD program in the country that has a direct entry program, UNKC's entire MD class is filled through this program, with the only exceptions being a very few candidates admitted after the second year to replace those like OP who withdraw or are asked to leave.

To clarify: the 25% of the coursework during the first two years that would universally be considered medical school coursework, and is where the MD only students start, is the Human Structure and Function Series that begins second semester of their second year. They do consider other aspects clinical, such as the courses I took, but a significant chunk of that 25% is that sprawling, 4-course combination that starts in the second semester of their senior year and culminates in the reception of a white coat.

You are correct in that the majority of their MD class is filled via the program; I believe the remaining spots are ~20 or so a year for MD only students.
 
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KnightDoc

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To clarify: the 25% of the coursework during the first two years that would universally be considered medical school coursework, and is where the MD only students start, is the Human Structure and Function Series that begins second semester of their second year. They do consider other aspects clinical, such as the courses I took, but a significant chunk of that 25% is that sprawling, 4-course combination that starts in the second semester of their senior year and culminates in the reception of a white coat.

You are correct in that the majority of their MD class is filled via the program; I believe the remaining spots are ~20 or so a year for MD only students.
I think you'll be fine in any event. Note: I am not an adcom, just a fellow premed, but UMKC is such an outlier that I really don't think other schools will consider withdrawal from this program to be the same red flag that withdrawal from a regular MD program would be.

I'm just saying that it's a very atypical program, where the med school curriculum is integrated from the start (regardless of how marginal you believe it is in the first year). It is not conditional insofar as you do not have MCAT and service requirements to matriculate to the med school (which, technically, you do at the very start even though you don't have a white coat ceremony). Finally, for the record, the only reason any spots are filled by MD only students is to replace people like you, rather than setting up a system where they over accept into the program and then have to force some people out if enough don't leave on their own or through objective academic under performance. The program IS the MD school at UMKC, and the MD school IS the program. This is why UMKC is taking the position that you are withdrawing from a MD program.

At the end of the day, I would absolutely defer to the wisdom of adcoms such as @gyngyn on this, but, really, UMKC is the authority here, and even @gyngyn is applying a general rule here, as is anyone coming to a different answer than UMKC. If anyone screens you out because of this, so be it, but, since you are going to be honest in any event, trust that someone will at least look at your app before screening you out, see that you are coming from the UMKC 6 year program, and look at you differently from the random applicant who withdrew from XYZ COM for whatever reason and is now applying. In general, med schools are not fans of 6 year programs, which is why so very few of them offer one.
 
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brockhamptonfanacct

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I think you'll be fine in any event. Note: I am not an adcom, just a fellow premed, but UMKC is such an outlier that I really don't think other schools will consider withdrawal from this program to be the same red flag that withdrawal from a regular MD program would be.

I'm just saying that it's a very atypical program, where the med school curriculum is integrated from the start (regardless of how marginal you believe it is in the first year). It is not conditional insofar as you do not have MCAT and service requirements to matriculate to the med school (which, technically, you do at the very start even though you don't have a white coat ceremony). Finally, for the record, the only reason any spots are filled by MD only students is to replace people like you, rather than setting up a system where they over accept into the program and then have to force some people out if enough don't leave on their own or through objective academic under performance. The program IS the MD school at UMKC, and the MD school IS the program. This is why UMKC is taking the position that you are withdrawing from a MD program.

At the end of the day, I would absolutely defer to the wisdom of adcoms such as @gyngyn on this, but, really, UMKC is the authority on this, and even @gyngyn is applying a general rule here, as is anyone coming to a different answer than UMKC. If anyone screens you out because of this, so be it, but, since you are going to be honest in any event, trust that someone will at least look at your app before screening you out, see that you are coming from the UMKC 6 year program, and look at you differently from the random applicant who withdrew from XYZ COM for whatever reason and is now applying.

Thank you; I appreciate your response. I did understand the point you were making--you are right in that it is not so much a conditional acceptance because we don't have to take the MCAT at all and meet certain benchmarks (other than GPA, of course) to continue. It certainly is an atypical program, which has brought me a lot of conflicting opinions! I'll have to play the cards I've got, pretty much.
 
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KnightDoc

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Thank you; I appreciate your response. I did understand the point you were making--you are right in that it is not so much a conditional acceptance because we don't have to take the MCAT at all and meet certain benchmarks (other than GPA, of course) to continue. It certainly is an atypical program, which has brought me a lot of conflicting opinions! I'll have to play the cards I've got, pretty much.
I really think you will be fine. Nobody else does what UMKC does, normal schools understand how ridiculous and intense a 6 year program is, and withdrawing from it as an 18-19 year old will be viewed very differently from withdrawing from a regular MD program at age 23+. UMKC might be the only school in the country with an integrated curriculum like this, and might very well be the only BS/MD program in the country that would present you with this dilemma.

Any med school for which you would otherwise be competitive will look below the surface of your "withdrawal from medical school" and not hold this against you. @gyngyn is really saying the same thing, without knowing the specifics of UMKC, and that is typical of how adcoms will view your application. My advice would be to report it as UMKC advises, and let the process play out. Assuming you are checking all the right boxes, you will be successful.
 
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brockhamptonfanacct

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I really think you will be fine. Nobody else does what UMKC does, normal schools understand how ridiculous and intense a 6 year program is, and withdrawing from it as an 18-19 year old will be viewed very differently from withdrawing from a regular MD program at age 23+. UMKC might be the only school in the country with an integrated curriculum like this, and might very well be the only BS/MD program in the country that would present you with this dilemma. Any med school for which you would otherwise be competitive will look below the surface of your "withdrawal from medical school" and not hold this against you. @gyngyn is really saying the same thing, without knowing the specifics of UMKC, and that is typical of how adcoms will view your application.

This was a very compassionate and kind response, thank you. I appreciate the humanity behind you understanding my fear and concerns; I usually either get the response of "of course you'll be fine, look at your extracurriculars and stats" or "that's what you get for withdrawing from a medical program." It means a lot to me that you went out of your way to acknowledge the uniqueness of my situation.
 

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Yes, UMKC is the only BSMD program with that kind of curriculum. I also (not an adcom) think you will be absolutely fine. As someone who followed BSMD programs for last few years, I am curious, why did you withdrew from the program?
 
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brockhamptonfanacct

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Yes, UMKC is the only BSMD program with that kind of curriculum. I also (not an adcom) think you will be absolutely fine. As someone who followed BSMD programs for last few years, I am curious, why did you withdrew from the program?

I appreciate your response! I will have to respectfully decline responding, as many of my reasons were intertwined between personal/school-specific situations, and I don't want to speak poorly of UMKC or BSMD programs in general. It's a great program when it works out for others (for example, my boyfriend is currently doing very well there).
 
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KnightDoc

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I appreciate that, thank you. I was thinking of the schools like Stanford that clearly outline that any student who has matriculated to a medical school will not be considered.

I transferred to a separate, comparable institution after withdrawal and have a spreadsheet of different schools' requirements where I keep track of exactly which courses schools require, and I take them accordingly. Is that what you were referencing in the second sentence, or did you mean other courses?
Also, Stanford is pretty much impossible for mere mortals to be accepted to under the best of circumstances, but I'd bet even they are not contemplating your situation with their policy. If you are otherwise competitive, I would be shocked if they would discourage you from applying under these circumstances.
 

brockhamptonfanacct

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Also, Stanford is pretty much impossible for mere mortals to be accepted to under the best of circumstances, but I'd bet even they are not contemplating your situation with their policy. If you are otherwise competitive, I would be shocked if they would discourage you from applying under these circumstances.

Oh, yeah, I don't mean to imply that I'm confident Stanford will open my profile and be wowed. It was more just an example of schools that have specifically stipulated that policy on their admissions requirements.
 

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Yes, UMKC is the only BSMD program with that kind of curriculum. I also (not an adcom) think you will be absolutely fine. As someone who followed BSMD programs for last few years, I am curious, why did you withdrew from the program?
This should be obvious -- because the program is obnoxiously repressive and unreasonably condensed. The mistake OP made was not withdrawing, but allowing himself to be sucked into it in the first place, as evidenced by his performance since he left it.
 

KnightDoc

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Oh, yeah, I don't mean to imply that I'm confident Stanford will open my profile and be wowed. It was more just an example of schools that have specifically stipulated that policy on their admissions requirements.
Yes, and all I'm saying is that their policy is directed at the traditional candidate who has issues and withdraws from a regular program, as a 20-something, as a M1 or later. They are not interested in that person after they get their act together. I honestly don't think they are contemplating a HS student who made a mistake by enrolling in a 6 year program and later having second thoughts and withdrawing, although I can of course be wrong. Give yourself peace of mind by calling them to ask, and please report back.
 

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This should be obvious -- because the program is obnoxiously repressive and unreasonably condensed. The mistake OP made was not withdrawing, but allowing himself to be sucked into it in the first place, as evidenced by his performance since he left it.

*her performance :) But thank you for the kind words.
 
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brockhamptonfanacct

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Yes, and all I'm saying is that their policy is directed at the traditional candidate who has issues and withdraws from a regular program, as a 20-something, as a M1 or later. They are not interested in that person after they get their act together. I honestly don't think they are contemplating a HS student who made a mistake by enrolling in a 6 year program and later having second thoughts and withdrawing, although I can of course be wrong. Give yourself peace of mind by calling them to ask, and please report back.

That makes sense, yes! I did email and I was told that even though my circumstances may warrant checking yes to that AMCAS question (I wasn't given a definitive answer on whether I should check it or not), they do read every application individually and consider the circumstances of that applicant before applying that policy.
 
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This should be obvious -- because the program is obnoxiously repressive and unreasonably condensed. The mistake OP made was not withdrawing, but allowing himself to be sucked into it in the first place, as evidenced by his performance since he left it.
I do agree it's unreasonably condensed but won't call it repressive and I share your sentiments about BSMD programs in general :) I don't like 6 year programs so advise everyone against applying. However I do know a kid who went thru it and matched to T5 school for residency.
 
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*her performance :) But thank you for the kind words.
Thanks for the correction. I have an opinion because I looked carefully at BS/MD programs before taking a hard pass, and am well aware of the unique negatives of the UMKC program, so I feel for you, and whatever parental pressure might have led to your situation.
 

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Thanks for the correction. I have an opinion because I looked carefully at BS/MD programs before taking a hard pass, and am well aware of the unique negatives of the UMKC program, so I feel for you, and whatever parental pressure might have led to your situation.

Definitely a few parental pressures at play, yeah. Turned down a full ride at a T40. But I'm grateful for the experiences I've had and the HUGE amounts of resilience and grit it's brought me, so here's to hoping it works out for the better ultimately!
 
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KnightDoc

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That makes sense, yes! I did email and I was told that even though my circumstances may warrant checking yes to that AMCAS question (I wasn't given a definitive answer on whether I should check it or not), they do read every application individually and consider the circumstances of that applicant before applying that policy.
Again, they cannot give you a definitive answer because the person dealing with the inquiry is unaware of the unique characteristics of the UMKC program, like @gyngyn, who is in general one of the most knowledgeable and genuinely helpful adcoms on SDN. This is why I think you should defer to UMKC's judgment in checking the appropriate box. As @gyngyn said, pretty much no school will dismiss you out of hand, regardless of how you answer the question, and your situation is very different from the typical applicant who previously withdrew from a MD program.
 

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Definitely a few parental pressures at play, yeah. Turned down a full ride at a T40. But I'm grateful for the experiences I've had and the HUGE amounts of resilience and grit it's brought me, so here's to hoping it works out for the better ultimately!
Full ride at a T40? Trust me, you made the correct call, and will very likely end up in a school way better than UMKC, with a far superior COA (make back some of the money you lost at UMKC :)). Just make sure your ECs are where they need to be.

I will make the assumption that you are likely to do very well on the MCAT. What year are you? I'm assuming you are not applying this cycle, but can't tell if you are entering your junior or senior year. Given your grades and everything else you disclosed, why are you considering DO for your first cycle? 4.0 after rough first year under your circumstances makes a great story, and a 3.75+ GPA is nothing to sneeze at. If your MCAT is where all indications are it will be, you will be extremely competitive for MD, even if not for Stanford! P.S. 4.0 after first year would not take you out of the running for Standford.
 

brockhamptonfanacct

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Full ride at a T40? Trust me, you made the correct call, and will very likely end up in a school way better than UMKC, with a far superior COA (make back some of the money you lost at UMKC :)). Just make sure your ECs are where they need to be.

I will make the assumption that you are likely to do very well on the MCAT. What year are you? I'm assuming you are not applying this cycle, but can't tell if you are entering your junior or senior year. Given your grades and everything else you disclosed, why are you considering DO for your first cycle? 4.0 after rough first year under your circumstances makes a great story, and a 3.75+ GPA is nothing to sneeze at. If your MCAT is where all indications are it will be, you will be extremely competitive for MD, even if not for Stanford! P.S. 4.0 after first year would not take you out of the running for Standford.

I know I've said this like three times, but firstly: thank you sincerely for believing in my application, unique backstory and all, flaws and all.

I used to research pre-med requirements all the time in high school before I got into UMKC, so yeah, I pretty much hit the ground running the second I transferred. I just wrapped up my sophomore year and created long-lasting opportunities for myself in terms of non-clinical volunteering, clinical volunteering and experience, research, healthcare employment, leadership, etc. I also have a few unique ECs (like interning for a political campaign, because my major is Public Policy Administration and I'm interested in that). Shadowing is 125+ hours, etc, etc, you know the drill. I'm worried about my clinical hours because of the pandemic, so will probably take a gap year.

I'm primarily considering DO schools for a couple of reasons:
  • Prestige is not a huge deal to me. My heart is in primary care or psychiatry, underserved communities, public health more so than research, etc. I do love research, though, and would definitely reap the benefits of a research-oriented school.
  • I want to maximize my chances of being near my boyfriend again, whether MD or DO. He's wrapping up his second year at UMKC, and us doing long-distance has made it clear to both of us that we would give anything to be near each other again.
  • I feel like I could score anywhere from a 490 to a 520 on the MCAT, lol. Gotta keep my options open just in case.
 
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EdgeTrimmer

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I know I've said this like three times, but firstly: thank you sincerely for believing in my application, unique backstory and all, flaws and all.

I used to research pre-med requirements all the time in high school before I got into UMKC, so yeah, I pretty much hit the ground running the second I transferred. I just wrapped up my sophomore year and created long-lasting opportunities for myself in terms of non-clinical volunteering, clinical volunteering and experience, research, healthcare employment, leadership, etc. I also have a few unique ECs (like interning for a political campaign, because my major is Public Policy Administration and I'm interested in that). Shadowing is 125+ hours, etc, etc, you know the drill. I'm worried about my clinical hours because of the pandemic, so will probably take a gap year.

I'm primarily considering DO schools for a couple of reasons:
  • Prestige is not a huge deal to me. My heart is in primary care or psychiatry, underserved communities, public health more so than research, etc. I do love research, though, and would definitely reap the benefits of a research-oriented school.
  • I want to maximize my chances of being near my boyfriend again, whether MD or DO. He's wrapping up his second year at UMKC, and us doing long-distance has made it clear to both of us that we would give anything to be near each other again.
  • I feel like I could score anywhere from a 490 to a 520 on the MCAT, lol. Gotta keep my options open just in case.
Having gone thru BSMD process (and securing an admission) You know the drill and you will be fine. I know @KnightDoc will disagree with that :)
 
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KnightDoc

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I know I've said this like three times, but firstly: thank you sincerely for believing in my application, unique backstory and all, flaws and all.

I used to research pre-med requirements all the time in high school before I got into UMKC, so yeah, I pretty much hit the ground running the second I transferred. I just wrapped up my sophomore year and created long-lasting opportunities for myself in terms of non-clinical volunteering, clinical volunteering and experience, research, healthcare employment, leadership, etc. I also have a few unique ECs (like interning for a political campaign, because my major is Public Policy Administration and I'm interested in that). Shadowing is 125+ hours, etc, etc, you know the drill. I'm worried about my clinical hours because of the pandemic, so will probably take a gap year.

I'm primarily considering DO schools for a couple of reasons:
  • Prestige is not a huge deal to me. My heart is in primary care or psychiatry, underserved communities, public health more so than research, etc. I do love research, though, and would definitely reap the benefits of a research-oriented school.
  • I want to maximize my chances of being near my boyfriend again, whether MD or DO. He's wrapping up his second year at UMKC, and us doing long-distance has made it clear to both of us that we would give anything to be near each other again.
  • I feel like I could score anywhere from a 490 to a 520 on the MCAT, lol. Gotta keep my options open just in case.
There is no substitute for a great support system (as I'm sure you are VERY well aware!), but I urge you not to limit choices based on geography because you're locked into long distance for at least another 2 years in any event, and, if it's meant to be, you'll make it work. He'll be graduating while you are in your first or second year somewhere, so that's another opportunity for geographic proximity.

I'll just share with you what my parents tell me (I'm also interested in primary care at this point, as I've been since I was little) -- you don't know where life will take you once you are exposed to everything in med school, so position yourself for the highest likelihood to have the most opportunities, whether academic research, a pediatric specialty, public health in a clinic in a strip mall, etc. If you turn down MD for DO to be near BF, it might work out great, or you might regret it for the rest of your life, depending on what you want to do 4 years later and whether the DO will provide the opportunity. I'd really think carefully about that. It's not about prestige for many of us, you included, but it IS about exposure to opportunities, networking, etc.

You are absolutely all over being a successful, competitive applicant at the very best schools in the country (depending, of course, on MCAT -- no pressure :)), with far better ECs than me (other than clinical lol -- I'm looking at a gap year to fill in the research and leadership I am presently lacking due to COVID) and humility is always an appreciated character trait, but your profile suggests you will be a lot closer to 520 than 510, let alone 490. Please forget DO for your first cycle.
 
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Having gone thru BSMD process (and securing an admission) You know the drill and you will be fine. I know @KnightDoc will disagree with that :)
Not in this case -- if she were contemplating applying now with AP credits, sure, but she knows exactly what she is doing (amazingly, it precisely tracks what I am doing, minus the withdrawal from a 6 year program, but she has WAY better ECs than I do! :)).
 
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brockhamptonfanacct

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There is no substitute for a great support system (as I'm sure you are VERY well aware!), but I urge you not to limit choices based on geography because you're locked into long distance for at least another 2 years in any event, and, if it's meant to be, you'll make it work. He'll be graduating while you are in your first or second year somewhere, so that's another opportunity for geographic proximity.

I'll just share with you what my parents tell me (I'm also interested in primary care at this point, as I've been since I was little) -- you don't know where life will take you once you are exposed to everything in med school, so position yourself for the highest likelihood to have the most opportunities, whether academic research, a pediatric specialty, public health in a clinic in a strip mall, etc. If you turn down MD for DO to be near BF, it might work out great, or you might regret it for the rest of your life, depending on what you want to do 4 years later and whether the DO will provide the opportunity. I'd really think carefully about that. It's not about prestige for many of us, you included, but it IS about exposure to opportunities, networking, etc.

You are absolutely all over being a successful, competitive applicant at the very best schools in the country (depending, of course, on MCAT -- no pressure :)), with far better ECs than me (other than clinical lol -- I'm looking at a gap year to fill in the research and leadership I am presently lacking due to COVID) and humility is always an appreciated character trait, but your profile suggests you will be a lot closer to 520 than 510, let alone 490. Please forget DO for your first cycle.

You do raise compelling points--points that I have heard and perhaps should pay closer attention to. My boyfriend is similar to you in that while he would love for us to close the gap again, he is firmly in favor of me taking the best opportunity I can get and running with it (I'm a lucky girl with this one). I'll simply have to see how the MCAT goes! And best of luck with your applications and gap year--I imagine a fruitful cycle for you, given how knowledgeable and eloquent you are.
 
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KnightDoc

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You do raise compelling points--points that I have heard and perhaps should pay closer attention to. My boyfriend is similar to you in that while he would love for us to close the gap again, he is firmly in favor of me taking the best opportunity I can get and running with it (I'm a lucky girl with this one). I'll simply have to see how the MCAT goes! And best of luck with your applications and gap year--I imagine a fruitful cycle for you, given how knowledgeable and eloquent you are.
Thanks!! I appear to be way more knowledgeable than I actually am, given that I haven't been through a cycle yet but have been hanging out here for over a year. :) I studied certain things like PTE/CTE to death, and have opinions about certain other things, but I really don't know any more than anyone else going through it, and a lot less than those who have completed the process. I am as nervous as anyone, and will know more once I take the MCAT, but am worried about the unspectacular and very typical nature of my ECs.

I appreciate your kind thoughts and am glad you found my advice useful. Given that I don't know you or your BF, and he is saying exactly what I am, yes, you should consider yourself lucky, definitely keep him, but do not shortchange yourself for short term comfort and convenience. Play the long game -- you both have your entire lives ahead of you. The fact that someone very close to you and a random stranger on SDN are giving you exactly the same advice should be a sign.
 
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brockhamptonfanacct

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Thanks!! I appear to be way more knowledgeable than I actually am, given that I haven't been through a cycle yet but have been hanging out here for over a year. :) I studied certain things like PTE/CTE to death, and have opinions about certain other things, but I really don't know any more than anyone else going through it, and a lot less than those who have completed the process. I am as nervous as anyone, and will know more once I take the MCAT, but am worried about the unspectacular and very typical nature of my ECs.

I appreciate your kind thoughts and am glad you found my advice useful. Given that I don't know you or your BF, and he is saying exactly what I am, yes, you should consider yourself lucky, definitely keep him, but do not shortchange yourself for short term comfort and convenience. Play the long game -- you both have your entire lives ahead of you. The fact that someone very close to you and a random stranger on SDN are giving you exactly the same advice should be a sign.

I'm sure you've heard the adage regarding how it's less how what you did and more how you talk about it. :) I will keep your thoughts in mind. Thank you again!
 
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brockhamptonfanacct

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Is this your first time filling out an AMCAS application? If yes, I don't believe you are a "reapplicant" to MD schools.

Yes, it will be my first time filling out either AMCAS or AACOMAS. Would you advise me to stick with what UMKC has said due to their focus on integration of curriculum, or would you categorize this differently?

I'd like to be as honest as possible, but I don't want to misrepresent myself, as the extent of my medical coursework was, as I said, learning how to take patient histories and examining bioethical perspectives.

Also, if I were to answer yes, I did matriculate, would that be something that could potentially get my app screened out without being looked at otherwise?
 

brockhamptonfanacct

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If you have previously matriculated to a US medical school, you'd have a AMCAS application (or the equivalent in the Texas system). You don't have that so I can't see how you can be classified as a reappliant never mind a former matriculant to medical school.

I had one more quick question; thanks in advance for your time. Since UMKC has told me to say yes, I am at a loss as to do what to do, because I don't want a school I apply to to call UMKC and think I am lying/deliberately obscuring something (everything will be on my transcripts and I will fully address it). Do you have any recommendation for what I should do, so as to maintain honesty but also be clear in that I acknowledge what UMKC told me to do?
 

LizzyM

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Schools are not going to call UMKC. They can see your list of classes. They can see that you took your first year of undergraduate work at UMKC. No one belives that one's first year of undergraduate work is "medical school".

But here's an idea: Ask UMKC if you were listed on a roster in the AAMC student roster system. Student Records System (SRS)
 
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brockhamptonfanacct

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Schools are not going to call UMKC. They can see your list of classes. They can see that you took your first year of undergraduate work at UMKC. No one belives that one's first year of undergraduate work is "medical school".

But here's an idea: Ask UMKC if you were listed on a roster in the AAMC student roster system. Student Records System (SRS)

Thank you! I will do so.
 

brockhamptonfanacct

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Schools are not going to call UMKC. They can see your list of classes. They can see that you took your first year of undergraduate work at UMKC. No one belives that one's first year of undergraduate work is "medical school".

But here's an idea: Ask UMKC if you were listed on a roster in the AAMC student roster system. Student Records System (SRS)

Just wanted to follow up and say thank you for this idea - the registrar confirmed that I was not listed as a matriculated student, as I left at the Year 1 level! I appreciate you commenting so much!
 
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