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Cognovi

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sallyhasanidea

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I'm guessing your PhD was in something oncology related? What made you less interested in oncology as a career if that is the case?

I'm a fourth year myself so probably not best suited to answer your questions. I can say that regarding timeline, ERAS is uploaded 10/21 which gives you about 4 months; to get a project started to completion, submitted, reviewed, etc. is probably not realistic. But if it worries you, you could probably reach out to your department and ask around if there are any projects you could contribute to, explain your situation, and maybe get some coauthorships.
 
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GadRads

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UCSF/Stanford MD/PhD with Nature pubs? Decent steps and assuming your clinical grades are ok, you'll get an invite from (almost) every top program in the country.

Agree.

OP will match at a good program.

Radiology is what you put into it. Don't get hung up on program prestige. When the time comes, rank based on location and happiness.
 
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redalert

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BTW, don't worry about your molecular background and how it fits in with radiology. Plenty of people with basic science research match into radiology all the time. Molecular imaging and nuclear medicine also heavily involve wet lab and I'm sure you can spin the answer to "why radiology" that way if you want. But most likely people won't really care as much about what you did your PhD in as you being a productive resident.
 

bobjonesbob

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@strandedontheisland I suggest editing your original post to be less identifying.

As far as your app, you should match one of the top California programs (UCSF, Stanford, UCLA, UCSD). It would be a good idea to get to know the people in your home department - get involved with the interest group and pick up a small research project or case report.
 
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strandedontheisland

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I'm guessing your PhD was in something oncology related? What made you less interested in oncology as a career if that is the case?

I'm a fourth year myself so probably not best suited to answer your questions. I can say that regarding timeline, ERAS is uploaded 10/21 which gives you about 4 months; to get a project started to completion, submitted, reviewed, etc. is probably not realistic. But if it worries you, you could probably reach out to your department and ask around if there are any projects you could contribute to, explain your situation, and maybe get some coauthorships.

I'm actually an MS3 but that's still helpful in that I'll try to get involved now rather than starting in 4th year. Thanks! My PhD wasn't in oncology, but my interest in DR is more about enjoying the visual/cerebral aspects of radiology + the role of a doctor's consultant over direct patient care, moreso than losing interest in something else.

BTW, don't worry about your molecular background and how it fits in with radiology. Plenty of people with basic science research match into radiology all the time. Molecular imaging and nuclear medicine also heavily involve wet lab and I'm sure you can spin the answer to "why radiology" that way if you want. But most likely people won't really care as much about what you did your PhD in as you being a productive resident.

Thanks, that's reassuring! I actually find nuclear/molecular imaging fascinating in how they are able to tie physiology to imaging, but from what I've read here the job market seems to be very poor unfortunately.
 

Cognovi

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Thanks, that's reassuring! I actually find nuclear/molecular imaging fascinating in how they are able to tie physiology to imaging, but from what I've read here the job market seems to be very poor unfortunately.
Yea but if you're looking at academic nuclear radiology with 80% research time, the broader job market should not be a factor. Academia's about finding a niche.

If I were in your shoes I would not try to get into some clinical project you won't care about. Spin your application to make you look like the next Sam Gambhir, Umar Mahmood, Ralph Weissleder, Dave Mankoff. Radiologist-molecular scientists extraordinaire.

You're worrying too much for someone who will most likely stay at your home institution.
 
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.Lisfranc

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Hey guys, I'm an incoming M3 starting rotations soon and really interested in DR, hoping I could get some advice on preparing an application for rads and also getting some specific advice for my situation (MD/PhD student).

I have about 6 wet lab pubs including a first-author Nature manuscript. Step 1 score was 24x, but aiming for a 260+ on CK. I'm at a top California school, and hoping to stay in California. Besides that, probably will do just average in clinic as my personality isn't really suited towards clerkship evaluation methods (for the same reasons why I think I'm a good match for DR)

My questions are:

1. I plan to do a radiology elective but other than that don't have much contact with my department. Do you think it's important to get involved in doing some radiology research despite having an above-average PhD output that is non-radiology related?

2. How do rads programs view MD/PhD candidates? My PhD was in something molecular (not physics/engineering) but did tangentially involve a disease that heavily relies on radiological imaging for diagnosis/monitoring. I am not sure if programs will be questioning why a molecular MD/PhD would be interested in rads.

3. Overall chances for me?

Thank you so much!

You will be highly sought after at academic programs.
 
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Dave1980

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How do rads programs view MD/PhD candidates? My PhD was in something molecular (not physics/engineering) but did tangentially involve a disease that heavily relies on radiological imaging for diagnosis/monitoring. I am not sure if programs will be questioning why a molecular MD/PhD would be interested in rads.

I wouldn't try to spin this too hard or else you will sound disingenuous. I can imagine it "I studied the receptor proteins on the south american fruit fly because they are actually the same proteins involved in MS and Radiology plays a big role in MS."
 
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