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30+ MCAT Study Habits- The CBT Version

Discussion in 'MCAT Discussions' started by omegaxx, Feb 18, 2007.

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  1. MassFX

    MassFX

    15
    3
    Jan 6, 2015
    Pirate Ship
    I am honored to be able to post in this thread. Sadly, this thread will soon be obsolete, as there will doubtless be a new thread for the MCAT2015.

    1. My individual scores and composite score:

    37 composite, 13 PS, 11 VR, 13 BS.

    2. The study method I used for each section:

    All Three Sections:

    I took AAMC practice exams using the e-MCAT website. For the first 3 practice exams, I had solutions on and I had it untimed. After answering each question, I would click "show solution". If I got the question correct and it was obvious, I would skip it. If I got the question wrong, or if I had been torn about the answer choice, I would carefully read the solution.

    Verbal Reasoning:

    Taking AAMC practice exams was my only preparation. I really wish I had browsed these forums and learned the high-yield tips and tricks for Verbal, I think I could have scored higher.

    Physical and Biological Sciences:

    On the AAMC practice exams, I would make a note of every question I got wrong and the subject matter contained in the question. For instance, I might note "IR spectroscopy". I would study these topics later.

    I mostly used Wikipedia to fill in gaps in my knowledge. Some examples of things I had to look up: Snell's law of refraction, IR spectroscopy, proton NMR, ELISA, single cell electrode potentials, and the cell cycle (S-phase, etc.).

    I wrote several text files of things to memorize.

    3. What materials did I use for each section?

    Mostly just AAMC practice tests. Also Wikipedia and MIT OpenCourseWare.

    4. Which practice tests did I use?

    I used the official AAMC practice exams, and that's it.

    5. What was my undergraduate major?

    Chemistry.

    6. Any other tips I may have for those of you with the test still lurking over you?

    Pay attention in college. Especially in intro chemistry and intro physics.

    Study for more than 60 hours. I did not study enough, I am sure I could have scored higher.

    7. How long did I study for the MCAT?

    About 60 hours total over 4 weeks. About 5 hours per week for 2 weeks (while also working full-time), and then 25 hours per week for 2 weeks (while on vacation).
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2015
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  3. QCKing

    QCKing 2+ Year Member

    17
    1
    Feb 5, 2015
    Thanks !
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2015
  4. JuanPabloCastel

    JuanPabloCastel Not even close to my real name 2+ Year Member

    138
    108
    Jul 15, 2012
    Midwest
    Redacted
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015
  5. TexasSurgeon

    TexasSurgeon Harvey doesn't get cotton mouf 5+ Year Member

    2,602
    1,208
    Jul 5, 2012
    Starship Enterprise
    MDApps:
    Wait why?! it was such a good post...
     
  6. Cawolf

    Cawolf 2+ Year Member

    3,348
    2,050
    Feb 26, 2013
    Hello,

    I have received a few PMs asking for how I studied for the MCAT so I thought I would condense my thoughts in one location. I also took a lot of inspiration from this thread when I was planning my studying so I hope that I can pay it forward a little (if this post actually helps anyone!).

    1) Your individual scores and composite score

    I took a January 2015 exam.

    40+

    2) The study method used for each section

    I ultimately decided that self-studying was right for me and went with a highly modified version of SN2ed's study plan. I felt that there would be a lot of value in subject matter rotation - to keep things interesting and promote retention. The modifications I made were to adjust the study plan to my personal needs. I had just completed Bio, Chem, Physics, and Orgo 1 - so I felt strong on content in these areas. I had yet to take Orgo 2, so I focused a fair amount of energy into this section. I cut the EK material because it mostly seemed derivative to the more in-depth TBR materials.

    I rotated through the TBR chapters during the semester. I found that doing a quick read through and tackling 1/3 of the chapter's passages took me about 3 hours (sometimes 4). I spent 3 months working slowly through the chapters and completing 1/3 of all the passages.

    For verbal I used TPRH verbal passages and did about 75 practice passages through the 4 months I studied. I had also purchased EK 101, but did not like the passages and grew weary of doing them. I think the biggest contribution to my verbal success (in my eyes) was subscribing to The New Yorker. I did this 3 months before I started studying and forced myself to read everything I did not find interesting. I then tried to come up with possible questions and think critically about what I had read. These were not formal practice passages, but I think that it was quite useful.

    Over the last month of my 4 months of studying I was relatively full-time. I did all of the AAMC exams, a few more TPRH passages, watched videos on YouTube, and listed to EK audio osmosis. I did not do any more passages for the sciences outside of the AAMC exams. I mostly tried to immerse myself in the material and gain a deeper understanding of MCAT-style questions.

    I also spent a fair amount of time in the Q&A section on these forums. During my studies I made just under 500 posts in that sub-forum. I think that "teaching" the material and "discussing" it with others really helped a lot. I would highly suggest doing that, especially if there are questions on material you aren't perfect with.


    3) What materials you used for each section

    VR: TPRH Verbal
    PS: TBR
    BS: TBR

    4) Which practice tests did you use?

    All of the AAMC tests - great investment.

    Scores:
    #3: 33 (12 PS/11 VR/10 BS) (Taken as a diagnostic, before any organic courses - baseline)
    #4: 39 (13 PS/13 VR/13 BS)
    #5: 34 (12 PS/10 VR/12 BS)
    #7: 39 (13 PS/13 VR/13 BS)
    #8: 36 (13 PS/12 VR/11 BS)
    #9: 37 (14 PS/ 11 VR/12 BS)
    #10: 40 (13 PS/12 VR/15 BS)
    #11: 40 (13 PS/12 VR/15 BS)
    AAMC average (not including #3): 38 (3 points below my actual score!)

    5) What is your undergraduate major?

    Non-science in 2008.

    6) Any other tips you may have for those of us who still have this test lurking over us?

    It is hard to say with the style of the MCAT changing now. I think that the best advice I would give anyone is to really spend a good amount of time making sure you actually understand the material. Memorizing might get you to a great score in the mid 30's, but having a deeper understanding of the material and the question style is required to progress from there. I would learn everything and explain it to others to reinforce it within yourself. Very little actual content memorization was required for this exam.

    7) How long did you study for the MCAT?

    I studied for 4 months. The first 3 months I was in school (taking orgo 1) so I did 5 days a week for about 3 hours. The last month I was out of school and did about 6 hours a day, 5 days a week. I estimate that I spent about 300 - 350 hours preparing for this exam. I felt that was adequate.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2015
  7. y123

    y123 5+ Year Member

    382
    181
    May 6, 2011
    1) Your individual scores and composite score
    PS=14 VR=10 BS=15 Composite=39

    2) The study method used for each section
    PS: For physics, I started doing passages after reviewing the equations. I did not do content review for physics.
    For general chemistry, I did many passages on Berkeley and hyperlearning. I finished content review using Berkeley. I feel it is too dense. I would not recommend it.
    BS: I took MCAT while I was taking orgo 1, so orgo 1 is really fresh to me. I taught myself orgo 2 topics using Examcracker in the winter break. It is sufficient enough.
    For bio, I did Berkeley and Hyperlearning passages after I finished content review on Examcracker.
    VR: I practiced a lot using Examcracker and Hyperleaerning workbook.

    3) What materials you used for each section(Kaplan, TPR, Examkrackers, AAMC, etc)
    TPRH verbal and science workbooks
    Berkeley
    Examkracker

    4) Which practice tests did you use?
    All AAMC FLs and nothing else

    5) What was your undergraduate major?
    Biology and chemistry

    6) Any other tips you may have for those of us who still have this test lurking over us?
    Verbal is hard.
    Overstudy for the MCAT. Do a lot of passages. Don't rush to take it. You don't want to waste your time and money taking the MCAT when you are not fully prepared.
    Try not to study for the MCAT and take many difficult courses at the same time.
    If you are a top student from a top school, you probably can spend much less time on it. If you are from an average school, then the MCAT is probably harder than your coursework.

    7) How long did you study for the MCAT?
    4 months and a half. At least 30 hours each week.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2015
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  8. razzmatazz87

    razzmatazz87 2+ Year Member

    102
    30
    Feb 4, 2014
    1) Your individual scores and composite score
    PS 12 VR 10 BS 12 Composite=34

    2) The study method used for each section
    PS - lots of content review, my hardest section by far. Trying to understand concepts
    BS - vocab/re-fresher, content review
    VR - lots of EK practice tests, 101 verbal passages was solid

    3) What materials you used for each section(Kaplan, TPR, Examkrackers, AAMC, etc)
    TPRH verbal/science workbooks; science was most impt to me so I really used it
    Examkrackers was best for verbal, probably a little too in depth for sciences but if I was hazy I reviewed it for more in depth
    Kaplan ehh...not a huge fan, its ok
    AAMC practice tests, like all of them

    4) Which practice tests did you use?
    All the AAMC tests, expensive but worth it

    5) What was your undergraduate major?
    Health science, Spanish minor

    6) Any other tips you may have for those of us who still have this test lurking over us?
    Practice tests are important-get used to the test format and timing. Timing is super important, start early.
    I feel like verbal is usually my best section but ehh, do what you can.
    Know your formulas, and practice educated guessing (eliminate obvious wrong answers, try to reason to find the right ones)
    STUDY lots

    7) How long did you study for the MCAT?
    ~5 months, more or less. I started in gradually with 2-3 hours a day, bumped it up each month to 6-7 hours the last month.
    Take one day off a week for your sanity.
     
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  9. 30hellishdays

    30hellishdays

    15
    17
    Jan 18, 2015
    1) Your individual scores and composite score:
    30 (P9/V10/B11)

    2) The study method used for each section.
    I'll preface by saying I do not recommend my study plan. In a nutshell: 3 weeks content review + 1 week practice tests, for a mid-January test. A month isn't much, but combined with my undergraduate studying I felt decently prepared content-wise. I wish I would have taken more timed practice tests to get myself more accustomed to the overall format.

    3) What materials you used for each section.
    Exam Krackers 7e for all subjects (Orgo, Gen Chem, Physics, Bio).

    4) Which practice tests did you use?
    I took AAMC FL #8, #9, & #3, scoring 29, 30, & 31 respectively. Only #3 was taken under timed conditions.

    5) What was your undergraduate major?
    Biology

    6) Any other tips you may have for those of us who still have this test lurking over us?
    I believe my story is a good example of how to barely get by with MCAT studying but still hit the 30 mark. I honestly think I could have done much better had I not crammed so much material into such a small window. This is especially true for PS, which I hear is the easiest section to bring up. With a tighter strategy I would have taken all of the AAMC practice exams, interspersed throughout 2-3 months of studying. Not sure how useful any of this is for the new 2015 format, but yeah.

    7) How long did you study for the MCAT?
    1 month + previously taken pre-req's. I walked out of the exam feeling as if I scored higher, but I guess what they say about AAMC averages is true. I'm just happy to be done. Best of luck to those taking the new format exam, be sure to rock it!
     
  10. krukshanks

    krukshanks 2+ Year Member

    111
    82
    May 1, 2013
    Saint Louis
    1) Your individual scores and composite score

    I took a January 2015 exam.

    39- 14PS/11VR/14BS

    2) The study method used for each section

    Before I make any points, I want to stress that I am not recommending any specific studying method: After doing the MCAT prep myself, I realized that the studying method is highly personalized: SDN offers a lot of good resources such as the SN2ed schedule etc., but none of the schedules or methods should be regarded as Bible. I can't stress more that you have to first judge your background and figure out what your weaknesses are and then arrange your schedule according to your own strengths and weaknesses.

    I did not take any MCAT prep-courses and studied everything myself. I chose this method because my science background was relatively strong, and I'd say I know 70% of the content pretty well before I started studying for the MCAT, and the rest I have a vague idea. Therefore, when I did my content review, I did not spend too much time focusing on the big ideas, but rather directly dug into the details. I prepared a notebook to note down the tiny bits and pieces that I did not know before from my prep books and review those bits and pieces before I go to sleep. I went through this process twice, once during last summer and once during the last two weeks right before my Jan.13th exam.

    For verbal, what I could say is that you really have to practice. But still, you need to figure out what your weaknesses are. I did the first full practice in EK verbal 101 as a diagnosis, and I scored an 8 for high error rate and running out of time. Therefore I realized that I had to raise my reading speed and get used to the MCAT verbal mindset. I took a course in History of Religion the coming semester, which involved a ton of convoluted reading in philosophy/religion, and being "tortured" by those readings for one whole semester really made the VR articles on non-philosophy topics 100 times easier. I also made notes next to the VR questions I missed, and I kept asking myself why I missed the question, and compare my explanation to the official explanations. Over time, the way you think will get closer and closer to the MCAT way of thinking. There is one thing I really need to point out: you could possibly cram for the PS and BS sections, but you can in no way do that for VR, so you have to start early and do a passage/a couple passages every week, so that you gradually adjust to the mindset.

    In addition, I'd like to quote a pre-med friends words here: "If you are not doing problems, you are not studying for the MCAT". This can't be better said. If you want to learn the material, you have to do problems. Just reading the books won't help you.


    3) What materials you used for each section

    VR: EK Verbal 101, AAMC Self-Assessment Package
    I did the first 12 tests out of a total of 14. I won't say EK has the identical logic as the real test, so the AAMC tests are always your best friend! AAMC self-assessment reflects a way of thinking much closer to the real thing. Highly recommend.
    PS: EK + TBR for Content Review, TBR Passages + EK 1001 for practice
    EK has a more complete list of topics, while TBR does a better job explaining some of the concepts. I'd say use EK for first-round main idea review, and if you are still confused about some topics, go find the corresponding chapters in TBR. Also, TBR's section on organic chemistry laboratory techniques is PRICELESS. TBR's PS passages are also wonderful resources.
    BS: EK + TBR, TBR Passages + EK 1001 for practice
    EK is less detailed and less capable of explaining stuff clearly, but it is more readable (because of its more manageable length). TBR does a better job explaining stuff, especially for cardiovascular system and respiration. Some people say EK excludes some details that are required for the MCAT and you have to read TBR completely for a good BS score. This is not right. In fact, sometimes when you think you "missed a detail because the book did not mention it", it is actually because you did not understand the mechanism already brought up in the book well enough to deduce it. TBR is almost too detail-oriented, which can be reflected in both content review and its passages (which is why I later switched to EK passages).

    4) Which practice tests did you use?

    All AAMC Practice Tests. Great practice.

    5) What is your undergraduate major?

    Chemical and Physical Biology (basically MCB with a more rigorous requirement for math and physics)

    6) Any other tips you may have for those of us who still have this test lurking over us?

    Studying with a friend helps! It is good to discuss over some hard concepts/VR questions, and this really helps a lot.
    Also, rule one from the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: DON'T PANIC! Lots of people will tell you MCAT is a big monster and you have to spend 3 months/half a year/one whole summer without research/clinical activities to study for it and that Verbal will eat you during your dreams. That is bull****. I am not even a native speaker of English: if I can get away with verbal, you can do it too!

    7) How long did you study for the MCAT?

    I studied for about 3 weeks over last summer (was planning to take it in September and ended up voiding the test) and 2 weeks before my January test. 5 weeks total. [I don't recommend squishing everything into such a small window if it makes you uncomfortable though! I did this only because I have basically finished all my pre-med requirements in a very rigorous ways due to my major.]
     
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  11. yaboy

    yaboy 2+ Year Member

    14
    13
    Oct 26, 2014
    1) Your individual scores and composite score

    I took a January 2015 exam.

    38- 12PS/11VR/15BS

    2) The study method used for each section

    I got a 15 in BS because I absolutely refuse to accept old tests or any type of cheating. I learn all the material required as a BIO major and it sticks. If you want to succeed on this thing you need to form an encyclopedia of information. There's no other way. I read Berkeley Review, Kaplan, Princeton review, and Exam crackers.


    4) Which practice tests did you use?

    All AAMC Practice Tests. Kaplan Practice Tests, a couple Gold Standard, a couple princeton review, all 7 BR CBT's

    5) What is your undergraduate major?

    Bio

    6) Any other tips you may have for those of us who still have this test lurking over us?

    1 day at a time

    7) How long did you study for the MCAT?

    6 months (5 months so-so, last month was christmas break hard core)
     
  12. JulioJones

    JulioJones 2+ Year Member

    124
    101
    Jun 4, 2014
    1) Your individual scores and composite score
    PS12-V12-BS11 (35) January 10th,2015

    2) The study method used for each section
    Read 1 Chapter a day Monday through Friday in my review books rotating through subjects with 5-10 practice passages on those days (1.5-2 hours a day), practice verbal and bio passages saturday (2 hours), off sunday. Didn't use a verbal book other than passages, and slacked off O-Chem.

    3) What materials you used for each section
    TBR for all but Bio, used EK for bio w/ their question book too, TBR was too intense for that. And EK 101 passages for verbal (don't judge the scores, just use for practice)

    4) Which practice tests did you use?
    The Berkley Review 1-5 (Great practice, scores scared me at first but when I switched to AAMC my scores were immediately higher so that was a relief)
    AAMC3 for diagnostic, and 4-11 at the end 33 avg

    5) What was your undergraduate major?
    Biology, but spent a lot of time as a physics and chem tutor so that helped PS quite a bit.

    6) Any other tips you may have for those of us who still have this test lurking over us?
    I think setting a goal (slightly above what you think is realistic) and keeping that goal in mind and visualizing seeing that score really helped me make the difference in improving on test day from my practice average. That and just reminding myself its nothing but a test really helped, I had a near freak out half way through verbal cause I got stuck on a passage and my timing got off, made myself stop, close my eyes and take 3 deep breaths, and got back into it, and finished with 5 minutes to spare and scored the highest score I had on a test in Verbal. Oh and I went to a science museum the day before the exam to relax, and there were at least 3 or 4 questions on my exam that having not visited the museum would have been difficult!

    7) How long did you study for the MCAT?
    A semester (16 weeks, 10 hours a week give or take depending on school schedule) and 3 weeks of practice tests over winter break.
     
  13. MaybeDr

    MaybeDr 2+ Year Member

    271
    151
    Apr 7, 2014
    .
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  14. typoncho

    typoncho 2+ Year Member

    148
    163
    Jul 2, 2014
    Glad I finally get to post on here.

    1) Your individual scores and composite score

    05/31/14: PS: 8/VR: 8/BR: 10/Comp: 26

    01/13/15: PS: 11/VR:12/BR: 10/Comp: 33


    2) The study method used for each section

    First attempt: Studied for about 4 weeks after spring semester and took the exam. Used Kaplan books for all sections, raced through it, and got the score that I rightly deserved. I took AAMC 11 right before the exam and got a 26, so very predictive.

    Second attempt: I got angry and determined to beat the test. I was taking 20 credit hours of upper level while studying for it, but dedicated most of my time to studying for it for four months. The first 2.5 months was spent going back over the Kaplan books and making flashcards of all high yield info/and all formulas along the way. Main focus was on Gen Chem and Physics since that was my weakness. I set up an excel spreadsheet of chapters that I needed done each day. I would have used SN2, but I didn’t have four months of full on dedication. I stuck with my schedule and it paid off. Every Saturday I would take a timed Exam Krackers VR test, then go over it. I also purchased the EK 1001 series to work on my biggest weaknesses. The test is for critical thinking as they say, but you’re high if you think you can critically think your way through it with holes in your content review. The last 1.5 month, I had a three day cycle: Day 1: AAMC practice test, then relax. Day 2: Go over the test for why I got questions right, and why I got them wrong, then review flash cards. Day 3: Go over flash cards, EK 1001 practice.


    3) What materials you used for each section:

    Kaplan review books, EK 1001 series, EK 101 Verbal, AAMC Self Assessment


    4) Which practice tests did you use?

    AAMC

    Average: 31.5


    5) What was your undergraduate major?

    Biology


    6) Any other tips you may have for those of us who still have this test lurking over us?


    Saturate yourself with the material for PS and BS sections. I felt like making flashcards of all high yield info really helped me in the end, as I was able to go over them daily when I was in the last stretch taking practice exams. For VR, the only thing that really helps is practice. Practice as much as you can so that you can get a feel for VR. It’s a big, nasty test. You have to own it or it will own you. You can’t half ass it, and you can’t take shortcuts. Study HARD in the beginning with content review, and it will pay off huge for you in the end and you can coast on in to your test day. MCAT prep is VERY front loaded if you do it right in my opinion. With that method, I was able to increase my score by 7 points and beat the odds.


    7) How long did you study for the MCAT?

    First attempt: 4 weeks

    Second attempt: 4 months
     
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  15. StudyLater

    StudyLater 2+ Year Member

    1,994
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    Jan 4, 2015
    I'd like to put in a request to either edit the name of this thread or start a new thread for 510+ on the MCAT2015.
     
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  16. TexasSurgeon

    TexasSurgeon Harvey doesn't get cotton mouf 5+ Year Member

    2,602
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    Starship Enterprise
    MDApps:
    Have the percentiles already been released?
     
  17. StudyLater

    StudyLater 2+ Year Member

    1,994
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    No. Not until the Apr 17 (if I have that correct) scores are released (2 months later). Change the score to whatever fits, but regardless I just want to make sure we've got it here for when the scores come in (June).
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2015
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  18. intrepid19

    intrepid19 2+ Year Member

    11
    7
    Feb 14, 2015
    1) Your individual scores and composite score
    PS=12 VR=12 BS=12 Composite=36 (Took my MCAT in Jan 2015, so I took the old test)

    2) The study method used for each section
    PS: I made sure I knew all the equations and basic concepts of physics and chemistry backwards and forwards. Practiced AAMC questions again and again.

    BS: I have a stronger bio background, so I didn’t need to review as thoroughly. Practiced AAMC questions again and again.

    VR: I sound like a broken record, but I practiced AAMC questions again and again. I especially practiced looking for the main idea.

    3) What materials you used for each section(Kaplan, TPR, Examkrackers, AAMC, etc)
    My breakthrough in studying was when I realized that the MCAT tested the application of really straightforward concepts. Before then I was practicing really difficult problems from Princeton Review, Kaplan, etc. and I was only scoring at most 33. I began hitting 35 and 36, after I made sure I had my basics down and began only focusing on AAMC questions. In the end, no test prep company can compare to the AAMC’s question style.

    4) Which practice tests did you use?
    At first I used Kaplan, but then I simply focused on all AAMC tests. When I finished them, I did them again. I still learned new things every time.


    5) What was your undergraduate major?
    Biology Major, Chemistry Minor

    6) Any other tips you may have for those of us who still have this test lurking over us?
    Realize that the test is just a test. It’s conquerable. You can do it.


    In addition, I want to make this post applicable for people taking the new 2015 MCAT. I believe that, even more so for you guys than for me, the AAMC material is really the material that you should be focusing on. I understand that there isn’t that much out there right now. But if test prep companies couldn’t even mimic test questions of the old MCAT after having so many years to perfect their methods, do you think they would be able to mimic test questions of the new MCAT? Get your hands on any and all AAMC material. I hear that they have partnered with Khan Academy. Watch all the videos and take notes. You can supplement with other materials if you need, but not before you exhaust AAMC like no other. I really don't think you should save the AAMC material until the end. You’re limiting your learning ability if you do. Resist the temptation to simply take practice tests to “see where you stand.”


    Also, don’t underestimate the importance of knowing your basics inside and out. Having equations and concepts on the tip of my tongue really made the difference for me on test day. I am NOT good and standard test taking, but I was able to tackle the MCAT by realizing that is a sheep in wolf’s clothing. The questions look scary, but they are actually pretty straightforward once you know the basic concept they are testing.


    So summary: know your basics, focus on AAMC, and finally practice, practice, practice



    7) How long did you study for the MCAT?
    A full summer, then I took a break during fall semester because my courseload was overwhelming, then a full winter break.
     
  19. StudyLater

    StudyLater 2+ Year Member

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    And now the ranges are :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2015
  20. efle

    efle not an elf Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 6, 2014
    ...where?
     
  21. StudyLater

    StudyLater 2+ Year Member

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    Jan 4, 2015
    I meant the ranges. Edited.
     
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  22. TexasSurgeon

    TexasSurgeon Harvey doesn't get cotton mouf 5+ Year Member

    2,602
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    Starship Enterprise
    MDApps:
    Wait really? where?!
     
  23. StudyLater

    StudyLater 2+ Year Member

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    April 22 MCAT thread, and I think the May ones will be coming along shortly. I haven't been super up to date with it lately.
     
  24. EParker37

    EParker37 Paramagician 2+ Year Member

    259
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    Texas
    MDApps:
  25. efle

    efle not an elf Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    10,587
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    Apr 6, 2014
    According to gyngyn a 509 is the new 30. Here's my conversion tables if people taking the new test want to list the equivalent old score.
     
  26. EParker37

    EParker37 Paramagician 2+ Year Member

    259
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    Which just further illustrates how difficult it is to compare the two tests. The top end of the range for a 30 was 79th percentile, the top end of 29 was 73, but now we have several scores spread across those ranges with the new test. So should a 77 drop to a 73 equivalent or a 79? I argue that it goes up, since it would fall inside the old range for 30, 507 though is closer to the other end and would be the top end for a new "29".
     
  27. efle

    efle not an elf Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

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    There's been a lot of threads on this. Majority of people will just look at "what's the closest percentile ceiling" rather than the more detailed "what old bin does this percentile ceiling lie within".
     
  28. EParker37

    EParker37 Paramagician 2+ Year Member

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    Makes sense, which is why I figured 508 would be the cutoff, but 509 isn't much different so, its sort of a toss up.
     
  29. StudyLater

    StudyLater 2+ Year Member

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    So anyway....about making a new thread for the new test...
     
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  30. efle

    efle not an elf Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

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    But do they make the new thread for 508+ scorers or 509+
     
  31. Sir.SavaLottaLife

    Sir.SavaLottaLife

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    I think they should make it for 510+ scorers, its a nice round number. Who says it has to be the equivalent score anyways? Yeah a 30 is more equivalent to a 508 or 509 but a 30 was more impressive when the thread was started. People come to the 30+ thread more to see and hear from the people who score REALLY well. This thread has been studded with 35+ MCAT scorers.

    That all being said, 510 is going to be the score people shoot for now, like a 30 was for the old MCAt. That is, you'll hear more people saying "I'm going for a 510+" than "I'm going for a 508/509". People picked 30 to shoot for because it is a round number that represented a decent chance of acceptance, not because it represented a certain percentile. In fact, the percentile of a 30 has varied considerably in the past few years.

    I just think that we should focus less on trying to equate the two tests by finding a "new 30" and just look at the two tests for what they are respectively. Like it or not, the new MCAT is a lot different from the old one.
     
  32. EParker37

    EParker37 Paramagician 2+ Year Member

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    People didn't shoot for a 30 because it was a nice round number, they shot for a 30 because that was the score for the average matriculant into medical school. And you can't have a nice round number on a non-linear scale.
     
  33. efle

    efle not an elf Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

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    Id agree 510 is good as the new threshold, but because a 31 is really the new safe-ish number this last cycle, rather than for being a nice round number
     
  34. Sir.SavaLottaLife

    Sir.SavaLottaLife

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    The median matriculant in the past few years has had an MCAT score of 31-32. The reality is people were generally a lot more happy with a 30 over a 29 than a 31 over a 30. It's just a natural threshold we respond to. We react differently to a 99 v. 100 or 89 v.90 and I don't think we can ignore that. I mean I agree that it sounds petty to use a number because it's round, I just think something to consider and its much easier than trying to figure out whether a 508=30 or a 509=30.
     
  35. supremus

    supremus 2+ Year Member

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  36. allantois

    allantois 2+ Year Member

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  37. Narmerguy

    Narmerguy Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    StudyLater likes this.

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