A Conundrum; Would love some advice.

Discussion in 'hSDN' started by Azarias59, 09.23.14.

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  1. Azarias59

    Azarias59

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    You all must be sick of seeing threads from me. :p

    I have a bit of a conundrum, and would love to see some advice.

    So, I would really love to start my pre-medical studies soon, except there's one hiccup. My parents only will pay for a 2-year education that will get me a job. And they are completely unsupportive of my ambition to pursue becoming a physician. So I thought, "Okay, I'll just use my savings to pay for my first 2 years of pre-medical at a community college" (Because if they find out I took a student loan, well, they'd kick me out.)

    But it gets better! If I start going to school for an education that won't get me a job in a mere two years, they'll not only refuse to contribute towards it, but also kick me out too!

    I cannot sway them, because they are religious fanatics. So I thought maybe we could come to a compromise. Turns out that they will be for me to go to school to become an LPN.

    My questions for you are:

    1. Should I just move out and rack up additional debt by taking out student loans to pay for my living expenses and pre-med schooling?

    OR

    2. Should I go to school to become an LPN, then try to find part-time work as an LPN, and then work towards an associates in Science (possibly dual-majoring?), after which I will continue my pre-med studies at a university.

    Also, are there any pre-med scholarships out there based on financial need? I doubt I can get federal aid because my father makes 85,000 a year (he does have nothing in savings though). Would any scholarships take that into consideration? Or would they base the financial need based on my own situation.
     
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  3. cincincyreds

    cincincyreds 5+ Year Member

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    Honestly, if you want to be a doctor, that is fine. The problem is if your parents don't support you financially, you could end up racking up a ton of debt that you can never pay back if you happen to not get into medical school. Medical school is very difficult to get into.

    You won't be getting any schlorships or federal aid.
     
  4. Strudel19

    Strudel19 5+ Year Member

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    My parents don't support my education at all - zero. They simply can't afford it. I think the difference here is if you parents can afford it and don't want you to, or if they can't afford it and they're unable to pay for a four year education. In any event, fill out a FAFSA and discuss your situation with your financial aid advisor at school. In my experiences, there is more money available then people lead you to believe.
     
  5. Evisju7

    Evisju7

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    My parents have been threatening to cut school support since I was 17. Yeah. No fun

    Okay, so here's what I would do. Do REALLY well at a two year school; your parents may see this as a sign of how serious you are and change their minds.
    If that doesn't work, switch to a 4 year school, claim yourself as independent of your parents and apply for financial aid. Hopefully you'll be able to get some little scholarships too. (I got some in community college for my bio grades. They paid for my biology classes completely)
    You will probably have to work and it will be difficult. You will need to learn how to save and live like a cheapo, so start now. Unfortunately, all that will not save you from needing loans.. but do so sparingly
     
    Winged Scapula likes this.
  6. Evisju7

    Evisju7

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    Currently, with my parents, we have a business relationship. There are very strictly set regulations as far as what is expected of me and what they will pay. Because of this, I can always go to them and "negotiate terms" ;)
     
  7. Evisju7

    Evisju7

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    My point being that eventually you can get to a point where you and your parents sit down and talk over your desires and theirs. And HOPEFULLY come to a mutually beneficial agreement
     
  8. Strudel19

    Strudel19 5+ Year Member

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    I agree with everything that was said about declaring as yourself as an independent. You'll definitely get more money that way. I also agree with the part about living like a cheapo! I know I have to!
     
  9. Evisju7

    Evisju7

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    If your parents are relatively wealthy, then it's beneficial because you will qualify for aid. But if you already qualify with your family's support considered, then it may not help too much.
     
  10. MarylandMatt

    MarylandMatt Veni Vidi Vici 2+ Year Member

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    ROTC scholarship is always an option. Have the military pay for your schooling; if you get into medical school you can then get a service deferral and even have the military pay for your medical school costs with you promising extra years of service.

    You'll live on campus with a meal plan like a normal student and even get a monthly check. You don't need your parents and you'll become the independent person it sounds like you want to become. My dad went this route from a low income family and it's allowed him to be able to put me through any schooling to accomplish my goals.
     
  11. sonofva

    sonofva 7+ Year Member

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    Why would you not do #2 and get an associates and LPN? What is the reason not to? Then get a job as an LPN and pay the rest of the way yourself with help from financial aid?
     
    Last edited: 09.28.14
  12. Azarias59

    Azarias59

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    Not going to go with the LPN route, because it will just be too difficult for me to study for classes that I really don't care about. A lot of it doesn't transfer too.

    Do you think I could get a dependency override with this situation? Because you are considered a dependent until you are 24, homeless, married, or are a parent. I never had an issue with my parents' lack of contribution. My issue is that I can't support myself and go to college without taking on a ton of debt. Since I don't have credit or a consigner, I don't image that I could ever take out a private student loan.

    Do you really think I could still get so,e form of financial aid? The FAFSA estimator tool told me that I am not eligible for any grants. I can take out 5,500 in stafford loans and I do work part time, but that is not nearly enough to pay for my schooling and board.
     
    Last edited: 10.11.14
  13. sonofva

    sonofva 7+ Year Member

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    Fair enough. I hate to break the news to you though, that if you go the med school route you'll be studying for classes you don't care about for the next 8 years at least...
     
    Stagg737 likes this.
  14. Stagg737

    Stagg737 2+ Year Member

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    I don't know where you heard this, but it's not totally accurate. You can claim yourself as independent as sons as you turn 18 in the U.S. You can choose to remain as a dependent after that, but you do not have to. There are multiple routes you can take to become a physician, none of which are easy or guaranteed to get you there. And a little harsh advice, if you can't succeed at taking classes you don't like to become an LPN, you definitely won't make it taking the classes you don't like in med school. Realize now that if you really want to be a doc you are going to have to make a lot of sacrifices and do things you don't want to in order to reach your goal.
     

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