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A Sap-Free Personal Statement?

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by trypmo, May 4, 2004.

  1. trypmo

    trypmo Arch Fiend
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    I know that putting a lot of emotional stuff into a personal statement can lead to great success, but in writing the first few drafts of my own statement, I find that I'm using more of a logical thought progression explaining why I think I'd be a good candidate for dental school, and almost no emotion comes across.

    As it is (for what it is), I think it's a pretty strong piece of writing, but I'm worried that a PS completely devoid of emotional content might be a minus to some adcoms. Do you think it might be dangerous NOT to let much passion and/or emotion show through in your PS, but rather to save it for the interviews?

    It was my first instinct to go logical, but sometimes my instincts suck. :oops:

    What do y'all think?
     
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  2. Jack Worthing

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    I went for a logical tone for most of the essay but sprinkled enthusiasm where it was appropriate. I also put a thought blurb at the beginning, in italics, of an impression I felt while observing a dentist. In that way you can separate, by font and by paragraph separation, your feelings and your "logical" essay points.

    I think the best way to insert emotion is to think of personal examples of your logical assertions. Tell a story to illustrate, or even introduce each of your points.

    As for passion in the essay vs. let it wait for the interview, hmm... I'm leaning towards put it in your essay. There'll be less pressure on you in the interview because it's in your essay; you will have thought it all through; in the interview then you'll just be reaffirming what you've written. It'll help put you in a positive light for open-file interviews in which your interviewer will read your essay.

    Best of luck! It's awesome that you're already on schedule in preparing your apps.
     
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  3. ecdoesit

    ecdoesit DDS/MS
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    How did you set bold, italics on aadsas?
     
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  4. Jack Worthing

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    Haha... good point it's been such a long time

    When I wrote my essay I did put it in italics. But looking back at my online application, yes I did lose the italics.

    I did set it apart in a separate paragraph though.
     
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  5. Jack Worthing

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    Yea, gosh looking back at my app i realize you can get away with seeming not too knowledgeable about things if the enthusiasm is there.

    In my essay when I recalled seeing my first extraction while observing a dental resident, I said the dental resident pried out the tooth with a pair of "dental pliers." After a while I've since learned the word "forceps."

    It's funny, I remember one dentist I talked to said he'd never heard of a bridge or a crown before dental school, had no idea what those were. But he's great now. NYUCD alum.
     
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  6. trypmo

    trypmo Arch Fiend
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    Thanks, Jack! I'm thinking I might need to de-dry-ify my PS a little; your point of view really makes sense.

    Anyone else (pre- or current dents) have any words of wisdom to impart on the subject?
     
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  7. HBomb

    HBomb Senior Member
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    Based on what you've written, here's what I think: it makes no sense to "save" the passion/emotion for the interview. If your intent is to project passion/emotion, go ahead and do it now in the PS. [I'm not saying the methodical, logical approach won't work either. I think you can get into dental school just as easily with the straight-shooter, logical type.] But the personal statement should tell the adcoms about who you are...and if you're the intense/emotional/passionate type, you should show it in the personal statement, especially if you're planning on projecting that in the interview (as you imply you will).
     

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