aldol16

2+ Year Member
Nov 1, 2015
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Medical Student
What part don't you get? It's a stoichiometry problem - the only caveat is that instead of having A + B ---> AB, you have n as coefficients. So let's make it more concrete by picking numbers. We'll use 2 to keep it simple - so you're making a dimer. 2 CDP ---> (CP)2 + 2 HPO4. What's the ratio of polymer (the dimer in this case) to HPO4? Well, it's 1/2. You can keep repeating this exercise - with n = 3, you'll get 1/3; with n = 4, you'll get 1/4 and so on. So the ratio of polymer to HPO4 can be obtained by the ratio 1/n.
 

Sharknad0

2+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2016
337
257
Status
Pre-Medical
What part don't you get? It's a stoichiometry problem - the only caveat is that instead of having A + B ---> AB, you have n as coefficients. So let's make it more concrete by picking numbers. We'll use 2 to keep it simple - so you're making a dimer. 2 CDP ---> (CP)2 + 2 HPO4. What's the ratio of polymer (the dimer in this case) to HPO4? Well, it's 1/2. You can keep repeating this exercise - with n = 3, you'll get 1/3; with n = 4, you'll get 1/4 and so on. So the ratio of polymer to HPO4 can be obtained by the ratio 1/n.
Is that because even though there's multiple subunits, it's just 1 mole?
 
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