Quantcast

aamc chem question pack #23

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

nostra_damus

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Messages
198
Reaction score
168

Members don't see this ad.
Can somebody explain this to me please? I'm still a little confused why the answer isn't A. Thanks!
 

Attachments

  • Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 6.45.46 PM.png
    Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 6.45.46 PM.png
    371.1 KB · Views: 95
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

nostra_damus

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Messages
198
Reaction score
168
Sorry realized I cut off the question part
 

Attachments

  • Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 6.52.36 PM.png
    Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 6.52.36 PM.png
    21.7 KB · Views: 42

aldol16

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Messages
5,435
Reaction score
4,225
What part don't you get? It's a stoichiometry problem - the only caveat is that instead of having A + B ---> AB, you have n as coefficients. So let's make it more concrete by picking numbers. We'll use 2 to keep it simple - so you're making a dimer. 2 CDP ---> (CP)2 + 2 HPO4. What's the ratio of polymer (the dimer in this case) to HPO4? Well, it's 1/2. You can keep repeating this exercise - with n = 3, you'll get 1/3; with n = 4, you'll get 1/4 and so on. So the ratio of polymer to HPO4 can be obtained by the ratio 1/n.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Sharknad0

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2016
Messages
387
Reaction score
407
What part don't you get? It's a stoichiometry problem - the only caveat is that instead of having A + B ---> AB, you have n as coefficients. So let's make it more concrete by picking numbers. We'll use 2 to keep it simple - so you're making a dimer. 2 CDP ---> (CP)2 + 2 HPO4. What's the ratio of polymer (the dimer in this case) to HPO4? Well, it's 1/2. You can keep repeating this exercise - with n = 3, you'll get 1/3; with n = 4, you'll get 1/4 and so on. So the ratio of polymer to HPO4 can be obtained by the ratio 1/n.

Is that because even though there's multiple subunits, it's just 1 mole?
 
Top