aamc VI bio questions

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sdnstud

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can someone help me with these questions?

#175) Would an exogenous gene introduced into somatic cells be passed from parent to offspring?

i put answer C (No, because changes to somatic cells are not passed to offspring). Correct answer is A (Yes, because the DNA will be localized into the cell's nuclei)

I thought only germ cells are passed to offspring. somatic cells don't go through meiosis, right?

#176) Target gene therapy to specific cells important because:

I put A (all cells contain , but do not express, the same genes) the correct answer is C (different cells contain different genes)

don't all cells have same dna thus same genes? it's the way genes are expressed that diff the cells right?
 

UCLAstudent

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Actually, I was going through these questions with my friend tonight. My answer sheet says that the correct answers are what YOU put... I think your answer guide is wrong. There is no way that a gene can be passed on to progeny if it doesn't affect the germ line. Every cell has the same DNA, and, therefore, the same genes. Unique cells arise from differential gene expression.

Don't worry, you are right. :)
 

premyo2002

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You have the right answers, but the problem # is wrong. The problems are 171 and 172. I just checked my copy, and the solutions manual
 

UCLAstudent

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I think the problem is that it is a different version of the test. I was looking through my friend's version tonight, and there were some questions that weren't in my version, and some of my questions weren't in his version.
 

TripleDegree

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With respect to exogenous gene introduction in a parent cell, once the foreign gene gets incorporated into the parent's genome, then it becomes an integral part of the DNA.

All cells undergo mitosis, except for the gametes that undergo meiosis. Therefore, since DNA replication is a part of mitosis, I would expect the daughter cells to carry the same genome as the parent did.

I think what does NOT get passed from parent to daughter in somatic cells are errors in transcription, translation, post-trans processing etc. But fundamental changes would be. Therefore, I would have guessed A.
 

Nuel

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Originally posted by TripleDegree
With respect to exogenous gene introduction in a parent cell, once the foreign gene gets incorporated into the parent's genome, then it becomes an integral part of the DNA.

All cells undergo mitosis, except for the gametes that undergo meiosis. Therefore, since DNA replication is a part of mitosis, I would expect the daughter cells to carry the same genome as the parent did.

I think what does NOT get passed from parent to daughter in somatic cells are errors in transcription, translation, post-trans processing etc. But fundamental changes would be. Therefore, I would have guessed A.

The questions was addressing offsprings not the parent's own daughter cells. And you are right in that errors in somatic DNA sequence are the only ones passed to daughter cells, not offspring.

I think this correct.
 

jhk43

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Whats an aromatic amine? Can an aromatic amine be a primary or secondary amine? if so, which takes precedent?

what the hells a coelom and why are we supposed to know this?

if u add heat, i guess the reaction forms the anhydride. does that mean COOHs are more stable, lower energy? why do you need to add acid then heat? why not heat,then acid?

can esters decarboxylate? only COOHs?
btw, why are beta keto acids more prone to decarboxylation?



btw, are diastomers optically active? is this an irrelevant discussion, like, do orgo people measure optical activity on diasteriomers?
 
C

Curious Tom

Where did you get those aamc older versions?
I have the revised 4-6R. I've been trying to get hold of those III-V or VI.
I'd appreciate your info.
 

UCLAstudent

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Originally posted by jhk43
Whats an aromatic amine? Can an aromatic amine be a primary or secondary amine? if so, which takes precedent?

what the hells a coelom and why are we supposed to know this?

if u add heat, i guess the reaction forms the anhydride. does that mean COOHs are more stable, lower energy? why do you need to add acid then heat? why not heat,then acid?

can esters decarboxylate? only COOHs?
btw, why are beta keto acids more prone to decarboxylation?



btw, are diastomers optically active? is this an irrelevant discussion, like, do orgo people measure optical activity on diasteriomers?

An aromatic amine is an aromatic ring with a nitrogen group incorporated into the ring structure. It cannot be a primary amine... a primary amine is NH2.

The coelem forms at the boundary between the small and large intestines. The important thing is that it is derived from the endoderm.

Diastereomers can certainly be optically active, as long as there is a chiral carbon and no symmetry.
 
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