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ABFAS 2018

Discussion in 'Podiatric Residents & Physicians' started by Redsting, Mar 12, 2018.

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  1. Redsting

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    Thoughts? I feel like it was poorly worded, terrible pictures, incomplete information on both the multiple choice and the CBPS. I felt they asked about a lot of obscure pathologies and gave answer choices where 2-3 out of 4 were right based on the information given. When is podiatry gonna get their act together? Ortho takes a fairly similar exam in terms of 8 hours, CBPS and their first time pass rate is around 95-96%. This is really embarrassing for the profession. We need new exam writers and pictures that weren’t taken of computer screens with a cell phone or that don’t look like a disposable camera took it. Pathetic.
     
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  3. josebiwasabi

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    Fully agree, several pictures look like they were taken with digital cameras from 2002, multiple X-rays were definitely taken with cell phones off of a computer screen. I also agree that many questions seemed opinion-based such as the most common complication after x procedure and three of the four options are common complications known to that specific procedure. Overall, it is a mess and not any better than the apmle exams
     
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  4. PodRappaTheRappa

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    Couldn't agree more. There wasn't any amount of studying that could have prepared me for this exam. Fixation principles, reduction techniques, procedure selection, management of complications are all things that could have been more of the focus. But no, I need to know which of these known complications is least likely to occur or, what is this structure that is so zoomed in and blurry you have no reference to what general area you're even looking at. Should have saved myself the three weeks that I spent studying...
     
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  5. jehjr

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    Generally I agree. I didn’t think it was as bad as I had feared, given pass rates. Definitely agree with multiple reasonable answers to questions. Usually two, although there was one that i am certain every answer could have been reasonable (and entirely subject to physician preference). Some of these “best choice” questions depend on which papers you choose to believe, or would ultimately come down to what works best “in your hands”.

    Frequently felt like they thought they needed to make a question harder, so they excluded the one piece of information that would be most diagnostic. So you want a lateral plain film? Best I can do is one blurry oblique.
     
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  6. jehjr

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    Also, that question about that specific total ankle implant that everyone uses is still in the exam. More relevant than ever.
     
  7. podgame1

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    Well that was rough. Agree with you all about the format and nature of questions. But at least it’s over. Anyone know what the most recent pass rates are?
    How’s the ABPM exam compared to this? Content? Considering taking that at some point
     
  8. GeauxT

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    2017 pass rates are available in the Abfas newsletter online. They have pass rates for each individual section which, if I remember correctly are around mid 60's to 70's for each section.

    What they don't have available is the overall pass rate for all 4 sections at the same time. Strictly doing rough math in my head based on the list of folks who obtained foot/rra qualification last year I'd peg it at like 33% or less.

    I didn't specifically count, but there is probably ~100 names on the foot/rra qualification list. If that's true, and it is assumed that every resident takes this test then that would put the overall pass rate in the 20's which is insane.

    If I get some time, I'll go back and do the actual calculations.
     
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  9. GeauxT

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    Just went back and did a rough calculation. It looks like 185 people passed all 4 sections last year. I know some of those people were not first time takers, but I'll still include them in the calculation. In 2017 there was 578 residency positions so that's the number we'll use for potential test takers.

    185 pass out of a possible 578 gives a total pass rate of.......32%.

    32%.


    32......%


    Good job podiatry...lol
     
  10. podgame1

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    OMG
     
  11. MyAnklesAreBroken

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    Is that foot and RF together?
     
  12. GeauxT

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    Yes, that is successful qualification for both foot and RRA. There is a reason ABFAS publishes the "pass rates" the way they do. They don't even give a percentage for successful foot qualification. Publishing pass rates for individual sections tells you ABSOLUTELY NOTHING about how candidates actually do on the test, but who in the hell is going to pay $2,000 for a test you have almost a 70% chance of NOT successfully passing.

    Looking at the list of candidates who successfully qualified for just foot I'd say it's about the same number as foot/RRA. However, I recognize A LOT of names from the class ahead of mine which means that a decent portion of those listed are retaking the exam.

    I would venture to guess that if you combine the pass rates for ANY type of qualification (either foot or foot/RRA) for first time test takers you'd be nearing the 50% mark.
     
  13. med2345

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    So this may be a bad question since I’m starting pod school in the summer but...

    Like some other specialties some are fully board certified and some are not but.. do you HAVE to pass the ABFAS to have full reconstructive rights to the foot or is it more to open doors to jobs and academic positions? Or is it also a safenet for malpractice ect for reconstruction?
     
  14. Redsting

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    For 500 people taking they make $1mill. According to what you wrote up I would say they are making at least $2mill a year with all the retakes per graduating class. I know people taking portions of it for the third time.
     
  15. Utvolsdpm

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    Where can you find that list of candidates?
     
  16. podgame1

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    Any theories as to why why does the fall exams have such a low pass rate compared to the spring exams?
     
  17. illinigrad11

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    Everyone (or probably at least close to everyone) taking the fall exams have already failed one or more exams in the spring. The X% of highest intelligence/best test takers/luckiest that passed all 4 in the spring are not included in the demographic taking the fall exams, thus the lower pass rates.
     
  18. Carbon13

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    I passed all 4 parts the first time but I'm too broke to afford the additional $600 or so for "Board Qualified" status registration, AACFAS. I'm not sure how many people like me are out there.
     
  19. dtrack22

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    I don't get this...
     
  20. apollofx

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    I second this, I can’t seem to find this information publicly. Anyone know?

    I was appalled at the poor imaging and cell phone pics. The “least likely”, “most likely” questions are rediculous and do not test surgical knowledge and can depend on course material. Podiatry continues to show how backwards the profession is, we need leadership interested in advancing the profession not in advancing their personal career and bank accounts.
     
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  21. podoloco

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  22. Pennsylvania Pod

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    That’s not accurate. Only 359 first time RRA CBPS exams were taken. Therefore the best possible pass rate for candidates that passed all 4 exams would be 185/359 = 51.5%. Still pathetic and a disgrace to our profession. They made $2million last year. There is no reason why they have to lower the pass rate to 51.5%. The leaders of our profession have failed us.
     
  23. jehjr

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    I think the scores are out...maybe. In my exam history the four board exams now say “passed”, whereas before I think they just said “taken”. Still no results in the score reports and I haven’t received any kind of notice, so I am not completely sure.
     
  24. josebiwasabi

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    Mine also says I passed all 4 parts.
     
  25. pacpod

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    Congrats to everyone who passed.
     
  26. footpainhealer

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    What are these exams for? Do all podiatrists have to take them? And is this the same thing as CPME or ABPM or ACFOAM? I've seen so many of these random abbreviations and still don't know which ones are legit/real lol.
     
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  27. Redsting

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    Fundraiser for sure. I know very few people who passed all 4 sections. Most I’ve talked to (and I’ve talked to a lot) passed 1-2 sections. Too bad the ABFAS wants to raise money instead of help the profession.
     
  28. ldsrmdude

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    I don’t think you get a score report unless you didn’t pass a section. Then you get a score report for that section. Otherwise, it’s just “passed.”
     
  29. jehjr

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    Understood. I was on mobile when I first checked and it seemed a little ambiguous. It’s pretty clear on the desktop version. I had thought they would at least send out an email or something.
     
  30. med2345

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    ABFAS is definitely the most respectable one I’ve seen. All the good surgical pods i know are members
     
  31. Madura

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    Correct. ABFAS is the only one that matters, although it is state-dependent. Assuming you know where you are going before you take boards, just ask your employer which board to take. The state I will be working in does not even recognize ABPM, so I saved myself the grand or so and only took ABFAS. This seems to be common in a lot of states. I even heard ABPM may be phased out completely so that only ABFAS is recognized as "the board," but no telling if or when that will actually happen.
     
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  32. footpainhealer

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    Why are there different boards? Shouldn't there just be one for podiatry? It's already an uber specific field as it is lol. From what I gathered, one does not need a board cert to actually practice right? It's just like a hoop to jump through so we can put "board certified" on our websites and business cards lol
     
  33. med2345

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    You don’t need to be ABFAS to do anything or be qualified to do procedures but it can help you land jobs, have a better rep, ect.. especially if you’re big on reconstruction and more complex surgical procedures
     
  34. ldsrmdude

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    All of the hospitals I am on staff at require board certification within a certain period of time for staff privileges so if you’re not board certified, you may not get privileges to do any surgeries or be able to see inpatients without board certification. It’s also widely accepted by other medical specialists that board certification is sought after and is the norm in most cases.

    I’ll also add that my job requires me to be board certified.
     
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  35. med2345

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    This was basically exactly my point but you said it better. In a hospital you may need board cert to do all the procedures (the job) you want to do/have. However if you're at a practice or a different hospital you may not need to be board certified. Many MD/DO physicians don't re-take their boards or never did and still have plentiful opportunities, but having it will give you more/better options. It is not an absolute necessity to practice to answer footpain's question. Could also be useful and help you in a legal situation.

    But yes basically this.
     
  36. Weirdy

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    How hard is attaining board certification?
    I've heard:
    - questions are a crap shoot with multiple "right" answers but some options are more "right" than the right answers
    - Are surgical case loads hard to come by within that time frame? Is this program dependent?
     
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  37. GypsyHummus

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    Are there opportunities for Pods to work who are not board certified?

     
  38. ldsrmdude

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    I think you'll find mixed answers on the first question. And I guess there's a bigger question: What should the purpose of board certification be? And should every podiatrist who finishes their residency be board-certified or should board certification be reserved for some elite group of podiatrists? There's different views on this.

    But that aside, I think that board certification is doable for most graduates. They don't really require a huge number of cases. The diversity of cases is what is challenging for a lot of people, I think. And I'm not sure what you mean by "program-dependent." Cases from residency don't count towards board-certification and only count in fellowship if you are the surgeon of record, I believe. It's certainly job-dependent in that some jobs aren't very surgical and it will take a while to get the cases required. Or some jobs are mostly forefoot and it will take a long time to get rearfoot/ankle certified. Since you have a hard limit of 7 years to become ABFAS certified, you definitely want to get it knocked out as soon as you can.
     
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  39. ldsrmdude

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    I'm sure there are. They will probably be in-office jobs mostly with limited surgical opportunity or at least there would be some limitations on where you could do surgery. I don't know that the surgery center I work at requires board certification so that could be a possibility for surgery. Working in a wound center may also not require board certification. I will also add that several of the contracts I have seen that require board certification don't require certification by ABFAS. My contract specifically states that there are multiple certifications that would satisfy the requirement.

    But you have to ask yourself, if you were a patient, would you want a doctor who was board-certified or one who wasn't? Or does it matter?
     
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  40. GypsyHummus

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    For most of the non surgical stuff, I don’t think it would matter. If I had a corn or callus, I’d be fine to go to a Pod who doesn’t have board certification.

    Anything more than an ingrown toenail, I’d want board certification, especially for surgery.

     
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  41. footpainhealer

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    Is there supposed to be a bunch of different boards? Or is that a podiatry specific thing because governing bodies can't figure their crap out? I always just saw couple boards for other fields but it seems like pod has 4-5 that I can think of off the top of my head. That's not normal for other fields right?
     
  42. ldsrmdude

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    I can't really speak for other specialties, but I think it makes some sense to have 2 boards for us since we aren't a strictly surgical profession. Having a surgical board and a medical board makes sense. And ABFAS and ABPM fill those roles fine I think. There is a feeling among a lot of podiatrists that I know that the other boards we have, and yes there are several other ones, were mostly started by and for people who couldn't achieve ABFAS (or ABPS at that time) certification but still wanted to call themselves "board-certified." As you can see from this thread, it's not really like everyone is just in love with the ABFAS, so there are probably some that just don't want to support it and want to support another board. In any case, ABFAS and ABPM are still the most well-respected and widely recognized.
     
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  43. STLFeetdoc

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    I too agree with you. I have finally passed my part 1 and 2 exam and the CBPS but have been unfairly failed 3 times on the case reviews. I am trying to gather some other doctors to help me expose the unfair and biased process of the ABFAS. Let me know if you want to help?
     
  44. STLFeetdoc

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    The big problem is that ABFAS and ABPM have monopolized the system Illegally. I can show you a lawsuit against them from another surgical boards in 1999 and 2003 that supports this. I have been failed 3 times for case review and I feel I have found signifcant problems in there evaluation methods, but yet I cannot appeal. Their pass rates are extremely low in comparison to our ortho collegues. It just doesn’t make sense. I lost out on a great teaching position because I wasn’t certified by them. Im certified by another surgical boards but becuase the CPME and the AbFAS are “buddies”, those other boards have no chance to succeed.
     
  45. STLFeetdoc

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    I lost out on my dream job as a teacher becuase I wasn’t certified by ABFAS. Im certified by a different surgical boards. Sad that ABFAS and CPME have monopolized the system. It tough for a little guy to even have a chance.
     
  46. STLFeetdoc

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    I wouldnt say well respected. They just have been around the longest and have connections with CPME. They also have a history of sending misleading statements to hospitals and insurance companies against other smaller boards that has helped them monoplize the system. Sad but true.
     

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