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Stroganoff

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...and connecting them to a college network. I ran across this page:

Unauthorized Wireless Access Points

You want to set up your own Wireless Access Point? That's great, however don't do it without contacting [email protected] to get permission and the appropriate settings first. Unauthorized access points have brought down wireless networking on our campus several times in the past.

DNS, DHCP, WINS and Proxy Servers

Basically setting up a private network and connecting it to our network is a bad idea. If you set up your own network that's fine... just keep it self-contained and don't connect it to a faceplate. If you want to use a router, switch, bridge or other advanced piece of networking hardware, check with Technical Infrastructure Services first.
Can anyone explain the reasoning? I'm thinking about getting a wireless router so I can connect my desktop, laptop, and PDA to the university network (under one IP using the DHCP server on the router). What could possibly go wrong? I've done all this before, except it was connected to a DSL modem.
 

flighterdoc

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Dallenoff said:
...and connecting them to a college network. I ran across this page:



Can anyone explain the reasoning? I'm thinking about getting a wireless router so I can connect my desktop, laptop, and PDA to the university network (under one IP using the DHCP server on the router). What could possibly go wrong? I've done all this before, except it was connected to a DSL modem.

Depends on how well the campus network is built in the first place, but an ad-hoc WAP can duplicate existing IP address schema and screw things up. "Bring down an entire network" might be a bit much, but.....

However, the onus is on the IT department of the school, not the rank and file idiots. If their network is so fragile, TS.
 

javert

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My college also forbids setting up wireless networks. Their reasoning is that most people don't know how to properly secure them so it can leave a hole open in the network and compromise security. I think it has more to do with how they have the network set up (as flighterdoc said); last year I used to have a wireless network set up in my suite for the exact purpose you describe, and the university authorization system didn't seem to work over wireless. This was back when they allowed wireless networks; now they've fixed the authorization bug but forbid wireless :confused:

However, my college actually encourages students to set up routers in their rooms (for the additional firewall protection).
 

DrIsh

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This is mainly a security issue.

There can be 4,000,000 users behind the router you are setting up, each "off limits" to the campus IT since you are setting up a PRIVATE network on THEIR network. This opens up doors to so many possible things that may, and usually do, go wrong.

Maintaining a network, part of which you do not have control over, is a *****. Also, setting up a DHCP server (which basically assigns IPs dynamically) can make tracking down virulent users an incredibly difficult task. Finding a rogue DHCP router, however, is quite easy and if they do find out, they will ban the MAC address permanently.

Hope that helps,
Ish
 
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Stroganoff

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Well, this is a technology-backwards school, and there's no wireless signal anywhere on campus, and definitely not in these on-campus apartments. I actually got that policy from my old school because my current school's policy is vague.

Nevermind, here it is:
I. Wireless network equipment operating anywhere on **** *****’s campus must:

1) Be compliant with 802.11 “b” or “g” standards (and others as they are developed and evaluated.)

2) Operate on designated frequency channels. For these systems, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approved 11 channels defined in the 802.11b standard. However, 802.11b signals overlap with adjacent channel frequencies. As a result, channel separation is required to limit interference between adjacent access points. The channels selected for use at **** ****** ***** University are:
a. Frequency Channel 1, to be used for Student installations.
b. Frequency Channel 6, to be used for Faculty/Staff installations.
c. Frequency Channel 11, to be used for Information Services installations.

3) Serve only pre-authorized users; i.e. for security purposes, each wireless access point must be programmed/set to authorize a defined set of users only.

4) Operate in a data encryption mode.

5) Operate with DHCP services disabled on the network-attached devices.
.......
I do plan on using MAC address filtering only allowing 3 devices, 128-bit WEP encryption (not perfect, but still), and turning off SSID broadcast if possible. If I disable DHCP, can I still connect 3 devices to it? Like would I have to manually pre-assign my desktop, laptop, PDA a permanent local IP?

Seems easy enough...
 

Sessamoid

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Dallenoff said:
Like would I have to manually pre-assign my desktop, laptop, PDA a permanent local IP?

Seems easy enough...
You can connect as many devices as you like, but as you noted you will have to manually assign those local IP addresses. That's the job that DHCP is designed to make easier, but it's also less secure.
 
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