1. The SDN iPhone App is back and free through November! Get it today and please post a review on the App Store!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice

Academic practice VS Private Practice

Discussion in 'Pain Medicine' started by Spine Specialist, Aug 2, 2006.

  1. Spine Specialist

    Spine Specialist Passion for Spine
    Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2003
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    14
    Let us discuss. I am aware of the main difference : $$$ and $. Some people love academic pain practice. Some like to establish their own shop. How many people start private practice right out of training? How boring it is to wait for your referrals sitting alone in your newly established office? How many people drop their own business after a while and start working for somebody? Share your experiences.
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Mister Mxyzptlk

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Messages:
    4,683
    Likes Received:
    831
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I spent my first 8 years in academics, and the past 15 in private practice. The money issue is the obvious one. In academics people still chase money, usually by getting lucrative relationships with drug companies (hardware companies generally aren't quite as rich and have less $ to spend on research infomercials).

    One of the non-monetary aspects to consider is that you have no control over your professional life. Your vacation and call schedules will be determined by someone else, similar to the process you went through as a resident. And as with residency you will have dozens of "siblings", all sucking up to the parent figure (chairman) from whom all things flow. That is who determines whether you have your own office or share, whether you have lab days and how many, your salary, etc.

    The upside is that you don't have to deal with billing, collections, rent, hiring and firing, etc. That is a big plus.

    One other thing to consider is whether or not you have a "long arm". Can you stand there to the side and watch someone struggle through a procedure? Or are you a perfectionist who has to do it with the best possible effort every time? Will you be able to tolerate the fact that there will be a lot more wet taps, paresthesias, etc than if you did it yourself?

    Teaching can be very rewarding and it keeps you sharp because you are always having to explain your thinking to someone else, but don't expect to get either rich or famous just by teaching.
     
  4. Spine Specialist

    Spine Specialist Passion for Spine
    Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2003
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    14
    Academic practice is not very attractive for obvious reasons. How good is the private practice scenario for newbies in 2006? Dont compare the situation with veterans like you and algos like senior specialists. That was 15 years ago. How good are the multi-speciality groups who are hiring the new spine and pain specialists? Why some groups are not trustworthy? How to identify a reliable group which would benefit and also help a hardworking/work ethical/talented/motivated/ambitious new guy? Is it a norm to fire a newbie before him/her becoming a partner of the group?
     

Share This Page