Firewood

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You could also probably call this thread "Analysis Paralysis".

I'm a US grad applying to psychiatry this year. As the ROL deadline approaches, I seem to be getting more confused about just how I'm going to rank various programs. Right now, I'm struggling between how to rank three programs.

Program A is what I'd call the strongest academically, i.e. it's a large program with lots of funding, lots of research, lots of excellent clinical opportunities, and lots of faculty. It also has some unique opportunities in regards to a patient population I'm interested in working with. Program B is a smaller program and seems to really excel at teaching; while there are less clinical opportunities, it seems like almost every aspect of the program has been designed with resident education in mind. Finally, program C is a solid program in between A and B in regard to size. It isn't as strong in teaching or academics, but has taken the lead because of multiple family reasons.

I don't plan on going into academics, but other than that I'm still unsure as to how I want to practice after residency. So, all things being equal, just how important are academics and teaching in regards to my training? Will I be a better trained psychiatrist if I go to program A or B, or do things like motivation and drive play a more important role? In other words, am I just over analyzing this and should I just go to the program where my family would be happiest (Program C: Happy wife = happy life)?
 
Jan 31, 2013
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You could also probably call this thread "Analysis Paralysis".

I'm a US grad applying to psychiatry this year. As the ROL deadline approaches, I seem to be getting more confused about just how I'm going to rank various programs. Right now, I'm struggling between how to rank three programs.

Program A is what I'd call the strongest academically, i.e. it's a large program with lots of funding, lots of research, lots of excellent clinical opportunities, and lots of faculty. It also has some unique opportunities in regards to a patient population I'm interested in working with. Program B is a smaller program and seems to really excel at teaching; while there are less clinical opportunities, it seems like almost every aspect of the program has been designed with resident education in mind. Finally, program C is a solid program in between A and B in regard to size. It isn't as strong in teaching or academics, but has taken the lead because of multiple family reasons.

I don't plan on going into academics, but other than that I'm still unsure as to how I want to practice after residency. So, all things being equal, just how important are academics and teaching in regards to my training? Will I be a better trained psychiatrist if I go to program A or B, or do things like motivation and drive play a more important role? In other words, am I just over analyzing this and should I just go to the program where my family would be happiest (Program C: Happy wife = happy life)?
You sound more excited about program A and the interesting patient population. Are you generally good at teaching yourself? Would you be happier in the location of program C? It you are not in a location you enjoy then I would say that is a big factor.
 
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Firewood

Firewood

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If family wasn't involved, I'd probably rank things B, then A, then C. And as for teaching myself, that shouldn't be an issue as long as I could get mentorship and faculty support, neither of which is a problem at program C, which is still a good program. As for location, I'd be happy in any of the cities. One of the problems is that I like all three of these programs, which on the one hand is good as I'll be happy at any of them. On the other hand, it makes ranking a little more difficult.
 

notdeadyet

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Give some thought to how you learn. Some folks learn best by guided instruction. Others learn best by actually doing. If you think of how you best learn and how you most enjoy learning, this can help you make a better educated guess as to which environment you'll find more fulfilling.
 
Jan 31, 2013
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If family wasn't involved, I'd probably rank things B, then A, then C. And as for teaching myself, that shouldn't be an issue as long as I could get mentorship and faculty support, neither of which is a problem at program C, which is still a good program. As for location, I'd be happy in any of the cities. One of the problems is that I like all three of these programs, which on the one hand is good as I'll be happy at any of them. On the other hand, it makes ranking a little more difficult.
That is what you should do then B, A, C. Residency is not the rest of your life just 4yrs and you can move where you want after.
 
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Firewood

Firewood

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Give some thought to how you learn. Some folks learn best by guided instruction. Others learn best by actually doing. If you think of how you best learn and how you most enjoy learning, this can help you make a better educated guess as to which environment you'll find more fulfilling.
Great suggestion. I think this helps clarify things for me.
 
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Firewood

Firewood

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That is what you should do then B, A, C. Residency is not the rest of your life just 4yrs and you can move where you want after.
Very true, and I would do so if it was just me. However, I'm married with children, so my opinions are just part of the equation.

I'm pretty confident on ranking program C at the top of the list. However, I'm still curious about just how important academics and teaching are in regards to resident education. Any opinions on this?
 

vistaril

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Jun 10, 2012
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You could also probably call this thread "Analysis Paralysis".

I'm a US grad applying to psychiatry this year. As the ROL deadline approaches, I seem to be getting more confused about just how I'm going to rank various programs. Right now, I'm struggling between how to rank three programs.

Program A is what I'd call the strongest academically, i.e. it's a large program with lots of funding, lots of research, lots of excellent clinical opportunities, and lots of faculty. It also has some unique opportunities in regards to a patient population I'm interested in working with. Program B is a smaller program and seems to really excel at teaching; while there are less clinical opportunities, it seems like almost every aspect of the program has been designed with resident education in mind. Finally, program C is a solid program in between A and B in regard to size. It isn't as strong in teaching or academics, but has taken the lead because of multiple family reasons.

I don't plan on going into academics, but other than that I'm still unsure as to how I want to practice after residency. So, all things being equal, just how important are academics and teaching in regards to my training? Will I be a better trained psychiatrist if I go to program A or B, or do things like motivation and drive play a more important role? In other words, am I just over analyzing this and should I just go to the program where my family would be happiest (Program C: Happy wife = happy life)?
C, and it isn't even close.

You don't even really know for sure that the training at A or B will be better....you're just guessing.

Now if A and B are Columbia and MGH and C is Marmonaides, then yeah, I can see the debate even if C is where you would prefer for other reasons.

But otherwise, C by a mile.
 
Jan 31, 2013
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Very true, and I would do so if it was just me. However, I'm married with children, so my opinions are just part of the equation.

I'm pretty confident on ranking program C at the top of the list. However, I'm still curious about just how important academics and teaching are in regards to resident education. Any opinions on this?
I am also married with children but will be picking the best program for my training for my family's future.

I would think programs would want both areas to be an asset at their programs. I have found that some are better at teaching than others when I visit. My first choice program is well rounded.
 

psychked

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I thought maimonides was a decent program. as far as I saw given its unique characteristics