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3lefts

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Does anyone happen to know of residency programs that are particularly supportive (financially or logistically) of adoption?


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I would probably just look for programs that are more family friendly in general. As far as I know the residency program I went to didn't have any sort of official policy on adoption but since the culture there very much encouraged residents to have children I would expect them to do what they could to accommodate an adoption plan.
 
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Does anyone happen to know of residency programs that are particularly supportive (financially or logistically) of adoption?
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I would just bear in mind timing with that. I personally think it's great you want to adopt, but I would be very concerned if my co-resident would have to leave with little notice for adoption related things. The unfortunate reality of medicine is that any slack you make, someone else will have to pick up. If you can do it during an outpatient year the process would probably go smoothly at most residencies.
 
I would just bear in mind timing with that. I personally think it's great you want to adopt, but I would be very concerned if my co-resident would have to leave with little notice for adoption related things. The unfortunate reality of medicine is that any slack you make, someone else will have to pick up. If you can do it during an outpatient year the process would probably go smoothly at most residencies.
would you feel the same way about a colleague who was pregnant? it's no different and this attitude while understandable is prejudiced
 
would you feel the same way about a colleague who was pregnant? it's no different and this attitude while understandable is prejudiced

It depends on the type of adoption I guess. Have been previously involved in this area pre-psychiatry, there can be lots of last minute things that require leaving on short notice. It's not at all about prejudice and it is true pregnancy can of course have acute demands if things go poorly but every woman I have known in residency that was pregnant worked up until near 40 weeks and only left for pre-scheduled apts they arranged around their clinical duties.
 
It's always nice to give as much notice as possible of personal events that might affect the call schedule, but I also don't think people need to apologize or feel guilty for having a kid during an inconvenient time in residency. Our lives don't stop in residency (or as an attending). In my residency and early attendinghood, there have been plenty of situations where one of us docs had a baby, had to take leave to be with a dying family member, or wound up sick/injured ourselves. It's not always fun when you have to cover for someone's personal situation, sure, but doctors are human and not machines. Hopefully if you're in a decent program there is an understanding that if you cover for someone they'll pay you back by covering for you later too.
 
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Thanks for your thoughts everyone. I had heard that the timing can be very much out of the prospective parents' hands, and I can see why this could be hard on other residents. In interviews, is it okay to ask how clinical responsibilities are covered when a resident in the program takes leave or would that be risky as a candidate? Any specific markers to look for to find a family friendly program beyond the residents themselves having families?


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Thanks for your thoughts everyone. I had heard that the timing can be very much out of the prospective parents' hands, and I can see why this could be hard on other residents. In interviews, is it okay to ask how clinical responsibilities are covered when a resident in the program takes leave or would that be risky as a candidate? Any specific markers to look for to find a family friendly program beyond the residents themselves having families?
This is the kind of question I would ask at the dinner or lunch with residents etc. The faculty probably don't even know the answer to this. In terms of whether it's risky, that would depend on whether you were a marginal candidate. If not, then you probably don't want to be at a program that would ding you for asking a perfectly reasonable question. I can't see how if asked in an appropriate manner that it would reflect badly, it's a very sensible question to ask! You can start off by asking more general questions like:
"can you give me any examples of how this program has been supportive of residents?"
"is it common for residents to have children during residency? how is this managed?" and then go from there..
 
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thank you for adoption. please consider Korea children... they so cute!
 
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