Narmerguy

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I was looking at programs for residency training:

http://med.stanford.edu/arts/overview.html

Like that website. Apparently it's designed for MD graduates who want to get a PhD in clinical research or something like that? I know Yale and UCLA have similar programs as well:

http://www.info.med.yale.edu/invmed/

http://www.star.med.ucla.edu/

What's the merit of programs like these and why would someone do these over an MDPhD? Is this basically separate from your residency training (as in, it would still take 3-4 years longer to become an attending)? Also, how do these programs differ from Physician Scientist Residency Programs?

Thanks.
 

Doctor&Geek

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WashU has one (CSTAR)
Pitt has one (CSTP)

Good for folks who want to do patient-oriented research. Not for laboratory investigators, debatable worth for translational investigators.

Also note some MSTPs offer PhDs in public health fields, including epidemiology, which are essentially the same as these, but get their school paid.
 
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Narmerguy

Narmerguy

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Why do you say someone offering an MDPhD in a public health field is the same as something like this? It was my understanding that these are offered in many different residency options like Radonc (the one I'm interested in).

Any other input?
 

Doctor&Geek

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Why do you say someone offering an MDPhD in a public health field is the same as something like this? It was my understanding that these are offered in many different residency options like Radonc (the one I'm interested in).

Any other input?
Check those websites - Stanford is the only one listed that offers RadOnc folks a PhD option. I haven't heard of anybody getting a PhD while in RadOnc residency (ask in the RadOnc forum), simply no time. You're better off doing a post-doc with one of the NIH loan forgiveness programs or something similar.
 
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Narmerguy

Narmerguy

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Check those websites - Stanford is the only one listed that offers RadOnc folks a PhD option. I haven't heard of anybody getting a PhD while in RadOnc residency (ask in the RadOnc forum), simply no time. You're better off doing a post-doc with one of the NIH loan forgiveness programs or something similar.
I wasn't aware such things existed. What does it entail?