Advice/recommendations for surviving medical school.

G

grapefruit17

Who I am: Intern resident physician at a university residency program. Graduate of osteopathic medical school. Survivor of OMM.

why I'm posting this: I read this forums every now and then and seems like theres a lot of threads lately w/ people struggling. So here are lessons I learned. Take it with a grain of salt, may or may not work with you.

1. Class vs no class. Figure this out early on, the earlier the better. Do you absolutely need to go to class? Because if you don't, the amount of time you save by not going is a nice advantage. Benefits of not going include...
-Ability to watch lectures at your own speed. Your teacher tells an annoying 5 min story? Fast forward. The lecture steers of topic into something completely random? Fast forward. The class is taking a 5-10 min break but you want to keep going? Np. Go to the part where the break is over. While in school I would often do a "2 hour block lecture" in 45 mins (maybe an hour), maybe a little more, maybe a little less. So instead of 2 hours spent listening to one lecture, where I prob only heard 20% of it, I would instead finish in around 45 mins or so and hear 80-90 percent of it. Your mind wanders too much while sitting down, in a large group of people, where someone isn't directly talking to you. unless you have intense concentration, going to class is usually not the best way to send your time. To add to all this, 8 hours of lecture could be dwindled down to 4-6 hours depending on how many times I would need to pause or stop. Oh, and thats another high yield thing about not going to class. The ability to pause. So many times in class we would go over a concept that I had no idea what they were talking about and the lecture would just keep going. I realized I wasted time by this happening. Watching a lecture and don't understand a concept? Pause it, go back to it, think about it and google it.
-better personal life. You don't study well when you're depressed or stressed for time. Just doesn't happen. You need to be rested and at least somewhat happy to maximize your studying. if you aren't taking. little time out of each day for yourself, something is very wrong with your routine, imo. remember, you aren't a robot. You aren't designed to sit in a dark library 24/7 and be expected to still retain masses of information. Your mind/body needs a break every now and then.
-Review ability. This is hy. My routine was this...Mornings: Review all the old lectures. Lectures I haven't reviewed much took longer, lectures I felt good on I did a quick glance/review to keep the material fresh in my head. Afternoons: watching the new lectures. Watch them, take notes, put them in your review pile for tomm morning.
-Sleep. Not getting at least 6-8 hours of sleep each night is a sure way to fall into depressive type feelings, eventually. You need sleep to retain material.

2. Study groups. Even the closest study group at my school eventually fell apart. In most, but not all cases, they're too inefficient. Why? Because everyone has their own pace. Everyone has their own strengths and weakness. If you're reviewing crap that you're 100% good on, because someone else is weak on it, that is eating away at your time. Plus, when you study with your friends its just way too easy to veer off.
-A good alternative to this...I had a few close friends in my class. We shared notes and kept each other motivated. We had group messaging chats and would just answer any questions we would between our group. Fast, and efficient way of group studying vs meeting up and trying to over things together. My advice- choose friends that are smarter and more motivated than you are. They often will indirectly make you a better person.

3. Keep number of resources small. Focus on class notes more than anything. There isn't enough time in the day to read books, memorize pps, watch lectures, etc. Keep resource number small, figure out where test questions come from and focus on that. Survive your classes before you worry about boards, otherwise you won't get to boards anyways.

4. Don't waste too much time making guides/anki cards. First year I would make study guides for myself where it was a 1 page per 1 hour of lecture fast summary that allowed for quick review. Was super helpful for me. I only dropped it second year because by then I didn't care about grades too much. Second year I would download the powerpoint for class, and immediately delete every PP slide that I felt had no chance of being tested. I would routinely turn a 40 slide PP into 20 or less. Became much faster to review. I wouldn't recommend spending several hours making guides or your own notes tho. Often its a lot of time for limited return and time is your greatest resource in medical school.

5. Don't eat like crap too much. you'll feel like crap. try to exercise every now and then, it gives a feeling of euphoria that coffee gives, but drinking too much caffeine can lead to crashing, exacerbating depression/fatigue.

6. Ignore people who talk about their scores. They're prob lying. The loudest people were usually the ones who did the worst while the quiet ones were the sharpest.

7. Board study. Board study is a culmination of your two years at medical school. If your school is anything like mine, you prob didn't learn too much HY stuff. But thats ok. You should have picked up at least a small foundation of knowledge along the way. You can build off that. I started really studying 6 months out from boards. I won't get too much into that since how people board study for step 1 hasn't changed much since I've been a student and everyone has their own slight variation. But essentially time*effort=success. Thats my formula that I always used. If you spend 12 hours studying with zero effort, you will have 0 success. Both need to be maximized to do well. Studying is not looking at Facebook every 5 mins. Once I was 6mo out, every morning would be nothing but board study. Every afternoon would be class, with the intent to finish class stuff as soon as possible. Your friends, loved ones, family will have to realize this is your time.
-Take the comlex PE seriously. I did an insane amount of studying for it. Too much. Why? Because I'm not lazy and the idea of flying to Philly again to pay >1000 and do OMM did not sound like a good day. What I did was the Kauffman stuff, in addition it thought of all the common stuff you see in FM, as well as screening cases, and wrote down guides of what questions I would ask/what PE id perform as well as A/Ps.
-Step 2 learn from your rotations and do questions nonstop. Most of the book sources sucked for step 2. Onlinemeded is gold. Helps for step 2 and you'll look like a baller on clinical rotations.

8. For clinical years, its totally ok to sound stupid. I work with med students and sometimes they sound stupid. I don't call them out for this because I was there. I care more about if you are in a positive mood/friendly than how much you know. A positive student can be taught to learn more than a negative student who thinks he knows everything. Most attending won't judge you for sounding dumb, or doing dumb things. The person who will judge you the most, is you. So ease up on yourself. Sometimes you'll feel tired, or maybe a little depressed. At that point its best to take some time out for yourself after youre done with your shift and pursue a hobby. If you feel overwhelmed, talk to a resident that is easy going. Most will understand and could offer further advice. Chances are, they feel the same, lol. Once on my unit I had one patient having sx of stroke while simultaneously another pt having sx of a MI while my attending was at another clinic. So yea. it happens.

9. When applying to residency, have zero regrets. you can always make the money back. I recommend over applying because why not? you don't get dinged for applying to 100 residencies and you can always cancel interviews. You can't cancel interviews you don't have. Unless you're a rockstar applicant for your field, look at the average amount of places to apply to, and apply to more then that. Not even joking. My program gets an insane number of applicants, and during residency season you're just a piece of a paper before you get an interview.

10. Find someone you can confide in. Helps if they know what you're going through. Sometimes having someone to blow off steam to/complain to can make you feel a bit better. Just do all of it at home, and don't bring any to work/school

ok, that was just some random stuff I thought of. Feel free to ask questions if you think I may have an answer. I may or may not have one. Dunno. Goodluck DOs.
 

trs88

5+ Year Member
Mar 20, 2013
716
658
TN or Texas
Status
Medical Student
For step 2, you mentioned do questions nonstop. Are there any question banks that you preferred?
 

IslandStyle808

Akuma residency or bust!
7+ Year Member
Aug 5, 2012
5,574
4,250
Solid post thanks for sharing.

I feel the same way for the vast majority of your points. However, I am the exceptions when it comes for 2 and 4. For 2, I had my study group from almost the beginning of 1st year till 2nd year now. It is just what you have said about the other groups, they broke up due to various reasons. However, we had no real standards for our group, we just plow through the powerpoints real quickly and give our input. And that is probably why we lasted so long. It works ridiculously well in fact, the loss in time for one subject you know is more than made up for the ones you don't. As for 4, I've noticed this as a problem as well. However, I don't make a ton of cards, but by making my questions higher order, I find out quickly what are the random useless sides. So it has been helpful so far having Anki, and funny part is that I hate flash cards...

Everything else from 1-6 I totally agree, and I will keep 7-10 in mind as well.
 
About the Ads
OP
G

grapefruit17

For step 2, you mentioned do questions nonstop. Are there any question banks that you preferred?
I did comquest, combank, uworld. Did all of them 2-3 times each. not joking. Also did pretest books during rotaitons and comats from comeback before each shelf when I had time. Of the Banks for step 2 Uworld>combank>conquest. IMO. I scored in the mid 600s doing mainly questions. Maxed out most sections, but did "average" (middle bar) on EM and surgery. I made some of the world explanations and algorithms into anki card. I also anki all of MTB step 2 at one point but this was honestly a low yield idea and didn't do much for me. Keep in mind, the question banks were used over a year period.
 
  • Like
Reactions: trs88
OP
G

grapefruit17

Solid post thanks for sharing.

I feel the same way for the vast majority of your points. However, I am the exceptions when it comes for 2 and 4. For 2, I had my study group from almost the beginning of 1st year till 2nd year now. It is just what you have said about the other groups, they broke up due to various reasons. However, we had no real standards for our group, we just plow through the powerpoints real quickly and give our input. And that is probably why we lasted so long. It works ridiculously well in fact, the loss in time for one subject you know is more than made up for the ones you don't. As for 4, I've noticed this as a problem as well. However, I don't make a ton of cards, but by making my questions higher order, I find out quickly what are the random useless sides. So it has been helpful so far having Anki, and funny part is that I hate flash cards...

Everything else from 1-6 I totally agree, and I will keep 7-10 in mind as well.
for sure. it sounds like you have a group of dedicated people who are focused/motivate you. Those people are hard to come by often. my group was more of a behind the scenes ordeal, but your way can def work with the right people
 
  • Like
Reactions: IslandStyle808

Goro

Gold Donor
7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
55,279
82,555
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
Moderators, please sticky!!!!!

Who I am: Intern resident physician at a university residency program. Graduate of osteopathic medical school. Survivor of OMM.

why I'm posting this: I read this forums every now and then and seems like theres a lot of threads lately w/ people struggling. So here are lessons I learned. Take it with a grain of salt, may or may not work with you.

1. Class vs no class. Figure this out early on, the earlier the better. Do you absolutely need to go to class? Because if you don't, the amount of time you save by not going is a nice advantage. Benefits of not going include...
-Ability to watch lectures at your own speed. Your teacher tells an annoying 5 min story? Fast forward. The lecture steers of topic into something completely random? Fast forward. The class is taking a 5-10 min break but you want to keep going? Np. Go to the part where the break is over. While in school I would often do a "2 hour block lecture" in 45 mins (maybe an hour), maybe a little more, maybe a little less. So instead of 2 hours spent listening to one lecture, where I prob only heard 20% of it, I would instead finish in around 45 mins or so and hear 80-90 percent of it. Your mind wanders too much while sitting down, in a large group of people, where someone isn't directly talking to you. unless you have intense concentration, going to class is usually not the best way to send your time. To add to all this, 8 hours of lecture could be dwindled down to 4-6 hours depending on how many times I would need to pause or stop. Oh, and thats another high yield thing about not going to class. The ability to pause. So many times in class we would go over a concept that I had no idea what they were talking about and the lecture would just keep going. I realized I wasted time by this happening. Watching a lecture and don't understand a concept? Pause it, go back to it, think about it and google it.
-better personal life. You don't study well when you're depressed or stressed for time. Just doesn't happen. You need to be rested and at least somewhat happy to maximize your studying. if you aren't taking. little time out of each day for yourself, something is very wrong with your routine, imo. remember, you aren't a robot. You aren't designed to sit in a dark library 24/7 and be expected to still retain masses of information. Your mind/body needs a break every now and then.
-Review ability. This is hy. My routine was this...Mornings: Review all the old lectures. Lectures I haven't reviewed much took longer, lectures I felt good on I did a quick glance/review to keep the material fresh in my head. Afternoons: watching the new lectures. Watch them, take notes, put them in your review pile for tomm morning.
-Sleep. Not getting at least 6-8 hours of sleep each night is a sure way to fall into depressive type feelings, eventually. You need sleep to retain material.

2. Study groups. Even the closest study group at my school eventually fell apart. In most, but not all cases, they're too inefficient. Why? Because everyone has their own pace. Everyone has their own strengths and weakness. If you're reviewing crap that you're 100% good on, because someone else is weak on it, that is eating away at your time. Plus, when you study with your friends its just way too easy to veer off.
-A good alternative to this...I had a few close friends in my class. We shared notes and kept each other motivated. We had group messaging chats and would just answer any questions we would between our group. Fast, and efficient way of group studying vs meeting up and trying to over things together. My advice- choose friends that are smarter and more motivated than you are. They often will indirectly make you a better person.

3. Keep number of resources small. Focus on class notes more than anything. There isn't enough time in the day to read books, memorize pps, watch lectures, etc. Keep resource number small, figure out where test questions come from and focus on that. Survive your classes before you worry about boards, otherwise you won't get to boards anyways.

4. Don't waste too much time making guides/anki cards. First year I would make study guides for myself where it was a 1 page per 1 hour of lecture fast summary that allowed for quick review. Was super helpful for me. I only dropped it second year because by then I didn't care about grades too much. Second year I would download the powerpoint for class, and immediately delete every PP slide that I felt had no chance of being tested. I would routinely turn a 40 slide PP into 20 or less. Became much faster to review. I wouldn't recommend spending several hours making guides or your own notes tho. Often its a lot of time for limited return and time is your greatest resource in medical school.

5. Don't eat like crap too much. you'll feel like crap. try to exercise every now and then, it gives a feeling of euphoria that coffee gives, but drinking too much caffeine can lead to crashing, exacerbating depression/fatigue.

6. Ignore people who talk about their scores. They're prob lying. The loudest people were usually the ones who did the worst while the quiet ones were the sharpest.

7. Board study. Board study is a culmination of your two years at medical school. If your school is anything like mine, you prob didn't learn too much HY stuff. But thats ok. You should have picked up at least a small foundation of knowledge along the way. You can build off that. I started really studying 6 months out from boards. I won't get too much into that since how people board study for step 1 hasn't changed much since I've been a student and everyone has their own slight variation. But essentially time*effort=success. Thats my formula that I always used. If you spend 12 hours studying with zero effort, you will have 0 success. Both need to be maximized to do well. Studying is not looking at Facebook every 5 mins. Once I was 6mo out, every morning would be nothing but board study. Every afternoon would be class, with the intent to finish class stuff as soon as possible. Your friends, loved ones, family will have to realize this is your time.
-Take the comlex PE seriously. I did an insane amount of studying for it. Too much. Why? Because I'm not lazy and the idea of flying to Philly again to pay >1000 and do OMM did not sound like a good day. What I did was the Kauffman stuff, in addition it thought of all the common stuff you see in FM, as well as screening cases, and wrote down guides of what questions I would ask/what PE id perform as well as A/Ps.
-Step 2 learn from your rotations and do questions nonstop. Most of the book sources sucked for step 2. Onlinemeded is gold. Helps for step 2 and you'll look like a baller on clinical rotations.

8. For clinical years, its totally ok to sound stupid. I work with med students and sometimes they sound stupid. I don't call them out for this because I was there. I care more about if you are in a positive mood/friendly than how much you know. A positive student can be taught to learn more than a negative student who thinks he knows everything. Most attending won't judge you for sounding dumb, or doing dumb things. The person who will judge you the most, is you. So ease up on yourself. Sometimes you'll feel tired, or maybe a little depressed. At that point its best to take some time out for yourself after youre done with your shift and pursue a hobby. If you feel overwhelmed, talk to a resident that is easy going. Most will understand and could offer further advice. Chances are, they feel the same, lol. Once on my unit I had one patient having sx of stroke while simultaneously another pt having sx of a MI while my attending was at another clinic. So yea. it happens.

9. When applying to residency, have zero regrets. you can always make the money back. I recommend over applying because why not? you don't get dinged for applying to 100 residencies and you can always cancel interviews. You can't cancel interviews you don't have. Unless you're a rockstar applicant for your field, look at the average amount of places to apply to, and apply to more then that. Not even joking. My program gets an insane number of applicants, and during residency season you're just a piece of a paper before you get an interview.

10. Find someone you can confide in. Helps if they know what you're going through. Sometimes having someone to blow off steam to/complain to can make you feel a bit better. Just do all of it at home, and don't bring any to work/school

ok, that was just some random stuff I thought of. Feel free to ask questions if you think I may have an answer. I may or may not have one. Dunno. Goodluck DOs.
 

12glaucoma34

Membership Revoked
Removed
Account on Hold
Aug 1, 2017
255
218
Status
Medical Student
Who I am: Intern resident physician at a university residency program. Graduate of osteopathic medical school. Survivor of OMM.

why I'm posting this: I read this forums every now and then and seems like theres a lot of threads lately w/ people struggling. So here are lessons I learned. Take it with a grain of salt, may or may not work with you.

1. Class vs no class. Figure this out early on, the earlier the better. Do you absolutely need to go to class? Because if you don't, the amount of time you save by not going is a nice advantage. Benefits of not going include...
-Ability to watch lectures at your own speed. Your teacher tells an annoying 5 min story? Fast forward. The lecture steers of topic into something completely random? Fast forward. The class is taking a 5-10 min break but you want to keep going? Np. Go to the part where the break is over. While in school I would often do a "2 hour block lecture" in 45 mins (maybe an hour), maybe a little more, maybe a little less. So instead of 2 hours spent listening to one lecture, where I prob only heard 20% of it, I would instead finish in around 45 mins or so and hear 80-90 percent of it. Your mind wanders too much while sitting down, in a large group of people, where someone isn't directly talking to you. unless you have intense concentration, going to class is usually not the best way to send your time. To add to all this, 8 hours of lecture could be dwindled down to 4-6 hours depending on how many times I would need to pause or stop. Oh, and thats another high yield thing about not going to class. The ability to pause. So many times in class we would go over a concept that I had no idea what they were talking about and the lecture would just keep going. I realized I wasted time by this happening. Watching a lecture and don't understand a concept? Pause it, go back to it, think about it and google it.
-better personal life. You don't study well when you're depressed or stressed for time. Just doesn't happen. You need to be rested and at least somewhat happy to maximize your studying. if you aren't taking. little time out of each day for yourself, something is very wrong with your routine, imo. remember, you aren't a robot. You aren't designed to sit in a dark library 24/7 and be expected to still retain masses of information. Your mind/body needs a break every now and then.
-Review ability. This is hy. My routine was this...Mornings: Review all the old lectures. Lectures I haven't reviewed much took longer, lectures I felt good on I did a quick glance/review to keep the material fresh in my head. Afternoons: watching the new lectures. Watch them, take notes, put them in your review pile for tomm morning.
-Sleep. Not getting at least 6-8 hours of sleep each night is a sure way to fall into depressive type feelings, eventually. You need sleep to retain material.

2. Study groups. Even the closest study group at my school eventually fell apart. In most, but not all cases, they're too inefficient. Why? Because everyone has their own pace. Everyone has their own strengths and weakness. If you're reviewing crap that you're 100% good on, because someone else is weak on it, that is eating away at your time. Plus, when you study with your friends its just way too easy to veer off.
-A good alternative to this...I had a few close friends in my class. We shared notes and kept each other motivated. We had group messaging chats and would just answer any questions we would between our group. Fast, and efficient way of group studying vs meeting up and trying to over things together. My advice- choose friends that are smarter and more motivated than you are. They often will indirectly make you a better person.

3. Keep number of resources small. Focus on class notes more than anything. There isn't enough time in the day to read books, memorize pps, watch lectures, etc. Keep resource number small, figure out where test questions come from and focus on that. Survive your classes before you worry about boards, otherwise you won't get to boards anyways.

4. Don't waste too much time making guides/anki cards. First year I would make study guides for myself where it was a 1 page per 1 hour of lecture fast summary that allowed for quick review. Was super helpful for me. I only dropped it second year because by then I didn't care about grades too much. Second year I would download the powerpoint for class, and immediately delete every PP slide that I felt had no chance of being tested. I would routinely turn a 40 slide PP into 20 or less. Became much faster to review. I wouldn't recommend spending several hours making guides or your own notes tho. Often its a lot of time for limited return and time is your greatest resource in medical school.

5. Don't eat like crap too much. you'll feel like crap. try to exercise every now and then, it gives a feeling of euphoria that coffee gives, but drinking too much caffeine can lead to crashing, exacerbating depression/fatigue.

6. Ignore people who talk about their scores. They're prob lying. The loudest people were usually the ones who did the worst while the quiet ones were the sharpest.

7. Board study. Board study is a culmination of your two years at medical school. If your school is anything like mine, you prob didn't learn too much HY stuff. But thats ok. You should have picked up at least a small foundation of knowledge along the way. You can build off that. I started really studying 6 months out from boards. I won't get too much into that since how people board study for step 1 hasn't changed much since I've been a student and everyone has their own slight variation. But essentially time*effort=success. Thats my formula that I always used. If you spend 12 hours studying with zero effort, you will have 0 success. Both need to be maximized to do well. Studying is not looking at Facebook every 5 mins. Once I was 6mo out, every morning would be nothing but board study. Every afternoon would be class, with the intent to finish class stuff as soon as possible. Your friends, loved ones, family will have to realize this is your time.
-Take the comlex PE seriously. I did an insane amount of studying for it. Too much. Why? Because I'm not lazy and the idea of flying to Philly again to pay >1000 and do OMM did not sound like a good day. What I did was the Kauffman stuff, in addition it thought of all the common stuff you see in FM, as well as screening cases, and wrote down guides of what questions I would ask/what PE id perform as well as A/Ps.
-Step 2 learn from your rotations and do questions nonstop. Most of the book sources sucked for step 2. Onlinemeded is gold. Helps for step 2 and you'll look like a baller on clinical rotations.

8. For clinical years, its totally ok to sound stupid. I work with med students and sometimes they sound stupid. I don't call them out for this because I was there. I care more about if you are in a positive mood/friendly than how much you know. A positive student can be taught to learn more than a negative student who thinks he knows everything. Most attending won't judge you for sounding dumb, or doing dumb things. The person who will judge you the most, is you. So ease up on yourself. Sometimes you'll feel tired, or maybe a little depressed. At that point its best to take some time out for yourself after youre done with your shift and pursue a hobby. If you feel overwhelmed, talk to a resident that is easy going. Most will understand and could offer further advice. Chances are, they feel the same, lol. Once on my unit I had one patient having sx of stroke while simultaneously another pt having sx of a MI while my attending was at another clinic. So yea. it happens.

9. When applying to residency, have zero regrets. you can always make the money back. I recommend over applying because why not? you don't get dinged for applying to 100 residencies and you can always cancel interviews. You can't cancel interviews you don't have. Unless you're a rockstar applicant for your field, look at the average amount of places to apply to, and apply to more then that. Not even joking. My program gets an insane number of applicants, and during residency season you're just a piece of a paper before you get an interview.

10. Find someone you can confide in. Helps if they know what you're going through. Sometimes having someone to blow off steam to/complain to can make you feel a bit better. Just do all of it at home, and don't bring any to work/school

ok, that was just some random stuff I thought of. Feel free to ask questions if you think I may have an answer. I may or may not have one. Dunno. Goodluck DOs.
Very thorough and accurate. Much better guide than Goro's thread.
 

kovalchuk71

10+ Year Member
Jan 27, 2009
1,155
873
Funny enough, yesterday I started writing a page of "Important" topics that I felt were high yield immediately after lecture was complete. I found that it really helped things "stick".
 
  • Like
Reactions: Shotapp

NecrotizingFasciitis

SDN Bronze Donor
Bronze Donor
2+ Year Member
Jul 15, 2015
1,514
2,293
Status
Medical Student
Needed this. Have been trying to figure out whether I want to attend class or not. I'm going to skip going to class this week; give it a whirl!

Also, an interesting topic I'm sure is covered somewhere on here... How much should we really focus on classes? I have a couple friends in MS2 who have echoed what you said about not focusing as much on class, and instead focusing studying on board resources for classes (I know in MS1 it's a bit premature, but I'm curious.)

e.g.) Instead of attempting to memorize every word of the lectures for biochemistry, grabbing some kind of board resource and working on biochemistry out of there. Performing "OK" on exams for school, but (hopefully) increasing your potential score on board exams by hitting board material exclusively, and early on. I'd imagine you may also save time in this way as well?
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: kovalchuk71

kovalchuk71

10+ Year Member
Jan 27, 2009
1,155
873
Needed this. Have been trying to figure out whether I want to attend class or not. I'm going to skip going to class this week; give it a whirl!

Thanks so much for your post.
I like it a lot better for the exact reasons OP mentioned. Unfortunately, my school has mandatory attendance, but I still have teachers that tell us that they don't care if we attend or not.
 
OP
G

grapefruit17

Needed this. Have been trying to figure out whether I want to attend class or not. I'm going to skip going to class this week; give it a whirl!

Also, an interesting topic I'm sure is covered somewhere on here... How much should we really focus on classes? I have a couple friends in MS2 who have echoed what you said about not focusing as much on class, and instead focusing studying on board resources for classes (I know in MS1 it's a bit premature, but I'm curious.)

e.g.) Instead of attempting to memorize every word of the lectures for biochemistry, grabbing some kind of board resource and working on biochemistry out of there. Performing "OK" on exams for school, but (hopefully) increasing your potential score on board exams by hitting board material exclusively, and early on. I'd imagine you may also save time in this way as well?
first year I recommend focusing entirely on classes as board studying this early is unlikely to benefit you. Plus whatever time you have left over can be spent on relaxing/enjoying your life. When you become a resident you don't get to sleep in and decide if you want to take the day off, lol. So enjoy medical school years while you can.

second year the percent of class studying you do depends on difficulty of the test, how your grades are trending.

side note: I interviewed at Kansas, Kansas City is a beautiful city
 
OP
G

grapefruit17

I had a lot of mandatory attendance second year during board season.

Ill just throw this out there. Goro don't read this so no judgement is passed by faculty ; ). I would often take long bathroom breaks during lecture that lead me to the library doing UWORLD questions.

also at that point is where it became a fight for the last row..however I would never sit in the last row because you were easily noticed if you left. I would make sure I sat where people surrounded me lol.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
10+ Year Member
Nov 10, 2009
16,183
5,485
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Needed this. Have been trying to figure out whether I want to attend class or not. I'm going to skip going to class this week; give it a whirl!

Also, an interesting topic I'm sure is covered somewhere on here... How much should we really focus on classes? I have a couple friends in MS2 who have echoed what you said about not focusing as much on class, and instead focusing studying on board resources for classes (I know in MS1 it's a bit premature, but I'm curious.)

e.g.) Instead of attempting to memorize every word of the lectures for biochemistry, grabbing some kind of board resource and working on biochemistry out of there. Performing "OK" on exams for school, but (hopefully) increasing your potential score on board exams by hitting board material exclusively, and early on. I'd imagine you may also save time in this way as well?
First year is a lot of busy work, between anatomy lab and os and pcm. You'll be coming home at around 6 usually. So I usually stayed on campus the whole day.
Come second year and I basically lived at home all the time. No point in going to lectures at all.

In terms of focusing on class. You should do it a lot first year. You need to get the basic physiology down hard so that you're not playing catch up second year. But aside from that I didn't spend that much time preparing for the boards until after spring break. My friend who also did pretty well on boards didn't start until dedicated. I would say that you have enough time during dedicated with 8 weeks. Second year you're studying for boards either way, so maybe instead of doing a 3rd read through of robbins, maybe look into some more extensive pathophysiology or watch sketchymedical for pharm instead of cramming drugs and learn them for real?

Either way, first year isn't high yield boards material. So don't bother trying to study for the boards, you're aiming for a foundation here. So get first aid and annotate some of the physiology sections and you're already ahead of the curve. Also learn to watch tv and or exercise.
 
About the Ads