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anatomy

Discussion in 'Step I' started by medicinehopeful, May 7, 2007.

  1. medicinehopeful

    medicinehopeful Member 5+ Year Member

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    0
    Sep 17, 2004
    hi everyone,
    i've started doing random blocks in qbank, and the anatomy questions always get me. i've read the hy gross anatomy book along with the systems. i once read on the forum that reading the blue boxes in moore is very helpful. i'm taking my step 1 during the third week of june. we end second year next week, after which i have four weeks to study. has anyone tried to study anatomy by reading the blue boxes? has it been helpful? any other suggestions?
     
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  3. lord_jeebus

    lord_jeebus 和魂洋才 Moderator Physician 10+ Year Member

    5,818
    144
    Jul 12, 2003
    GMT+9
    I think that many of QBank's anatomy questions are too difficult, in the wrong kind of way. They emphasize random details of often unimportant things whereas the test looks for your gross spatial understanding and ability to interpret imaging of key structures.

    I think the blue boxes are worth reviewing and will cover much of the anatomy questions that cover clinical correlates, but not all.
     
  4. Doc 2b

    Doc 2b 5+ Year Member

    594
    1
    May 19, 2004
    I'm having the same issue. Like not knowing which cord of the bracial plexis the nerve that innervates the adductor pollicus originates from. I mean, I'm good at anatomy but WTF? What pisses me off, is once I read the explanation it all makes total f'n sense. It's the little things I miss.
     
  5. goodies

    goodies Member 7+ Year Member

    334
    0
    Oct 8, 2005
    NY
    which is better... hy anatomy or kaplan antaomy? how come no one ever talks about neuroanatomy? is it not hy or what?
     
  6. lord_jeebus

    lord_jeebus 和魂洋才 Moderator Physician 10+ Year Member

    5,818
    144
    Jul 12, 2003
    GMT+9
    Search the forum for "neuroanatomy" and see what you've missed...
     

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