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Anesthesia Oral Board Prep

Discussion in 'Anesthesiology' started by timtye78, Oct 21, 2006.

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  1. timtye78

    timtye78 Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Oct 22, 2003
    Can someone tell me their basic recommendations for preparing for the oral boards besides general studying and completion of residency?

    In December, my class is having our first Mock Oral exam. Should I get some oral board review book? Should I just keep up my normal reading?

    Beyond that, what are some of the top oral board review books and authors? What are the best courses, and are there some good audio reviews as well?

    Last question, in preparing for the oral boards, would it give me more time to study if I was in a fellowship or academic position while preparing for it?

    Thanks
     
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  3. johankriek

    johankriek Banned Banned 2+ Year Member

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    great question tim..


    I will answer it....


    MICHAEL HO.. ESSENTIAL BOARD REVIEW.. CALL HIM NOW AND SET UP SOME TIME FOR HIS COURSE...


    the exam means too much to leave to chance.. you need focused training.. michael ho will offer that...... expecially his 20 must know cases.... even the professors cant answer board exam questions as succinctly and precise as him. we had a top professor former oral board examiner give a few lectures during michael ho's class.. i thought he was very loose and muddy thinking compared to michael HO..
     
  4. bubalus

    bubalus Member 5+ Year Member

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    I wouldn't take an oral board review course as a CA2 in preparation for a mock oral. Overkill. Take it at a more appropriate time.

    The advice I was given is simple and sounds a little flip, but it's actually pretty good advice: Listen to the question. Answer the question.

    If you've got some OCD that just won't go away, look at Board Stiff Too.
     
  5. UTSouthwestern

    UTSouthwestern 1K Member Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    I'll say one thing about the oral boards in that it isn't testing your knowledge base. From the time you take the writtens, if you keep reviewing the material until the time you are scheduled to take the orals in a reasonable fashion (few hours a week), you will likely have all the knowledge base you need for the orals.

    This is a test of reaction and adjustment, not knowledge. It is a test to see if you can LOGICALLY and CLEARLY present an anesthetic plan and truly function as a consultant. In that sense, you will need to be able to know when you should defer to subspecialists and when you should be able to comfortably state the safety of bringing a patient to the OR.

    Understand that your oral board cases are likely to be the most difficult cases you have ever seen in an academic center or as straightforward a case as you commonly see in private practice. There will always be flexibility built into each case to allow the examiners some wiggle room to push the limits of your adaptability (29 y/o female, G1PO, 29 weeks gestation, s/p MVC with traumatic descending thoracic aortic dissection and CT positive subdural hematoma; followed by 36 y/o male, 5'11" 165, with severe PCN and latex allergies, otherwise healthy, coming in for lap chole, 2/6 systolic murmur noted on preop exam).

    Ho, Jensen, Board Stiff Too, etc. all present similar philosophies about how to attack the boards: Read the question, outline the pertinent issues in a framework of preop, intraop, and postop time frames, and never let the patient go back to the OR without having addressed the major issues and questions. If the examiner puts you in the OR, it should be only after you stated your completion of the preop preparatory phase.

    Preop issues typically include the general stability of the patient, vital signs, preop tests (EKG, CXR, lab work, etc.). Do what is necessary in a focused fashion. Take the shotgun approach and you will open up a can of worms for the examiners to feed on (why did you order the expensive thallium dipyridamole examination when a simple stress test would have sufficed? Did you really mean to order a contrast CT in this diabetic, hypertensive patient with chronic renal insufficiency? While waiting for your emergent MRI of the spine for bilateral lower extremity radiculopathy, your patient exsanguinates in the radiology holding area, etc.).

    Intraop issues are obviously where the topics can vary greatly. Staying up to date on your review material after the writtens will save you a great deal of time in preparing for this phase of your oral board question. Always know what plan B, C, D, E, etc. would be in every scenario. Don't fret over drug dosages, drug limits, and subspecialty issues that only subspecialists should take care of (i.e. delivering a baby). Provide the anesthetic, protect the patient, and put the subspecialist in the scenario when they should be there (see first example case above - once you go to the OR to fix the highest priority problem - exsanguination via ruptured thoracic aorta, bring in the obstetrician to monitor the baby with you keeping mom stable, mom in left uterine tilt, etc. ready for a C section should it be necessary and not affect mom, or if mom is a lost cause and baby is salvageable).

    Postop issues commonly include vent management, ICU sedation, PONV, rebleeding, a return to the OR and when to go, appropriate use of consultants and tests, and a variety of medicolegal issues. You may do everything right and the patient still dies. It is up to the examiner to determine if you did everything logically, in the proper sequence, and with the proper priority and urgency.

    Lastly, don't argue with the examiners, but likewise, reaffirm your position if you feel that you are being led down a path toward mass destruction. They will get you there regardless of what you say, but if you have noted your objection previously, you have already shown that you would not purposefully put a patient at risk and the examiner will have had to change the examination scenario to put you at that position (in other words, you have scored points with examiner for not falling into a trap). Don't "force" the examiner to give you a test result or lab value after they have previously stated that you have been given all that is available, or if they have stated that something is stable ("Are you absolutely certain my patient doesn't have hemoglobinuria?").

    This is my primer for the oral boards. While my classmates took Ho, Jensen, or both, I read Board Stiff Too, found and read an old Jensen review course manual once, reread Morgan & Mikhail, and did one mock oral with a Southwestern attending and one with a classmate. I started a little late because of the echocardiography boards, but with a reasonable amount of time to review enough information as well as practice. I was able to pass without taking any time off from work, though I was a little stressed given how busy we were this past summer.

    Be honest in your personal assessment: Are you a good speaker? Is your fund of knowledge adequate? Are you adaptable in pressure situations or do you tend to go into a shell? The answers to these questions will help you determine how best to prepare (information review, mock orals, both, etc.). For myself, I believe that I am comfortable in public speaking situations as well as adaptable in those situations, therefore I spent most of my time reviewing information while framing it in the context of an oral examination in my mind. For some of my colleagues, multiple practice examinations was the way to go to keep on top of their biggest hurdles (nervousness, tendencies to stutter, etc.).

    Edit: For the younger residents in training, use your everyday cases as an opportunity to start thinking like a consultant and practice framing one case each day into the oral board situation. Ask your attendings to be your examiners and use a case each day to discuss what issues could be brought up during an oral examination (assuming your attendings have taken and passed the orals).
     
  6. timtye78

    timtye78 Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Oct 22, 2003
    thanks for excellent reply!
     
  7. CambieMD

    CambieMD cambiemd 10+ Year Member

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    "Understand that your oral board cases are likely to be the most difficult Ho, Jensen, Board Stiff Too, etc. all present similar philosophies about how to attack the boards: Read the question, outline the pertinent issues in a framework of preop, intraop, and postop time frames, and never let the patient go back to the OR without having addressed the major issues and questions. If the examiner puts you in the OR, it should be only after you stated your completion of the preop preparatory phase".


    I think that this is good advice UT. I am not that worried about the written exam. Sitting in front of a panel of experts and being asked what if questions can be challenging.

    I am going to print your post . Formulating an anesthetic plan on all your patients and being able to defend it seems be helpful practice for an oral exam. Some may argue that this should be done with all cases, anyway.

    What do you think about Anesthesia and Co-existing disease.Some of my attendings swear by that book for board preperation.

    UT, any thoughts will be appreciated.

    Cambie
     
  8. UTSouthwestern

    UTSouthwestern 1K Member Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    The ability to formulate, excute, and alter an anesthetic plan is the essence of an anesthesiology residency. Everyone in training and in practice should be doing this. In residency, the planning itself is the challenge. In practice, streamlining becomes more of an issue.

    Anesthesia and Coexisting Disease is a great text to use for the orals. Don't get bogged down in too many details as the full text covers pathology from every discipline and you are not expected to have full knowledge of every pathology from every discipline that is included in that text. Be able to pick up on the salient anesthetic issues and highlight those issues as you read the text.

    I read it as a resident, but in reviewing for the orals, touched on it only when I wanted to clarify any details I felt my other review material was vague on.

    Again, most of the information in the review courses/materials is redundant. If you have studied one text in detail, use it for your primary review material. You can then pick a review course to review for the boards, with the bulk of your studying already completed and have the review material function as a supplement to your primary study text.
     
  9. johankriek

    johankriek Banned Banned 2+ Year Member

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    I cant disagree with you more UTSOUTHWESTERN, Not only is the oral testing yourknowledge base, but it is also testing your ability to recall it in a real situation and your ability to apply it. so this is not accurate statement.


    For example, i was asked specifically about about the difference in symptoms of someone with spinal stenosis and someone with Spondylolisthesis. thats pretty friggin specific if you ask me...

    the whole exam wasnt like this, but once you started reading and applying the knowledge,, you will see how much you DONT KNOW..
     
  10. Khalid

    Khalid Junior Member 7+ Year Member

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    As always, UT, very informative post! Wish me luck on April 16!
     
  11. foshizzo

    foshizzo Junior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Anyone out there taken both Jenson and Ho for the oral exam prep? If so, which course did you feel was better?
     
  12. foshizzo

    foshizzo Junior Member 10+ Year Member

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    May 12, 2004
    Found an answer to my question after doing a search far back enough...

    06-03-2006, 01:12 PM
    Kwijibo
    Member

    I took both and passed thank god! and I didn't pick up a laryngoscope since finishing residency.
    Ho and Jensen are quite different courses. Both are good, and I would recommend both to anyone. Here's what I think about them:
    Ho offers more basic medical teaching in his course. He will go over a case in front of the entire group. He likes to hear himself talk sometimes and will go over very basic material(like pulse oximetry) and will spend alot of time on basic, basic stuff. You will cover approximately 1 test an hour. He does not give much feedback to the examinee in regards to their style.
    Jensen's course is set up to cover as many exams as possible. He does not spend time going over the facts of the exam he gives to the examinee. He will spend 20 minutes or so on an exam and spend 15 minutes going over the answers to the questions he asked. He will tell you how to answer the questions. You obviously go over many more exams in this fashion. Jensen expects you to know Bid Red cold. I think that is why some people don't like his style. Jensens critiques the examinees style and tells them how to improve and what to watch out for.
    Both examiners are aggressive examiners and you can take alot from each. I took jensen's in about march and Ho right before the exam. If I could do it again I would do it the other way around. I found myself days before the exam listening to basic stuff that I should have already known by this point in the game. I would have liked to just bang out as many exams as possible right before the exam if I could.
    If I could chose one, I would chose Jensen. The Lubarsky book is a nice read as well. The whole test is about how you can answer a question. Not necessarilly what you know. My friend knew more than I did and failed because he was not ready for an aggressive examiner and did not practice enough oral exams. Don't go into it unprepared.
     
  13. Laurel123

    Laurel123 Member 7+ Year Member

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    If this is a mock oral, then just go 'enjoy' the experience. It will be painful and embarrassing no matter what and you will feel like an idiot. But who cares, it is just to learn. I would continue your regular studying for residency and just absorbing info.

    Then after you are done with residency and have passed your writtens, go and sign up for Michael Ho course. It is awesome. I took it a month before the boards and did fine and felt prepared. I am private practice and had time to study.
     
  14. UTSouthwestern

    UTSouthwestern 1K Member Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    For BIS40 and all the other studs and studettes that passed the writtens. :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
     
  15. pmichaelmd

    pmichaelmd Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    As I join your legions, I continue to appreciate your informative and insightful posts. Thanks again!

    Cheers,
    PMMD
     
  16. Noyac

    Noyac ASA Member SDN Advisor 10+ Year Member

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    One more piece of advice that a former partner of mine gave me. She had a problem with tachycardia in stressful situations. For her Mock Orals she could feel her heart wanting to jump out of her chest. She decided to take metoprolol for the real Orals and said that it controlled her racing heart and inabled her to concentrate better.

    I don't know how well it works since I don't think I have this problem of tachycardia but if I do, I am unaware of it. I just thought it was clever.
     
  17. UTSouthwestern

    UTSouthwestern 1K Member Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    That was one thing I was thinking about recommending as well. A lot of the people in my group told me that they had just taken some metoprolol. Wouldn't you know that if I took it, I'd probably drop my heart rate to 10 and pass out or die.

    Also, a good friend of mine spent the day before at the hotel spa, just getting massages and relaxing by the pool. Said that was the best thing she could have done to relax herself.

    I must have missed johankriek's post earlier about the knowledge part. Obviously, you have to have the knowledge to take the orals, and the assumption is that if you pass the writtens, you have a good portion of that requirement taken care of already, assuming you retain well. Your reactions and ability to calmly, logically, and concisely present your plans and alternatives will be what the examiners are looking for. Of course you can easily shoot yourself in the foot and give sux to treat a seizing patient, raise the room temperature for a patient with emerging MH, etc. I wonder if anyone has ever proposed something like that in his/her oral board exam?
     
  18. Divalydz

    Divalydz

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    Hi!

    Dr. Ho's review is great if you're looking for a general overview of both the written and oral sections.

    Dr. Niels Jensen's review is quite extensive for preparation for the written section. His books are a bit pricey, but they are very comprehensive and offer up a smorgasbord of information for the written section of the boards.

    Dr. Chris Gallagher's Board Stiff Live is the best for the oral portion. This one is a bit different, in that the ratio is 1:4 (whereas Jensen's is 1:600), so it's more like the actual exam, with one board-certified doctor to four students. I highly recommend this one if you're a bit shaky on the oral bit.

    Hope this helps. One or more of these courses should set you well on your way to board-certification!
     
  19. johankriek

    johankriek Banned Banned 2+ Year Member

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    this is so funny

    since you are a new member i bet you have interest in board stiff live

    michael ho is the best..... if you follow his outline and are serious.. you WILL pass no problem..
     
  20. milrisome

    milrisome 2+ Year Member

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    Took Propranolol for a couple weeks ahead of time. Started at 10mg, worked up to 40mg bid. Usually get a little jittery, dry mouth, etc. with public speaking or other stressful situations. Went into the boards and had none of that. I felt totally calm. I recommend it highly if you tend to react to anxiety-provoking situations.
     
  21. johankriek

    johankriek Banned Banned 2+ Year Member

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    I have another thing that will help anxiety in these situations..... Being prepared... works just as good as propranolol
     
  22. Divalydz

    Divalydz

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    Johankriek:
    have you tried Board Stiff Live? i mean, it really is a great course, and it's really relaxed. apparently, it's only been running for a couple years now, but i went to the course in LA recently, and i have to say that the combination of different testing styles of the various board-certified doctors who administered the mock orals really left me feeling confident that anyone could pass, no matter how much of a hard-ass the actual examiner might be during the real thing.

    i'm not dissing Dr. Ho, though. i'm sure that he has some great courses, as well, but they are more general, whereas Board Stiff Live is more specific to confidence-building, communication, knowledge, and simulation of the actual boards. i guess it just depends on what kind of review you're looking for.

    bottom line: if you need to build knowledge, go to Jensen or Ho. if you need to build confidence and practice for the real thing, go to Board Stiff Live.
     
  23. johankriek

    johankriek Banned Banned 2+ Year Member

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    I thought board still live was cost prohibitive...


    I mean Ho and Jensen are cost prohibitive....


    board still live is like 5 times the cost i thought when i looked into it


    I dont know anything about that course..
     
  24. Divalydz

    Divalydz

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    well, it costs about the same amount as Jensen's, once you factor in Big Red, Ranger Red, Spiels, and the other add-ons. board stiff includes the cost of the course materials in the cost of the course. i see what you mean, though. all these courses are kinda pricey, but well worth it because they're time-effective. i.e. they make the studying process more efficient, wouldn't you agree?
     
  25. johankriek

    johankriek Banned Banned 2+ Year Member

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    I will agree whole heartedly. I would pay for the course because as i said the cost of failure is too much(return trip to board city, definite board review course, full year of worrying, another 2K board fee etc etc etc). Probably the cost of failure in dollar amount is 10K and the cost in real amount is un measurable.. so I figured i would lay the 3k up front for a review course.. That being said there are people who dont take any review course and pass.. i wasnt comfortable doing that knowing the character of the ABA
     
  26. Divalydz

    Divalydz

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    you're so right. it's uncomfortable to speak in public in the first place; with the added stress of the exam and the mood of the examiner, it makes the stress almost overwhelming, which can potentially overshadow one's knowledge and ability. the courses are well worth the cost to ease one's mind about the exam itself.
     
  27. MAlcid

    MAlcid

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    I just wanted to share my anesthesiology oral board preparation experiences with you all. I recently became board certified largely from the help of Dr Tran and his new oral board preparation course. The website is www.justoralboards.com. This is a new program designed for 1 on 1 personalized training, which the Michael Ho course did not provide for me. Dr Tran's course is scientifically structured and feedbacks are consultant quality. I took the Michael Ho course twice without a successful result. It only took me 6 mock oral sessions with Dr Tran to become a board certified consultant! I recommend Dr Tran's course to all who wants to become board certified in one attempt.
     
  28. MAlcid

    MAlcid

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    I just wanted to share my anesthesiology oral board preparation experiences with you all. I recently became board certified largely from the help of Dr Tran and his new oral board preparation course. The website is www.JustOralBoards.com. This is a new program designed for 1 on 1 personalized training, which the Michael Ho course did not provide for me. Dr Tran's course is scientifically structured and feedbacks are consultant Harvard quality. I took the Michael Ho course twice without a successful result. It only took me 6 mock oral sessions with Dr Tran to become a board certified consultant! I recommend Dr Tran's course to all who wants to become board certified in one attempt.
     
  29. chimango

    chimango

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    I just found out today that I passed my oral boards and Michael Ho's course was simply the best!! I had failed on my first attempt and his course gave me the confidence and knowledge I lacked.

    His review book was high-yield and although it doesn't cover everything; it is a great way to start. It was my #1 source. The question and answer format in the book was a great way to review topics.

    Since his course is intense, I would recommend going to a course a couple of months before your actual boards to get an idea of what to expect. Then I would polish your knowledge and speaking by going to his 4 day crash course. In my opinion, if you wait until the 4 day crash course (which is the weekend before the actual boards), you may be doing a disservice to yourself as the amount of material he covers is phenomenal. High yield, but a lot to absorb.

    Take my advice. Take his course. It's simply the most efficient way to prepare yourself for the boards. Also, take as many mock orals with colleagues, fellow residents, former attendings, and Dr. Ho himself.

    If you have any questions, please feel free to respond.
     
  30. pmichaelmd

    pmichaelmd Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Georgia
    Greetings. I just found out that I passed my orals as well. For what it's worth, I'll share my prep.

    I didn't take any of the review courses. I had a copy of Ho's review book and read it cover to cover once. I then read Board Stiff Too cover to cover. I found the first half (the "academic half") to be the more helpful. I then went through all of the cases in my oral board case text by Loushin. I used his written board text as well for my writtens and found it very useful. I think his website is anesthesiahq.com or something. Anyhow, I found his cases and answers to be most representative of what I saw on the real deal.

    In the end, the most important things I did were to read cases aloud to myself and do mock orals with my partners. There really is no substitute for practice. Oh, I almost forgot. I did a lot of reading from Yao & Artusio and found his Q&A, while somewhat more detailed than necessary, to be excellent. If you can answer like Yao, you are board-certifiable :)

    Congrats to all of my colleagues who also passed..onward and upward!

    Cheers,
    PMMD
     
  31. drfeelgood

    drfeelgood Born-again Baseball Fan 10+ Year Member

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    I failed the orals the first time i took it and it sucked....but i passed this time by taking Micheal Ho's must know cases two days before my exam. I also took the Board Stiff Live class in las vegas in August. Most people who take the board stiff live have failed once or twice because it is so expensive ($2,500) I needed to take it because english is my second language and i'm not a very talkative person. They have a 75% pass rate which is good considering most of the people there are repeat takers who normally have much lowering pass rates than first time U.S. MDs. anesthesiahq.com stuff is good too. I did 5 of their exams the week prior to boards week. I dont know how much it costs cuz i got a photocopy if it. Hope this helps.... congrats to all who passed and for those who failed hold your head up high and keep on plugging away at it. Each article you read...each CME conference you go to....each simulated patient you do in your head gets you one step closer to the goal of being a consultant...diplomate of the ABA

    My struggles with this BEAST the last year and a half have made me much stronger and more consultant like in my approach to patients and my interactions with my surgical colleagues. Again what doesn't kill you makes stronger.:)

    Feel free to PM me if you need any help or study materials. Or need to do a mock oral over the phone.

    DR Feelgood...... Now i will roll myself a phat one and smoke it!! Holla at ur boYYY!!!:laugh:
     
  32. PaiN2008

    PaiN2008

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    I have been out of residency for several years, I passed the writtens without any difficulty. But I have struggled over the years with the oral exams. As someone else mentioned the oral exam is does require a level of knowledge to pass, but the goal is to see how you use it, your judgement, flexibility, and ability to defend your positions.

    It is very much about your presentation. This was my last attempt at the Oral exams. I signed up for the HO coarse several months before, and it was excellent. It covers a broad knowledge base, but gives you many opportunities to perform Mock exams with examiners, and other candidates. It let me identify areas I needed to work on. Which ultimately for me was a "stage fright" reaction to being questioned by the examiners.

    I then went back for the 4 day crash coarse, and the must know cases right before the exam. It was the best thing I could have done. It help me practice my speaking, and desensitize myself to the process of being examined.

    I found out yesterday that I passed, and I truly feel it was because of attending DR. Ho's coarse. Most of the people at the coarse that I saw after their exam felt the same way. I recommend it to everyone.
     
  33. mille125

    mille125 7+ Year Member

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    i second this recommendation
     
  34. Tristatemd

    Tristatemd

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    You need advice studying for the oral boards? Well "it depends"...It depends on your needs and how good you are.

    I know some people who passed without much preparation, but that's a crap shoot. I don't recommend it.

    My recommendation is to
    1. Get the Michael Ho book and read it at least three times.

    2. Do real practice mock orals (I did 29, Michael Ho said he did 15). I recommend people who are smarter than you. If you're having trouble finding people, visit http://www.justoralboards.com

    3. Take Michael Ho's 4 day course the week before the boards


    That's what I recommend, and especially for those of us who have the pleasure of repeating the exam. Let's just say, if I can pass anyone can pass. If you want to know, I just recently passed the exam (Arizona Sep, 2008) on the third attempt. I was a nervous wreck. Furthermore, I passed the written exam on the first attempt with a very, very good score. If I failed the oral boards this year, I would have had to repeat the written exam.

    C. Izeogu
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2008
  35. Tristatemd

    Tristatemd

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    Some of the examiners from the justoralboard course took Michael Ho's course when they took their own exams.
     
  36. apma77

    apma77 Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    i didnt take any review course and neither did several collegues who passed 2 days ago...NO HO NO JENSEN...my suggestion

    1) get hold of HO's notes from someone who took his course and read the parts you are weak on
    2) Do practice mock orals with a friend/attendings ---as many as you can

    save your money and spend it on the party celebration after!!
     
  37. maceo

    maceo Banned 2+ Year Member

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    or spent it on the repeat fee 1800.. plane trip 500 hotel room 500 more board exams 3000..

    Just do it right the first time.. Michael HO essential board review. he is the only guy in america who has a formula of success.. and yes it does depend.. everything depends..
     
  38. BISof60

    BISof60 A polite young man 2+ Year Member

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    I, too, am looking for a copy of the Michael Ho course text and course workbook. Please PM me.
     
  39. apma77

    apma77 Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    I am selling my copy ..PM me
     
  40. foursthecharm

    foursthecharm

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    Oct 15, 2008
    Start by reading Anesthesia & Coexisting Disease. Attend Michael Ho's courses--I attended the 6 day ultimate review in Houston, TX this past July and then one of his weekend courses in August in Newark, NJ. It helps you understand how to think and prepare for this test. The orals are a different animal from the writtens. I selectively read chapters in Ho's textbook. I haven't done OB in 4 years so I read and reread that section quite a bit. I had signed up for the 4 day course right before the week of the oral boards but I bailed out because I felt prepared by then and didn't want to be in a room full of nail-biting, anxiety ridden people. I've heard, however, that the 4 day review before the boards is high yield and that he can actually predict what question will be given depending on the day and time of the exam. Ho has studied the oral exam better than anybody out there. Don't waste your time or $$$ with Ranger Warrior Neils or whatever his name is. If you do that course, you'll fail the boards.

    I did close to 20 mock orals with faculty where I trained. I also did mocks at the Ho course. You have to do mock orals and get comfortable talking about anesthesiology. I also read Reed's book, my old notes and another good book, "Crisis Management in Anesthesiology". It is a small book that is extremely high yield. You'll have a disaster scenario on your orals---you better know how to deal with it. It is inevitable.

    Start early and take the orals seriously. I nailed them on my first try. It took me 3x's for the writtens. Good luck. The ABA doesn't give certification away for free. You'll have to work for it.
     
  41. objdoc

    objdoc ASA Member 10+ Year Member

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    Oct 22, 2006
    Simply amazing, how many people with 1 or 2 posts come out to pitch Ho or Justoralboards on this and other threads. Sometimes repeating the same phrasing or even the entire exact post. Hope this is just a coincidence, but for me I would prefer an honest "you should buy my product because..." post.

    Edit: that being said, many reliable contributors liked the same courses
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2008
  42. drfeelgood

    drfeelgood Born-again Baseball Fan 10+ Year Member

    140
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    May 4, 2002
    Southern California
    I Hate Micheal Ho cuz he's a gozillionere and my hard earn $$$ paid 4 his gold 25 inch rims on his V-12 AMG mercedes but he is the best at oral board prep. Jensen is good at helping you memorize lines!!! Dont know anything about Justoralboards. and No.. im not an agent of MichealHoWealthManagementCompany.com!!!!!
    :laugh:
     
  43. Tristatemd

    Tristatemd

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    Oct 14, 2008
    I agree
     
  44. Tristatemd

    Tristatemd

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    Oct 14, 2008
    Some of us are just going by personal experience. Preparing for this exam is a personal experience. Imagine someone who knows a lot of anesthesia but fails the oral exam anyway because of either poor communication, disorganization or profound anxiety. I don't get any stipend for pitching Michael Ho's course (not yet :laugh:)...
     
  45. gasdocmd

    gasdocmd 5+ Year Member

    8
    3
    Oct 12, 2008
    i just passed this year after taking all 3 courses, jenson, ho, and gallagher. all have pros and cons, but what ho :thumbup: offers that the others don't is a comprehensive treatment that's up to date and 100% accurate. the guy must read all the time. plus, he models answers like the real thing. during the course, he actually took a live exam from one of his very obnoxious examiners (not staged), and did great. he actually talks the talk and walks the walk. watching him give and take an exam made me finally understand what it's all about. also, he doesn't have a bone to pick with the ABA, he believes becoming a good physician/consultant is a worthy goal. imagine that! :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:!!!!!!! i can honestly say that his course not only helped me pass, it helped the way i think and talk to others. i have to disagree with others who say that you don't get confident enough taking his course. ho says knowledge is the #1 reason people fail, and he's right. his course gives you so much knowledge, you get more confident knowing what to say. that beats practicing with nothing to say. besides, you do get mock orals during his course, as you do with all courses. i will say one disappointed thing about his book however: it's meaty, but has many typos :thumbdown: so reader beware. another bummer :thumbdown:thumbdown: none of these courses offer cme. you'd think the amount we pay them, they could get their acts together and offer cme! the final winner is...ho, hands down! :thumbup:
     
  46. anessha

    anessha

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    Oct 15, 2008
    My recommendation is the Michael Ho course-- I would sign up as early as possible to get the textbook-- it is almost 800 pages of well organized oral board format material-- if you can get through this book at least once before the course it will be of great benefit-- the mock orals at the course build confidence and oral exam skill sets. In addition he offers a must know cases 2 day course that follows the basic course-- the must know cases course was great- essentially you cover 20 common exams and by the end of the second day you feel as though you are finally ready for this test.

    The more oral exams that you can do between now and the test the better off you will be. Find a tough examiner also-- you need to be challenged during this process.
     
  47. pmichaelmd

    pmichaelmd Senior Member 10+ Year Member

    312
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    Sep 14, 2003
    Georgia
    I will also say this for those getting prepared for this test. I didn't get the sense that the examiners were looking to fail me. As you've undoubtedly heard before, they often may guide you in the appropriate direction if you start going far afield. That isn't to say that there aren't a few that would happily trap you if you say something off of the beaten path, but I've heard many a tale of "normal," reassuring examiners leading the examinee in the right direction. In many cases, it's a game of "guess what I'm thinking," so it's only right. Of course, if you say or do something ridiculous, like refuse to perform a life-saving procedure b/c "that's not what I do in my practice," you can expect to repeat.

    Man, I had quite a time when I got to Phoenix and had myself all worked up. I was looking out for all of the "big names," and did run into a few. I got off of the plane next to Dr. Barash, walked into Dr. Stoelting as I got off of the elevator the morning of my exam, and ended up with Dr. Chestnut for an OB stem. Definitely made me nervous, but I'm glad I held it together.

    Best of luck to all preparing...I'm sure most of us on the board are happy to help with any advice we might offer.

    Cheers,
    PMMD
     
  48. apma77

    apma77 Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Feb 27, 2003
    seems like Michael Ho's advertising firm is posting on this forum under different screen names....!!!!!!!!
     
  49. nolagas

    nolagas Member 10+ Year Member

    901
    186
    Aug 13, 2004
    Anyone read Decision Making in Anesthesiology by Bready, Noorily, & Dillman?
    It sounds like it would be a good option for oral board prep; and prep in general. Is it?
     
  50. GassiusClay

    GassiusClay PGY-2 2+ Year Member

    120
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    Jan 23, 2007
    Michigan
    In your post on anesthesia oral boards, you mention the ABA character. What do you mean by that?
     
  51. oskigas

    oskigas

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    Oct 14, 2008
    Looking for Ho's Oral board prep material. Pm me if you have one set for sale. Thanks.
     

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