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Applying to MBA

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by freedyx3, Mar 22, 2004.

  1. freedyx3

    freedyx3 I'm Columbian
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    Hey guys,


    Just wondering if you are already accepted to a dental school and you wanted to apply to their business school for the dual degree is it easier to get into the business school? For example columbia offers a dds/mba dual degree program however you have to apply to each seperately. However, the business school is normally extremely difficult to get into. So i'm wondering if it'll be easier for me to get into their business program considering its part of the dual degree.


    thanks
     
  2. sxr71

    sxr71 Senior Member
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    I wondered the same thing when I was there.
     
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  3. I remember Dr. McManus telling us that it is just as hard. They treat you the same as any other applicant..
     
  4. Dentalist

    Dentalist carpe diem
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    Are there certain undergraduate business courses, such as accounting, management, or economics, that one needs to take, in order to apply for MBA program?
     
  5. 3rdMolarRoller

    3rdMolarRoller User Account Deleted
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    To get into a good MBA program you need 600+ on the GMAT, all pre-req (usually accoutning, marketing,management) , and you need atleast of 3 years work experience. I do not mean working for McDonalds...real work in or around management level.

    I had 3 years experience and had to explain why I wanted an MBA so soon. I flat out told them I wanted it bec I will be a dentist one day and wanted to learn all I could about the business world.

    If that doesn't work out, I guess you could always go to a crappy MBA program where the avg GMAT is 500 and no work experience is needed...but it will be a total waste of time!

    Ah yes, and make sure to ask if they have classes that are health care related. For instance I took Health care marketing and planning where I made an actual marketing plan for a dental office (and its still in use), Healthcare law, Employment Law...stuff like that.
     
  6. ShawnOne

    ShawnOne DDS over DMD
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    UNLV also offers a dual DMD/MBA for anybody interested.

    I will post more info on this soon.
     
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  7. scandalouslj

    scandalouslj Upenn Class of 2007
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    It really depends on the school. Here at Penn you have to apply seperatly and pretty mcuh no one gets into Wharton, but you can also go trhough Temple if you want to to do the dual MBA, and they say you have to apply seperately, but I think they do make it a little easier for you. I know I am doing the Masters of Science in Education, and they told uus we were applying seperatly but they made itr way easier for us by using our DAT scores in place of the required GRE, and waived the app fee.
     
  8. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

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    Like my Brocnize posted, probably the most difficult pre-req for MBA programs is the 3-5 years of required work experience. Most programs are looking for FULL-TIME work experience, so for those of us traditional applicants this is hard to come by.

    And, as has been posted, nearly every program considers your application individually from your dental application, so it can be just as difficult to get into top-level MBA programs. Sometimes it is more difficult because they recognize the time requirements of your dental courses as well as the "burn-out" factor.
     
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  9. Jone

    Jone Senior Member
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    Wrong on the pre-req comment... there are no pre-reqs for b-school (besides having a bachelors degree). A large chunk of people who get into Top b-schools have never taken an accounting, marketing, or management class in their lives. You'd be surprised at how many engineers get into B-schools... I think 30% at Kellog in recent years, for example.

    High 600's on GMAT are what you need for a Top program, unless you have something else stellar on your resume, like working for McKinsey or Goldman Sachs. Even then, it's still hard to get in. High 600's are the AVERAGE, so you have to keep in mind that those with low 600's had other knock your socks off credentials that got them in.


     
  10. MunnaBhai MBBS

    MunnaBhai MBBS Junior Member
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    Agree with Jone
    According to my advisor at U of M it was 36% of people who got in the top MBA programs in US were Engineers with very few or no classes in business and very little experience in work.
     
  11. Dentalist

    Dentalist carpe diem
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    So, as a dentist, what can you do with MBA degree?
     
  12. TyLawInt

    TyLawInt Junior Member
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    I have a MS degree in computer information systems from a graduate school of business that also offers MBA degrees. Before I figured out that I didn't want to work in a cubicle all day for the rest of my life and decided to pursue a health-care career, I was contemplating going back to school for my MBA. I was speaking to one of my professors about pursuing this degree, and he gave me this advice:

    Make sure you go to at least a top-20 ranked school because business school is all about the connections you make there. For example, one of the reasons that graduates from schools like Harvard Business School, Wharton, Kellogg, etc. are so successful is because of the people they meet while in school. The reality is, for better or for worse, is that being successful in the business world is highly dependent on your personal network, and much less dependent on your skillset. Obviously if your profession (denistry) requires you to have a certain skillset then this is important, but once you start working, it is your ability to work with people and how well you network (referrals) that will determine your success.

    That being said, I would say that the main reason to persue an MBA degree is surround yourself with people who will be successful in the future, and who will want to do business with you at a later date. It sounds simplistic, but the real way to learn about business is to actually work in a business environment. There are countless stories of people who are successful in business who did not even go to or finish college (Bill Gates), and some who didn't even finish high school (Dave Thomas of Wendy's fame). If your goal is to simply learn about accounting, finance, management, marketing, etc., then I would take these classes at an undergraduate level at your local night school. An MBA is a serious commitment of time and money.

    Just my $.02.
     
  13. 3rdMolarRoller

    3rdMolarRoller User Account Deleted
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    Nope...you are wrong. I applied to three MBA programs and accepted to all of them: UF, UNF, USF. All of them were going to make me take 3 pre-req classes bec I did not have a business degree (and I did take them). The pre-req classes are graduate level bec it was like taking 6 undergrad classes. One was Acct I and II combined; another finance I and II combined and the last class was Management I and II combined.

    If you have the pre-reqs (acct, management, marketing, finance...) you do not have to take these classes! Why would they admit someone into a program with ZERO business knowledge??? There is only so much you can learn out in the real world.

    I gradutaed UF MBA 2003. #11 MBA program last time I checked. So if they require pre-reqs, I'm sure other schools do too!
     
  14. scandalouslj

    scandalouslj Upenn Class of 2007
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    THe top 20 schools might have certain requirments regrading pre-reqs, but I know most schools dont, as I was looking into the Temple and John Hopkins MBA programs, and they require no pre-reqs.
     
  15. lovetractor

    lovetractor Junior Member

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    Actually, I went to a top 40 school and at the time the prereqs were 1 year of Calculus, a semester of Stats, and that was it. The trend nowadays is that they start a month early, say in late July, and have a month-long residency where some basics are taught. I believe the top 20's are going in this direction also.

    An MBA is a very valuable degree providing it's from a quality school, there are too many "in name only" schools that you should stay away from.

    An alternative is to take financial management, financial accounting, economics, and strategic decision making preferably at the graduate level. Beware, however, financial accounting and fincancial management are not easy classes and will require a lot of effort if you don't have prior experience.
     

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