Apptitude!

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by knowthyself, May 26, 2008.

  1. knowthyself

    knowthyself The Underdog

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    Hello you all,
    I know how eager we all are to get into med schools and pursue our dreams. Not many(that includes me!) of us have had a meritorious acads(great GPAs etc) but still have the hopes of going to med school and doing whatever it takes.
    I am struggling with self-doubt, question of whether I really have the apptitude and the ability to do good as I go ahead. I had my shares of ups and downs(more downs I would say) but there have been times when I got serious(focused) ,had a goal, and acheived it. But that 'pot' is smaller compared to the other one! Unfortunately because of all this, I am becoming sluggish in my pursuit and so am looking for true life inspirtation.
    I would so like to believe in ''We are what we do REPEATEDLY
    Then EXCELLENCE is not an act, but a HABIT''! Can we really get rid of our old habits?
    Have you ever had an episode of self-doubt? Questions about your ability? How did you cope with it? How did you get yourself out of that whirlpool? How did you gain confidence in yourself?
    Looking for a great feedback!
    TIA:)
     
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  3. McSnappy

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    Most Medical students I know including those who are non-trads have:
    1. Doubt
    2. Willingness to make a decision
    3. Commitment to a decision.
    4. Dogged determination
    5. Belief in a larger purpose for their lives

    Once you make up your mind, you demand nothing but finishing it. No outs!
    Faith.
     
  4. Empi

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    Sometimes its the people who know, from an early age, they must work hard in order to achieve their goals that are the most successful of all.

    In fact, I remember a study that was published recently involved kids that are continually told they're, "gifted," verses the ones that are praised for their hard work.

    You guessed it; the kids that were told they were gifted tended to underacheive while those that were encouraged to work hard learned their hard work would pay off in the end.

    Even the smartest students also have self-doubt. You are in good company.
     
  5. QofQuimica

    QofQuimica Seriously, dude, I think you're overreacting....
    Administrator Physician PhD Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved

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    Sometimes, the problem is not that you aren't trying hard enough--it's that you're continuing to stubbornly do the old things that aren't working and expecting that somehow they will work this time. Successful people do not fail any less often than people who are not successful, but successful people do keep trying to get the job done and come at the problem again from another angle. If you're finding that you are not doing well in a class, or on the MCAT, or whatever, the solution is to stop, think about what you're doing wrong, and try something else until you find a method that works. Assuming you are of normal or better intelligence, you are intellectually capable of becoming a physician. You do not have to be a genius to get through college or medical school, but you do have to be willing to work hard.

    Here's my personal example: My first semester of college didn't get off to a great start. Halfway through, I failed both my linear algebra and physics midterms. The physics prof was this sexist old guy from Eastern Europe who told me that maybe I just didn't have the aptitude for physics. After that, I started changing how I studied for those classes and getting tutored when I needed help. In the end, I passed them both. The next semester, I did very well in physics II, and I was the top student in my calc II class. The physics II prof even tried to convince me to take one of his advanced physics courses. Did I get any smarter over the course of one semester? No. I figured out what I had to do to learn the material and do well in these classes, and I didn't give up after the initial setbacks. And you know, once I started doing well, it didn't even matter any more that I had flunked those two midterms my first semester. :)
     
  6. spicedmanna

    Moderator Emeritus

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    Very eloquently stated, Q. :thumbup:

    I'm often impressed by your wisdom and insight. Good luck with boards.
     
  7. Empi

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    Q of Q is also one of my favorite people here; I get a lot from her posts.
     
  8. teddybear

    teddybear "Teddy"

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    Stop doubting yourself. Remind yourself of what it is you really want in life.
    I have not a scintilla of doubt in my mind that I will reach my goals. I just know it will happen. You should be the same way.
     

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