Are my publications valid?

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WanderingGuitarist

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Hey guys, so prior to submitting my research papers, I looked for a journal to see if its pubmed indexed on this site: List of All Journals Cited in PubMed

I looked at the .txt file that was on the site and picked a journal from it.

Today, I looked to see if my papers are on pubmed and I found out that the journal is not medline indexed ( thus wont be showing up on pubmed I believe)

Did I royally screw up and make it so that my publications are not useful for ERAS/residency?
 

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mistafab

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A pub is a pub, indexed or not.

It will be good for residency programs as long as it isn’t a predatory journal.
 
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Cawolf

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Journal name would be a better way to try to answer this question. As a novice researcher the investigators I have worked with would only submit to indexed journals.
 

AlteredScale

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Hey guys, so prior to submitting my research papers, I looked for a journal to see if its pubmed indexed on this site: List of All Journals Cited in PubMed

I looked at the .txt file that was on the site and picked a journal from it.

Today, I looked to see if my papers are on pubmed and I found out that the journal is not medline indexed ( thus wont be showing up on pubmed I believe)

Did I royally screw up and make it so that my publications are not useful for ERAS/residency?

There's not overarching answer to this. Your application is going to be at the table of a wide variety of PDs APDs and faculty members, some may make note of the fact that it isn't pubmed indexed and ask you perhaps, others may skip over it, it depends largely on the faculty and also the specialty you are hoping to apply to.

At the end of the day it's not a big deal so as long as the rest of your app is order.
 

Goro

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Hey guys, so prior to submitting my research papers, I looked for a journal to see if its pubmed indexed on this site: List of All Journals Cited in PubMed

I looked at the .txt file that was on the site and picked a journal from it.

Today, I looked to see if my papers are on pubmed and I found out that the journal is not medline indexed ( thus wont be showing up on pubmed I believe)

Did I royally screw up and make it so that my publications are not useful for ERAS/residency?
Ask your school's librarians if this is a predatory journal.

Sometimes brand new, valid journals take time to get onto the Pubmed list
 
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Dr G Oogle

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Did you have to pay for publication? If yes and not on pubmed than it is a predatory journal. If peer reviewed but not on pubmed and considered a Low level journal.

I do not think a pub is a pub. We had a fellow applicant who had 7 pubs but all were in open source journals, even though were on pubmed and I’d much rather someone have 1 publication in a legit peer reviewed journal. Unless You chose the open source option after your journal has already been peer reviewed (many established journals offer this) the peer review process for even pubmed indexed open source journals is suspect at best since there is a clear conflict of interest between accepting a paper and getting payment for its acceptance.

the answer to your question is if you are applying for a competive specialty for which research is more or less mandatory than you might have screwed yourself, if the you are not applying to such a specialty than at worst you’ll be judged on your non-research characteristics.
 
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FistLength

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There are certainly gradations in the quality of publications, but for the most part people interviewing have to wade through so many applications most won't scrutinize where something was published, especially for medical students. I would almost guarantee an attending will not search if something is pubmed indexed or not. The only exception I can think of is if the journal is truly heinous, like acta fakery international.

They will look at your research activity, see a couple of lines with your name on it, and move on. During the actual interview they might bring something up asking specifically about projects, but not to discredit them. Attendings know the game.
 
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pbrocks15

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Did you have to pay for publication? If yes and not on pubmed than it is a predatory journal. If peer reviewed but not on pubmed and considered a Low level journal.

I do not think a pub is a pub. We had a fellow applicant who had 7 pubs but all were in open source journals, even though were on pubmed and I’d much rather someone have 1 publication in a legit peer reviewed journal. Unless You chose the open source option after your journal has already been peer reviewed (many established journals offer this) the peer review process for even pubmed indexed open source journals is suspect at best since there is a clear conflict of interest between accepting a paper and getting payment for its acceptance.

the answer to your question is if you are applying for a competive specialty for which research is more or less mandatory than you might have screwed yourself, if the you are not applying to such a specialty than at worst you’ll be judged on your non-research characteristics.

How is it that he screws himself over for a competitive specality by this?
 

Dr G Oogle

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Because a attendings in specialty that really cares about research will be able to easily determine if a journal is indexed or not . Having a publication in a non-indexed journal won’t hurt you it just won’t help you much. It’s better than nothing just not much better, will essentially count as research experience + abstract or something of that level.
 

DameJulie

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I asked ONE PD about this, and he said if it’s a pub it’s a pub, indexed or not. Obviously if the pub is in his field (e.g General Surgery), then he’ll see if the journal is index or not, or if he’s familiar with the journal. For journals outside his field, he doesn’t have the knowledge/time to figure out whether it’s indexed or not.
 

OnePunchBiopsy

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Many good points here.

If using “medical student” as a frame of reference, getting published is all that really matters. It’s an extra line on your CV that can’t really hurt you. Yes, while people in select specialties may be able to discern if your research in that field is high impact, as a medical student, simply being in such a publication is good. Where research is published is not going to be a penalty, simply because many medical students don’t have research to begin with.

OP, I wouldn’t sweat the lack of Pubmed indexing. It’s a good lesson for research endeavors during your residency, but at this point in your career it doesn’t really matter. It will matter later when you apply for a job, and much later if you apply for a full professorship.
 
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