Feb 20, 2019
20
5
Status
Pre-Medical
Hello,

I'm a high school junior who's looking at undergrad programs. I've done some research on the BSMD programs of UCF, USF, and FAU. However, I took my SAT recently and received a 1370 after not practicing much. For these programs, you need close to a 1500. So, I'd need to start practicing studying to receive that score. Does anyone have any experiences with these programs or schools? I'd like to know if it's worth the effort to improve my SAT score to apply to these BSMD programs.
 

PapaGuava

The Real PG
Moderator
Gold Donor
7+ Year Member
May 10, 2012
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The only concern people will pass along with BS/MD or BS/DO programs is that you are locked in and you better hope it is what you really want in the end. I'm sure you wish to pursue medicine, but this is just something to consider if you were given an acceptance to such a program. However, if you are ready to go and receive an acceptance at any of those institutions for a BS/MD it would be a great opportunity. @EagerYoungPremed
 

yourFutureDoktur

2+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2016
138
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You also have to keep in mind the requirements for BS/MD programs. For certain schools, one of the requirements is to score an mcat above a certain number like 515, to be considered or else you get kicked out of the program and apply normally.
 

Icositetrachoron

BS/MD
2+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2015
21
3
As everyone else has said, it depends on the requirements of the program - if they maintain a specific MCAT or GPA score, you should ask yourself whether or not you think you're capable of doing such. My own experience with BS/MD has been pretty good, though it had tradeoffs - I got the ability to really explore academic options, take fun classes, and overall have a less traditional, stressful pre-med. That being said, I had to turn away an honors degree at my ideal university in order to pursue my program.

This all being said, I know plenty of the people in my program that couldn't meet the academic requirements during college and were dropped. I also know plenty of people who have struggled through their undergrad. If you're a person that doesn't have strong academic skills and quality work ethic, I don't know if healthcare in general is a path that you'd want to take - it only gets harder from here.