Does having a parent that is a doctor help?

  • At least one of my parents is a doctor, and i feel it has given me an advantage

    Votes: 90 14.9%
  • At least one of my parents is a doctor, and i feel it has not given me an advantage

    Votes: 55 9.1%
  • Both my parents are not doctors, but I think i would have an advantage if they were

    Votes: 267 44.2%
  • My parents are both not doctors, and i dont think i would have an advantage if they were

    Votes: 192 31.8%

  • Total voters
    604

Topper Harley

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just wondering.. How many of you have parents that are doctors?,
and if so...
Do you feel it has helped you in: undergrad, applying to medical school, or mcats?
 

45408

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"My parents are both not doctors"? How about "Neither of my parents are doctors....."?

:D
 

doctoruh

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My parents are not doctors so i am the first generation of my family to go to medical school, provided the CAT dont scratch me.
 

NRAI2001

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Both of my parents are doctors, and i don't think that they re any extra advantages to this. The only advantage i may see is that they push me a bit harder to go into the field, but i don't have any special hook ups or anything like that (especially since they are both FMG's).
 

musiclink213

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neither one of my parents are doctors. college is a relatively new thing for my family all together. i couldn't even fill up one hand with the number of people in my family who went to college. although i don't think i'd have an advantage even if they were docs.
 

stoleyerscrubz

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neither of my parents aren't not doctors never.
 

xdopaminex

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stoleyerscrubz said:
neither of my parents aren't not doctors never.
LOL...same here. My father is a physics and chemistry professor though, and I think this is useful in that he can always answer my stupid questions. And my mom cooks very well-this helps me stay focused for the MCAT :)
 

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Amorphisgirl

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xdopaminex said:
LOL...same here. My father is a physics and chemistry professor though, and I think this is useful in that he can always answer my stupid questions. And my mom cooks very well-this helps me stay focused for the MCAT :)
Hey xdopaminex! My Dad's a PHD physicist...AND a p-lawyer. Physicists are strange birds, no? (I much prefer the chem crazies, myself)...
 

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I don't think if my parents were doctors I would have had an easier time getting in (I mean it is not a selection factor). But, I do think the children of physicians have an inside view of the process, which helps.
 

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My dad's a doctor and I think it's definitely an advantage with respect to life in general, but specifically to the admissions process, I don't think it's much more helpful than somebody who's parents are lawyers or businessmen, etc. I think having a physician in the family will be of as much use as you make of it. I definitely gained a lot of clinical experience at my dad's hospital, but I also worked independently at other local and international hospitals. I think I also have a better feel for what the profession is like, at least from a personal standpoint, than someone who does not have a doc in the fam. These things could work for me in admissions, but who knows, the committee works in mysterious ways ;) I recently interviewed for a job at a doc's office - he told me he knew somebody on the admissions board at a med school and called to get her in. Then again, I also met a cab driver who knew the dean of admissions at the school she was driving me to, so I think it's more about who your parents know rather than what they do for a living if your acceptance is a matter of poltiics.
 

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My mom is a doctor, but it hasn't helped me significantly (in terms of gaining admission) in this process. But it has helped me personally. It's nice to have someone like her to talk to and seek advice from. She understands that it is indeed a very difficult process and profession, and she admires my determination nonetheless. She never pressured me to go into medicine, rather I found it was the best career choice on my own.

The rest of my family ...well, that's another story. My mom's sister and many of her cousins are physicians. Throughout this process, they have each voiced their rather strong opinions on each school I applied to, each school I interviewed at, and each school I gained admission at. What's funny is that their opinions vary widely. That gets annoying.
 

FungManX

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Well doing a statistical analysis of the poll it DOES seem that there is an effect of having at least one parent as a doctor.

compare the ratio of pre-meds with doctor parents with the ones that don't have doctor parents.

Pretty neat
 

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Neither of my parents are doctors. Also, I am the first in my family to go to college. My dad is a truck driver and my mom is a receptionist.

However, when I breathed a word of my desires to be a physician to my mom in hs...
My grandmother has been repeating, "I want a D-R in front of your name" in a kind of threatening mantra.

My grandma is 4'6" (I am not much taller) but I wouldn't screw with her. :laugh:
 

maia

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Ambs said:
My mom is a doctor, but it hasn't helped me significantly (in terms of gaining admission) in this process. But it has helped me personally. It's nice to have someone like her to talk to and seek advice from. She understands that it is indeed a very difficult process and profession, and she admires my determination nonetheless. She never pressured me to go into medicine, rather I found it was the best career choice on my own.

The rest of my family ...well, that's another story. My mom's sister and many of her cousins are physicians. Throughout this process, they have each voiced their rather strong opinions on each school I applied to, each school I interviewed at, and each school I gained admission at. What's funny is that their opinions vary widely. That gets annoying.
;) nice to know someone's the same. many of my mom's female cousins are docs too. my dad's younger and only sister followed my mom into medicine. weird thing is, there was never any pressure to go into medicine. :laugh:
it's an advantage when they share their experiences. it's a disadvantage, when other people to expect a lot of you more than your peers and they think you're just another "good, obedient little daughter" who can't decide for herself :smuggrin: . funny thing is, mom and aunts also have quite strong opinions that are both good and bad, but they're also very respectful about independent decision-making and try to lessen influence. :love:
 

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neither of my parents are doctors and I will be the first person on my family tree to have a college degree, much less a doctor. Had a great grampa who was a lawer but he never attended law school (still trying to figure that one out). I don't think my family even believes that I will apply to medical school. I have a 3.8 undergrad and am working my butt off to get my pre-reqs and extra-cirr stuff done and when I talk to them about it they are just like "well that's good son, I'm glad your doing good in school, just remember what a college degree can do for you even if you decide not to be a doctor." I must say it is the best motivation I could hope for. I'm the type of person that WILL do what others believe I can't do. Also, having no one to refer to with questions has really improved my research skills. If I need to know something I have to find it for myself.
 

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JimmyMallo said:
neither of my parents are doctors and I will be the first person on my family tree to have a college degree, much less a doctor. Had a great grampa who was a lawer but he never attended law school (still trying to figure that one out). I don't think my family even believes that I will apply to medical school. I have a 3.8 undergrad and am working my butt off to get my pre-reqs and extra-cirr stuff done and when I talk to them about it they are just like "well that's good son, I'm glad your doing good in school, just remember what a college degree can do for you even if you decide not to be a doctor." I must say it is the best motivation I could hope for. I'm the type of person that WILL do what others believe I can't do. Also, having no one to refer to with questions has really improved my research skills. If I need to know something I have to find it for myself.
Good luck :thumbup:
 

FMGP8P

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Some of you may not see any obvious advantage of having a parent that is a physician. However, it is important to consider the less noticeable benefits that educated parents, especially physicians, provide.

Children raised by physicians will speak, think, and behave more like physicians than children raised by uneducated parents. This has obvious benefits in the classroom as our school system favors students of higher social class such as that of a physician. Our school system rewards children of physicians more than those of uneducated parents because these children conform to the standards that our school system expects. In addition, children of physicians are more likely to recognize teaching styles that our schools employ.

An additional benefit of being a child of a physician is networking skills. Students of educated parents better understand networking which leads to superior letters of recommendations and a wider selection of ECs.

And last but not least, a student whose parents are physicians is more likely to articulate his/her words, organize their speech, and possess a demeanor similar to other physicians. This has an advantage during the interview as the interviewers will most likely find that behavior appealing.
 

antissa

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One of my parents is a doctor, and I don't think it's given me any advantage in terms of admissions.
On the contrary, he won't quit telling me how terrible the exams are, how much pressure there is, how little sleep I'll get during residency...
He does know a lot of docs but my skin's not thick enough to ask them for favors. Med schools was so long ago that he can't remember the basic science stuff in any detail as to be helpful to me :rolleyes:
 

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njbmd

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Hi there,
Both of my parents are physicians. I come from a family that has ten physicians. I started out with a Ph.D because I didn't want to be a physician but here I am, a PGY-3 General surgery resident, in the family business. Having a family full of physicians was a great help. It opened many doors for me but I had to have the goods to step throught them.
nbjmd :)
 

docjolly

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FMGP8P said:
Some of you may not see any obvious advantage of having a parent that is a physician. However, it is important to consider the less noticeable benefits that educated parents, especially physicians, provide.

Children raised by physicians will speak, think, and behave more like physicians than children raised by uneducated parents. This has obvious benefits in the classroom as our school system favors students of higher social class such as that of a physician. Our school system rewards children of physicians more than those of uneducated parents because these children conform to the standards that our school system expects. In addition, children of physicians are more likely to recognize teaching styles that our schools employ.

An additional benefit of being a child of a physician is networking skills. Students of educated parents better understand networking which leads to superior letters of recommendations and a wider selection of ECs.

And last but not least, a student whose parents are physicians is more likely to articulate his/her words, organize their speech, and possess a demeanor similar to other physicians. This has an advantage during the interview as the interviewers will most likely find that behavior appealing.
:rolleyes:

:laugh: :laugh: You've got to be kidding me? :laugh: :laugh:

I won't even bother to respond extensively to the nonsense spouted in this post. However, know that these gross overstatements are both ignorant and invalid.
 

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ltrain said:
Neither of my parents is a doctor.

But my mom is a teacher and she corrects my grammar ;)
:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
 

Psycho Doctor

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Both of my parents are lawyers and my brother is in law school; I guess I broke the mold.
 

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FMGP8P said:
Some of you may not see any obvious advantage of having a parent that is a physician. However, it is important to consider the less noticeable benefits that educated parents, especially physicians, provide.

Children raised by physicians will speak, think, and behave more like physicians than children raised by uneducated parents. This has obvious benefits in the classroom as our school system favors students of higher social class such as that of a physician. Our school system rewards children of physicians more than those of uneducated parents because these children conform to the standards that our school system expects. In addition, children of physicians are more likely to recognize teaching styles that our schools employ.

An additional benefit of being a child of a physician is networking skills. Students of educated parents better understand networking which leads to superior letters of recommendations and a wider selection of ECs.

And last but not least, a student whose parents are physicians is more likely to articulate his/her words, organize their speech, and possess a demeanor similar to other physicians. This has an advantage during the interview as the interviewers will most likely find that behavior appealing.

I don't think this is true in it's entirety, but certainly the children of physicians have some advantages over the rest of us. Just survey your fellow premeds to get an idea of how many premeds are the children of physicians. I can honestly say that there is not a single person I know that is a premed here who does not have at least one parent who is a physician. It's almost assumed that your parent is a doctor of some kind; conversations I've had with my fellow premeds have often included the question: "so what type of medicine do your parents practice?" I think it's funny to tell them that my mom is an "airport radiologist"--she's one of those people in the white uniforms at the airport that x-ray your baggage :)

I'd say that in general, most premeds are the children of physicians and that the premeds at ivy league schools are almost exclusively the children of doctors. This makes sense, as physicians (mostly) are (1) financially capable of sending their children to the most expensive private schools, and, (2) they are aware of the value of higher education.

I think that medicine is a hard field for the masses to break into. For one thing, the competition is fierce, and the children of physicians (and other highly educated professionals) will always have an educational advantage over the rest of us. For example, one surgeon,who I do research with, tutors her colleague's high-school kids in biology and physics (for $200/hr!). I never had a vascular surgeon come to my house to tutor me when I was in 10th grade, nor do many other children of uneducated parents. This better education, at an early age, coupled with more emphasis on education in general (and the expectation of a college education), gives the children of physicians and highly educated professionals an edge throughout college and into the application cycle.

Additionally, the children of doctors have the added benefits of (1) Shadowing their parents for 18-26 years, (2) having the opportunity to work and/or volunteer at their parents' hospital or clinic as often as necessary, at their convenience, (3) having access to their parents' high-ranked colleagues who can write impressive letters of recommendation; that letter from the Chief of Surgery at Cornell, might just help you get into their medschool (you never know)!

Neither of my parents finished high school, let alone college. Nobody in my family has ever gone to college. My dad still spells college with a silent "d."
Nevertheless, I don't think that makes me any better or worse applicant to medschool than my fellow premeds with their all-star educations and exposure to medicine at an early age. I'm sure that when I am a doctor someday, I will make the education of my children paramount, so I don't begrudge those who can do it now.

I remember when I was in high school, I knew someone (the son of a physician) who would shadow his father all around the world to conferences related to his dad's surgical specialty (evidently the man was an all-star in the field). He'd go to conferences in Vienna, London, etc. and see his dad give presentations about advances in his specialty and listen to lectures about advancements in the field. Shadowing my dad, at the other end of the spectrum, consisted of goint to a nightclub, getting drunk, smoking, then getting into a fight with the owner over money. I don't "blame" my parents for my lousy performance in highschool, but I do believe that the atomosphere that one is raised in does influence their dreams and ambitions. I can honestly say that I never dreamed of being a doctor. At that point in my life, such a dream would have seemed ridiculous to me, as I didn't even believe I was going to go to college, let alone go into medicine, which I knew nothing about.

Needless to say, my friend graduated in the top of my class; I graduated (barely) in the bottom. Many people think that we're all the same, and that the geniuses rise to the top while the chaff gets left at the bottom. I don't think that's the case at all, many many children get left behind. I would have been left behind myself if it hadn't been for standardized testing. It was the SAT which allowed me--with practically no education, barely passing grades, no famous surgeon parent, etc--get into a top college.

Some of you might say that this is just an example of "class warfare," or that those of us who really want it bad enough will overcome any obstacles that stand in our way and still be successful. The sad truth is that that more often than not, the genius daughter of a violent alcoholic ends up working at McDonalds, not on a full scholarship to Havard. That's just what happens. Those of us who do climb out of the lower-classes do it mostly by sheer luck--if I hadn't been able to afford to take the SAT or had just decided that I would fail it like everything else I had done; if a good college hadn't accepted me just to simply raise their average SAT scores for their USNEWS ranking; or if I had accepted that I could never *climb* out becuse nobody else had done it before in my family, I'd be working in fast food or retail right now instead of on the road to a career in medicine.

Look at the percentage of the children who are the offspring of doctors who go to college in the first place--it's hovering, I believe, near 95% or so. Look at the percentage of children who are the offspring of high school dropouts--far, far less; it is somewhere in the range of 10%. The real advantage that the children of doctors have is not in the way they speak, or their backdoor connections--it's that they have a shot in the first place, while so many of the rest of us do not. It's that simple.

*Note: The same advantage applies to the children of all highly educated professionals. This includes, but is not limited to, physicians, lawyers, college professors, teachers, researchers, CEOs, CFOs, accountants, politicians, et. al.
 

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There are certainly "connections" with growing up with physicians. Also you get to know t hand what a doctor's life is like. Whereas it's not mutually exclusive those who have MD parents often are brought up in an intellectual environment which is helpful. You often also have more that money can offer in environment and priviledges which can be an asset towards college and med school.
 

fotolilith

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Statistically speaking, one survey conducted 10 years ago shows that doctor's kids have about a 5-10% increased chance of being accepted to medical school. Then again, this is ONLY correlation, and philosophy majors have about the same chance (thus, there are no valid conclusions you can make from such an observation).

On the other hand, around the same time 60% of physicians answered "no" on a survey about whether they would encourage their children to go into medicine. Additionally, an admissions dean recently told me that doc kids have a higher drop out rate from medical school.

So it's a mixed bag to be a physician's kid. On the one hand, you get an inside view of the field, but on the other hand, what our parents' generation dealt with in terms of the medical field is quite different from what our generation faces.

Or, as one physician dad like to tell his med school bound daughter: "It ain't like it used to be,...and it never really was."
 

dopaminophile

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Great post Crake...

I find it interesting that the ratio of opinions for the advantage/not advantage question is almost identical for medical legacies and non legacies. I would have thought that medical legacies would think that it's not advantagous and non-legacies would that that it's completely advantagous.

....interesting....
 

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FMGP8P said:
Some of you may not see any obvious advantage of having a parent that is a physician. However, it is important to consider the less noticeable benefits that educated parents, especially physicians, provide.

Children raised by physicians will speak, think, and behave more like physicians than children raised by uneducated parents. This has obvious benefits in the classroom as our school system favors students of higher social class such as that of a physician. Our school system rewards children of physicians more than those of uneducated parents because these children conform to the standards that our school system expects. In addition, children of physicians are more likely to recognize teaching styles that our schools employ.

An additional benefit of being a child of a physician is networking skills. Students of educated parents better understand networking which leads to superior letters of recommendations and a wider selection of ECs.

And last but not least, a student whose parents are physicians is more likely to articulate his/her words, organize their speech, and possess a demeanor similar to other physicians. This has an advantage during the interview as the interviewers will most likely find that behavior appealing.
I have to disagree with you. I am the first in my family to go to college and yes, I do believe that children of physicians have an advantage because of who they know, but I do not believe that children of physicians have any other advantage. I maybe speaking from personal experience, but I know children of physicians who can't put sentences together and who's daddy paid the school to get them back in after academic probation. In high school I was on debate and public speaking and I haven't seen anyone yet who can out talk me :)

I don't think you meant to be demeaning in your statement, but I have to say your words seem quite arrogant. Parents do not need to be educated to shape thier children into well-rounded, educated adults. Sometimes, life happens and you have to react even if it wasn't your initial plan. I don't believe that having parents that didn't go to college put me at a disadvantage compared to other students. In fact I beleive that everything I've been through and everything my parent's have been through has put me at an advantage because I know what its like to be on the other side!
 

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fotolilith said:
Statistically speaking, one survey conducted 10 years ago shows that doctor's kids have about a 5-10% increased chance of being accepted to medical school. Then again, this is ONLY correlation, and philosophy majors have about the same chance (thus, there are no valid conclusions you can make from such an observation).

On the other hand, around the same time 60% of physicians answered "no" on a survey about whether they would encourage their children to go into medicine. Additionally, an admissions dean recently told me that doc kids have a higher drop out rate from medical school.

So it's a mixed bag to be a physician's kid. On the one hand, you get an inside view of the field, but on the other hand, what our parents' generation dealt with in terms of the medical field is quite different from what our generation faces.

Or, as one physician dad like to tell his med school bound daughter: "It ain't like it used to be,...and it never really was."
Great post! There are definite disadvantages to having physician parents. Growing up, you don't care about the prestige since you don't view your Dad as "the brilliant surgeon" but as the guy who's always late for everything or the guy that crashes on the couch as soon as he gets home. You also see first hand how doctors gripe over the profession with their colleagues during social events. I often asked myself "Why the hell would anyone want to do this?" as a high school kid - something that most others don't ask themselves until their intern year. When I attended a public school as a kid I was one of the better off kids, but later on at private school I was amazed at the obscene wealth of some of my classmates whose parents were in business - again, we learned early on not to go into it just for the money (of course, nobody on SDN fits that category!) :rolleyes:

Having physician parents won't help you on the MCAT, USMLE or on the wards when you're up all night. You're aware of the lifestyle fields of dermatology etc before you even apply to med school. Just ask any of the current residents who never had physician parents if they think they can really help out their kids in the future with med school. A lot of them will actively discourage them from even considering it (of those who will actually spend enough time with their kids to be a factor in their lives). This is not limited to doctors, though. Every profession has its negatives that only family members can see. I think that people who cry the loudest over doctors' kids having this huge advantage are just displacing their frustration.
 

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Docjolly, could you please explain why you disagree with my comments.

Americanangel
Certainly, my comments cannot be arrogant as I am a first generation college student myself.
I am sure that you are a great speaker and probably better than many students whose parents are physicians. Nevertheless, cultural capital (which includes linguistics) has been shown to play a role in education and social reproduction. In particular, the socio-linguist, Basil Bernstein, is very popular for his research on the differentiation of language between social classes.
Although cultural capital seems to afford advantages to certain groups, I agree with you that knowing “what its like to be on the other side” can be an advantage for doctors, especially since they need to relate to a wide range of patients.
 

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My mom was a doctor in our home country, but since moving to America a few years ago, she's been working as a nurse. I don't feel that I have any advantage over others, because I don't have *connections* like maybe some others with parents as doctors have. In fact, it's an emotional burden, having to see my mom working as a nurse, and knowing how some doctors out there look down on nurses. :(
 

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americanangel said:
I have to disagree with you. I am the first in my family to go to college and yes, I do believe that children of physicians have an advantage because of who they know, but I do not believe that children of physicians have any other advantage. I maybe speaking from personal experience, but I know children of physicians who can't put sentences together and who's daddy paid the school to get them back in after academic probation. In high school I was on debate and public speaking and I haven't seen anyone yet who can out talk me :)
you want to see the children of physicians who paid for their kids to go to school, just take a drop by my university. so many people have parents who are docs, mostly plastic surgeons and dermatologists and anaesthesiology (sp? i'm not going into that field since i can't even spell it). they walk around with their gucci and prada bags, not giving a crap about their classes because daddy will just support them forever. of course, this is not just limited to physicians, there are also rich stockbrokers and deans of the different schools in the school. these people are some of the most innarticulate people i've ever seen in my life (think of paris hilton and nicole richie in the simple life cloned 5000 times).

you get both sides of the spectrum though. there are children of rich successful people who are very bright and articulate and know better than to wear those polar bear boots.
 

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musiclink213 said:
you want to see the children of physicians who paid for their kids to go to school, just take a drop by my university. so many people have parents who are docs, mostly plastic surgeons and dermatologists and anaesthesiology (sp? i'm not going into that field since i can't even spell it). they walk around with their gucci and prada bags, not giving a crap about their classes because daddy will just support them forever. of course, this is not just limited to physicians, there are also rich stockbrokers and deans of the different schools in the school. these people are some of the most innarticulate people i've ever seen in my life

:laugh: This is what I experienced at Columbia. Hmm...do you go there? :laugh:
 

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My parents arent docs, but I feel like it would help me, as I feel like I am always asked at interviews what my parents do, and if they're in the medical field at all...
 

LauraMac

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haven't read the whole thread, but...

my parents are not docs, and i think it would be advantageous if they were, because i would have grown up hearing about random medical stuff. i've learned a little about construction and a little about accounting, but nothing about medicine from my parents.

it would also be nice to see what their everyday lives are like rather than just seeing a little of that from shadowing experiences.

i also think having parents who are doctors would give you better connections for research, shadowing, etc.
 

NEATOMD

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My dad is a doctor. I don't think that it helped me get into medical school, though. I do think it influenced my drive to become a doctor though. Because of my dad, I was able to see a different aspect of medicine, aside from the glorified tv version. Still, I fell in love with medicine from having helped him on medical mission trips and from seeing what goes on in medicine by helping around his office, like filing paper work. As far as my parents pushing me into medicine or me doing it for the wrong reasons...oddly enough, my parents have made it clear that they would rather I not become an MD. Now, knowing that I have chosen to become an MD despite their warnings, they do encourage me. I guess it is possible that the adcom might have felt that I knew what I was getting myself into more than other less medically experienced candidate and that I was in it for the right reasons. Still, one could gain an equal appreciation from having done as much volunteer work as I've done...so in the end, I don't think it really made a difference.

As far as using my parents for connections: while they do want me to succeed, they want me to make my own path, to earn things for myself. So, even though they do have some connections, I haven't used them and I have to make my own. Nonetheless, I think everything has worked out pretty well, things mean alot more when you have to work for them.
 

americanangel

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FMGP8P said:
Americanangel
Certainly, my comments cannot be arrogant as I am a first generation college student myself.
I am sure that you are a great speaker and probably better than many students whose parents are physicians. Nevertheless, cultural capital (which includes linguistics) has been shown to play a role in education and social reproduction. In particular, the socio-linguist, Basil Bernstein, is very popular for his research on the differentiation of language between social classes.
Although cultural capital seems to afford advantages to certain groups, I agree with you that knowing “what its like to be on the other side” can be an advantage for doctors, especially since they need to relate to a wide range of patients.
I definately understand what you are saying about society...and yes, capital culture does portray that stereotype. But just because that stereotype exists doesn't mean that we have to passively accept it.


Oh yeah, musiclink213....I definatly agree with you! I know kids even at my school driving around in brand new BMW, Cadillacs, and Mercedes. Its not just doctors kids!
 

lakersfan

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My dad is a dentist and I don't really consider that to be a Dr. (even though you refer to a dentist as Dr. XXXXX ). My dad has always pushed me away from dentistry even though I was interested in it. Even during this process of applying to med schools, I considered becoming a dentist just due to the general frustration of dealing with being rejected by so many schools and the intense competition. But all is well now...I will get to be a Dr. and I'm very very very happy. :D :D :D


Edit: My uncle is a physician and he really wanted me to be a Dr. I think he was almost as happy as I was when he found out that I finally got into med school.
 

Crake

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Ha, DocJolly, I was talking about Columbia in my post, how ironic. Everybody here has a parent who chief of surgery somewhere.

neatomd said:
Still, I fell in love with medicine from having helped him on medical mission trips
Yeah, adcoms hate applicants who have traveled the world on medical missions; they tend to frown upon MSF volunteers. That won't help you at all in an interview, or give you an edge getting in.

You know what I did during high school?

I was a clerk at a grocery store.

Now that's pretty impressive. I'm sure my interviewers are going to flip over it.
 

Reimat

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NEATOMD said:
Because of my dad, I was able to see a different aspect of medicine, aside from the glorified tv version. Still, I fell in love with medicine from having helped him on medical mission trips and from seeing what goes on in medicine by helping around his office, like filing paper work.
I think having the chance to go on such medical mission trips and to just go into the office to help him are exactly the sorts of opportunities that count as advantages for the children of doctors. I don't feel like it's a huge advantage, but it's certainly harder for children of non-doctors to get involved in those activities.
 

fun8stuff

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doctoruh said:
My parents are not doctors so i am the first generation of my family to go to medical school, provided the CAT dont scratch me.
yeah, i am the first person in my family to attend college.