Dec 18, 2014
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I'm sorry if these have been asked before, but I couldn't find recent answers to some questions and their websites are pretty sparse.

Do CCOM and AZCOM still do weekly testing?

CCOM is using the symptoms-presentation approach now, is AZCOM using the same method? What is the symptoms-presentation approach and how does it differ from the previous style?

Are there any significant differences in the curriculum between AZCOM and CCOM?

I know about the Multidisciplinary Clinic, but are there other on-campus opportunities for clinical or research?

Thanks
 

Henry101

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Jul 15, 2014
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I think these are important questions given how poor Midwestern's website is at giving information.
I am also curious about these two schools. I don't know if I want to send these schools my primary app given their really high tuition.
If anyone can comment about these two schools, I'd really appreciate it.
 
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maybdoc

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Feb 21, 2011
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There are several current students who post in the school specific threads for CCOM and AZCOM. You could post there and/or pm them.
 
Oct 27, 2013
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AZCOM runs on the quarter system, and you get an exam every week, its pretty intense and keeps you on your toes, other schools give you examinations in blocks.
 

hbslax4

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AZCOM runs on the quarter system, and you get an exam every week, its pretty intense and keeps you on your toes, other schools give you examinations in blocks.
I go to a school that has similar testing habits. A test about every 10 days (occasionally every week or 2 weeks). Personally I really enjoy this. It prevents you from having to be tested on 6 weeks worth of material. But like Seth Joo said, you have to stay on top of your material. After awhile you just get used to it. I would not let this scare you! I think it's a big plus.
 
Jan 22, 2015
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AZcom is mostly traditional lecture. If you're looking for any activities to reach out and help the significant population of underserved nearby expect to be told "you might see one in the clinic...maybe" or "in your future practice", which is pretty ridiculous. It's the gated community on the hillside.

Both schools offer good research but don't expect it to be about the nearby underserved.
did you get into azcom?
 

ananasmed

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First year at CCOM. I'm not sure exactly what "symptoms presentation approach" means (hah, freshman problems) but I assume it's referring to the style in which our curriculum is structured with a case of the week. The case of the week is mostly used in our patient symptom presentation/physical exam skills courses, which is basically "doctoring" class, and also in OMM, but our basic science classes may also try to tie in something about the case of the week depending on what we're covering. We also learn plenty of clinical correlates in the basic science lectures, which I'm sure is not unique to our curriculum, but definitely makes learning some topics easier and far less dry. As mentioned previously, we run on "quarters" (Fall - 14 weeks, Winter and Spring - 10 weeks each) and have very frequent exams and quizzes. There are absolutely opportunities for research on campus, but I think we are not allowed to start until winter quarter of first year, which is after Thanksgiving. As far as clinical opportunities, students can volunteer at several free clinics for underserved patient populations in Chicago. There is also an opportunity to volunteer at the new osteopathic soft tissue clinic on campus for a more limited number of students. If there's anything else that I can explain about the curriculum or CCOM in general, send me a PM!
 
Jan 22, 2015
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No, but I interviewed there and had an awful experience. If I had gotten in my opinion wouldn't have changed either.
yeah, i got really grilled by the azcom interview, but managed to get in. overall presentation isn't as full and enthusiastic like some other schools, but i've had us md interviews that were even more underwhelming.
 
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Jan 22, 2015
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First year at CCOM. I'm not sure exactly what "symptoms presentation approach" means (hah, freshman problems) but I assume it's referring to the style in which our curriculum is structured with a case of the week. The case of the week is mostly used in our patient symptom presentation/physical exam skills courses, which is basically "doctoring" class, and also in OMM, but our basic science classes may also try to tie in something about the case of the week depending on what we're covering. We also learn plenty of clinical correlates in the basic science lectures, which I'm sure is not unique to our curriculum, but definitely makes learning some topics easier and far less dry. As mentioned previously, we run on "quarters" (Fall - 14 weeks, Winter and Spring - 10 weeks each) and have very frequent exams and quizzes. There are absolutely opportunities for research on campus, but I think we are not allowed to start until winter quarter of first year, which is after Thanksgiving. As far as clinical opportunities, students can volunteer at several free clinics for underserved patient populations in Chicago. There is also an opportunity to volunteer at the new osteopathic soft tissue clinic on campus for a more limited number of students. If there's anything else that I can explain about the curriculum or CCOM in general, send me a PM!
do you know how the commute is around the area? i know there were early clinical exposure, but if the clinics are far away it may suck trying to manage time for it while also being a first year. this is excluding the home clinic that is on campus, although i assume there are some opportunities there as well?
 

ananasmed

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do you know how the commute is around the area? i know there were early clinical exposure, but if the clinics are far away it may suck trying to manage time for it while also being a first year. this is excluding the home clinic that is on campus, although i assume there are some opportunities there as well?
Traffic can be bad, especially heading in certain directions at specific times of the day. Our early clinicals I think are just once per quarter, starting in winter, and they are typically on Fridays. In first year, we don't have class on (most) Fridays to allow us to shadow, meet with professors, study, etc. :) I wouldn't sweat it too much since it won't be a daily inconvenience or anything.
 

readingrl

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Apr 16, 2012
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AZCOM runs on the quarter system as stated above. There are weekly tests, but I like it because it forces me to stay on top of all the material. There are only a couple of non basic science classes that have midterms and finals. Most classes have exams every other week to every 3 weeks, so they are staggered. Sometimes it does pile up to a couple of exams in one week, but I havent found it to be too difficult to manage.

I'm not sure where the person above got the idea that there is no opportunity to help the underserved in the area. The largest club on campus is HOME. It is a student run organization that runs clinics and education events in 3 homeless shelters around Phoenix. All of the specialty clubs also volunteer around Phoenix, though those tend to be more fundraising or at Project CURE. Feel free to PM me if you have specific questions about AZCOM.
 
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Oct 27, 2013
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I got it directly from the mouths of my interviewers who were insulting about it and said word for word what I said. They should have done a better job representing their institution, and inform themselves better if that's not the case.
There are a lot of positives about AZCOM, for one they do not require attendance to lectures, there are some schools where it is mandatory, some schools go as far as force students to used fingerprint scanners to check in for class. There are schools with dress codes as well. Also there are schools that have religious affiliations, and I have strong belief religion has no place in the academic environment, this goes double for institutions where sciences are taught.

The school has one of the highest board pass rates of any DO school, it is also a safe campus in a relatively quiet suburb of Phoenix. There are a lot of medical schools located in rather unsafe locations.
 

ortnakas

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There are a lot of positives about AZCOM, for one they do not require attendance to lectures, there are some schools where it is mandatory, some schools go as far as force students to used fingerprint scanners to check in for class.
Who uses fingerprint scanners?! (I know it's not LECOM).
 

DrMcCoyDO

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Second year at CCOM here. We have nearly weekly testing; generally there's at least one quiz a week. It definitely has helped encourage me to develop better study habits. As for the symptom based curriculum, it is primarily the clinical courses that follow this; however, there is a bit more integration in 2nd year.

Volunteer-wise, I don't personally get involved with our student-run clinic, but I know that many of my classmates who do and they seem to really like it. There are regularly other volunteer opportunities that come up, too.

When it comes to research, I did a decent amount of cold calling (well, cold emailing, really) to find my project, but we do have a research department that can assist you in finding research opportunities. Quite a few of my classmates and I were able to get involved in research this last summer.

Hope all that helps!
 
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Nov 18, 2016
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First year at CCOM. I'm not sure exactly what "symptoms presentation approach" means (hah, freshman problems) but I assume it's referring to the style in which our curriculum is structured with a case of the week. The case of the week is mostly used in our patient symptom presentation/physical exam skills courses, which is basically "doctoring" class, and also in OMM, but our basic science classes may also try to tie in something about the case of the week depending on what we're covering. We also learn plenty of clinical correlates in the basic science lectures, which I'm sure is not unique to our curriculum, but definitely makes learning some topics easier and far less dry. As mentioned previously, we run on "quarters" (Fall - 14 weeks, Winter and Spring - 10 weeks each) and have very frequent exams and quizzes. There are absolutely opportunities for research on campus, but I think we are not allowed to start until winter quarter of first year, which is after Thanksgiving. As far as clinical opportunities, students can volunteer at several free clinics for underserved patient populations in Chicago. There is also an opportunity to volunteer at the new osteopathic soft tissue clinic on campus for a more limited number of students. If there's anything else that I can explain about the curriculum or CCOM in general, send me a PM!
Hello!

Could you please share your interview experience? I know they use a panel system, but I'd like to have an idea of what kinds of questions they frequent. Mine is coming up and I'm very nervous! Thank you!