kkc620

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 10, 2006
39
0
0
Status
Medical Student
...for common problems seen on the wards, common workups, common calls, etc.

thanks.
 

NightVision

7+ Year Member
Jul 16, 2009
31
0
141
Status
1) Washington Manual Internship Survial Guide
-has a good section on common cross cover situations and what to do, i.e. how much aspart to give for a sugar of 300?
http://www.amazon.com/Washington-Manual-Internship-Survival-Second/dp/0781786452/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1270189741&sr=8-2

2) Medicine Current Clinical Strategies
-the only book I still carry w/ me as a hospitalist, small book, has a diagnosis, then all the admit orders, including medication options, what labs/tests to order, what to send off in each tube for an LP
-we all know to give Ativan for a seizure, but this tells you how much, other options, how to load Dilantin, etc
-basically it doesn't teach you anything but tells you what to do
http://www.amazon.com/Medicine-Current-Clinical-Strategies-Medical/dp/1934323160/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1270190011&sr=1-1-spell
 

futuremd22283

Titleist
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 30, 2005
97
1
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]

greenthing

10+ Year Member
Dec 10, 2008
9
1
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I know it's not quite as contained and thus manageable as a book, but Uptodate is actually really good for this. Obviously you don't need to read 95% of the articles, including those about detailed pathophys or obscure diseases. But you know at this point what those commonest diagnoses are, and generally Uptodate has one "basic principles" article about all of them that concisely summarizes clinical features, diagnostic testing, and treatment. If it's too long, just read the summary at the bottom. If you're interested in more detail, just click on the link on the left where there's probably a whole other article about the detail you're interested in. I hate the fact that it's proprietary, but I love UTD.
 

ResidentMD

7+ Year Member
Jul 8, 2009
1,065
8
151
Status
Do you people find Maxwells useful at all during intern year? Though its only $8, its seeming to me that the cost of all these 'pocket' books seems to pile up.
 

gutonc

No Meat, No Treat
Staff member
Administrator
10+ Year Member
Mar 6, 2005
17,993
10,787
481
Status
Attending Physician
Do you people find Maxwells useful at all during intern year? Though its only $8, its seeming to me that the cost of all these 'pocket' books seems to pile up.
Nope. Just buy Pocket Medicine and be done with it. Epocrates is free on any mobile device and you can steal a Sanford's (if you can read it) or just use your hospital's antibiogram for empiric abx choices (if they don't get better after 48h, call ID).
 

obiwan

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 26, 2006
686
46
261
Texas
Status
Attending Physician
Nope. Just buy Pocket Medicine and be done with it. Epocrates is free on any mobile device and you can steal a Sanford's (if you can read it) or just use your hospital's antibiogram for empiric abx choices (if they don't get better after 48h, call ID).
can't go wrong with that combination
 

jdh71

epiphany at nine thousand six hundred feet
10+ Year Member
Dec 14, 2006
67,491
45,746
281
FEMA Camp, USA
Status
Attending Physician
Nope. Just buy Pocket Medicine and be done with it. Epocrates is free on any mobile device and you can steal a Sanford's (if you can read it) or just use your hospital's antibiogram for empiric abx choices (if they don't get better after 48h, call ID).
Yup. Those are the basics, though, I carried a hard copy Pharmacopea (sp?). I hate it when batteries go out. I can always thumb through my little book.

Of course MOST of you will also buy a "pocket" Wash Manual inspite of what we say. You will get tired of lugging it around by September.
 

ResidentMD

7+ Year Member
Jul 8, 2009
1,065
8
151
Status
Yup. Those are the basics, though, I carried a hard copy Pharmacopea (sp?). I hate it when batteries go out. I can always thumb through my little book.

Of course MOST of you will also buy a "pocket" Wash Manual inspite of what we say. You will get tired of lugging it around by September.
I agree....IMHO, Tarascons is a better pharmacopea than Epocrates. Epocrates just has all that other fluff too, which makes it useful. I dont think it can replace Tarascons (the free Epocrates).

I am done with Wash Manual. I realized its futility during MS4, when it wouldnt give me the answers I wanted on the wards. Its too broad for the nitty-gritties, yet too less for the concepts. For understanding stuff in depth, I would rather look at Harrisons.
 

indiamacbean

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 16, 2003
373
5
0
Status
1.UCSF hospitalist handbook. Most of us start out with HH and pocket medicine and end up with only the green book. the advantage I have found is that it gives more concrete instruction though the redbook is also good.

2. postcall. http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.gotbourbon.com/makers.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.gotbourbon.com/makers.html&usg=__lvxSuQToOxZKBjC8wiNM35EvBL0=&h=714&w=349&sz=59&hl=en&start=14&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=4oTnxEuC7QWixM:&tbnh=140&tbnw=68&prev=/images?q=makers+mark&um=1&hl=en&client=safari&sa=N&rls=en&tbs=isch:1
 
  • Like
Reactions: gulmohr
Sep 6, 2009
103
1
0
Status
IMO (this issue has been stated numerous times, perhaps we need a survey): RED BOOK (amazing for BIG picture in a concise format) + Osler Medical Handbook/Washington manual (both give the BIG picture plus a taste of the pathophysiology in a prose format, and are very easy to read) + Medicine Current Clinical Strategies (doesn't tell you WHY it happened, just HOW to treat!).

Example:
Non-Systolic Heart Failure
Red Book- control HR and perform diuresis

Osler Medical Handbook/Washington manual- same as Red Book but gives principles behind rationale

Medicine Current Clinical Strategies- tells you what doses to start meds at
 

ResidentMD

7+ Year Member
Jul 8, 2009
1,065
8
151
Status
IMO (this issue has been stated numerous times, perhaps we need a survey): RED BOOK (amazing for BIG picture in a concise format) + Osler Medical Handbook/Washington manual (both give the BIG picture plus a taste of the pathophysiology in a prose format, and are very easy to read) + Medicine Current Clinical Strategies (doesn't tell you WHY it happened, just HOW to treat!).

Example:
Non-Systolic Heart Failure
Red Book- control HR and perform diuresis

Osler Medical Handbook/Washington manual- same as Red Book but gives principles behind rationale

Medicine Current Clinical Strategies- tells you what doses to start meds at
Can someone verify if this is the same as Medicine On Call for the IPhone? Its by the same company. I just want to NOT have any more weight in my pockets, which I know will be full with patient sheets, etc
 
Feb 2, 2010
245
1
0
Status
MD/PhD Student
Let's not forget the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine. It'll make you look brilliant, act brilliant (all pimp questions answered, I found), and cosmopolitan for considering other cultures. Though apparently there is an American edition available.
 
Feb 17, 2010
21
0
0
Status
I have the American Oxford edition- it is alright, and a hybrid of Pocket Medicine and WashU Manual.
 

jdh71

epiphany at nine thousand six hundred feet
10+ Year Member
Dec 14, 2006
67,491
45,746
281
FEMA Camp, USA
Status
Attending Physician
Let's not forget the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine. It'll make you look brilliant, act brilliant (all pimp questions answered, I found), and cosmopolitan for considering other cultures. Though apparently there is an American edition available.
I have the American Oxford edition- it is alright, and a hybrid of Pocket Medicine and WashU Manual.
If you get the oxford, get the english. Still pretty bulky IMHO.
 

Crazy Diamond

7+ Year Member
Oct 1, 2009
77
2
141
Status
Physical Therapist

obiwan

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 26, 2006
686
46
261
Texas
Status
Attending Physician
1.UCSF hospitalist handbook. Most of us start out with HH and pocket medicine and end up with only the green book. the advantage I have found is that it gives more concrete instruction though the redbook is also good.

2. postcall. http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.gotbourbon.com/makers.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.gotbourbon.com/makers.html&usg=__lvxSuQToOxZKBjC8wiNM35EvBL0=&h=714&w=349&sz=59&hl=en&start=14&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=4oTnxEuC7QWixM:&tbnh=140&tbnw=68&prev=/images?q=makers+mark&um=1&hl=en&client=safari&sa=N&rls=en&tbs=isch:1
where can one find this UCSF handbook?
 

dreamfox

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2008
133
2
91
Status
Attending Physician
best intern prep:
1) see your friends/family
2) go outside
3) party
4) don't open a book

nothing you read will have any relevance to being an intern, so enjoy life right now.