aldol16

2+ Year Member
Nov 1, 2015
4,936
3,466
Status
Medical Student
I know you don't like your current book but try looking into Lehninger. It's a super well written book and your school library might have a copy of it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: eteshoe
8

863168

@aldol16 Forcing someone to read through Lehninger's is low yield. This guy knows it too!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
About the Ads

timephone

2+ Year Member
Aug 22, 2015
165
135
Status
Pre-Medical
AK Lectures has a lot of free lessons on biochem: AK Lectures - Biochemistry

I haven't used his lectures much, and I've just started biochemistry at my school, but the selection of topics seems fairly extensive and detailed. His style of lecturing also seems more suited to review of the material rather than first-time learning. His voice is a little annoying though. :laugh:
 
  • Like
Reactions: BombsAway
8

863168

@google12 There are no shortcuts in Biochemistry. It is literally the application of chemistry to biological systems. Anyone who has taken the class more than twice can likely tell you that the second time they learned it varied drastically from the first time, however the first time was still instrumental in establishing a basic understanding of the science. I would instead ask these questions: what don't I understand, why don't I understand, and how can I make time in order to understand? Before you consult outside material, it is more important for a Biochemistry student to develop a read on their professor and what they emphasize when it comes to the content of the course.

For instance, if this is the first week or the second week of fall semester you have reviewed the basic law of biochemistry: DNA [transcription] mRNA [translation] protein. Your first chapter is a vague overview and the second chapter is about hydrogen interactions: van der waals, london dispersion forces, and basic chemistry shapes for basic biomolecules. Then your third chapter is probably energetics which concern stoichiometry, energy conversation, exergonic, and endergonic reactions. Then your fourth chapter may finally be starting amino acids.

The question now deals with what do you find confusing about those subjects and how you resolve it. Is it the volume of information that gets to you? You stated in a prior post that you identified as being a lazy student and Khan Academy saved your butt in Organic Chemistry. But you don't need more resources. For example, does your professor want you to learn all the amino acids by chemical structure? By this, I don't mean whether he wants you to identify the importance of a cystein-serine residue when it comes to iron-sulfide bridges. That is a given requirement. But, I am talking about whether he expects you to draw a serine molecule on the board or a proline residue from rote memory. This is again different from asking what the structural role of proline is when it comes to establishing structure within a protein. Do you get me? You can work smarter, not harder.
 

workaholic181

2+ Year Member
May 29, 2017
1,292
818
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
The above poster is right, biochem simply takes a lot of effort but you get out what you put in. Easily my favorite class in college.

Khan Academy can help with some more basic stuff but especially for pathways your textbook is probably the best way to go. Good luck!
 
  • Like
Reactions: eteshoe and 863168

Piglet2020

2+ Year Member
Apr 21, 2016
424
561
I'm not sure what your Biochem I covers since I took both parts of Biochem in one class, but I would recommend doing practice problems just like how you would have done in Orgo. I found that these two classes are quite similar, but biochem was a bit easier. It's mostly rote memorization of structures and reasons why the structures are important in the biological sense.

Online resources didn't really help me other than to clarify the differences between some amino acids.

Find out how your professor likes to exam. My professor posted past exams so we had a lot of practice problems.
 

popopopop

7+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2011
1,416
869
DFW/Houston
Status
Medical Student
Lippincott's Illustrated Review Series helped me for biochem, both in undergrad and during my first block of med school.
 

aldol16

2+ Year Member
Nov 1, 2015
4,936
3,466
Status
Medical Student
@aldol16 Forcing someone to read through Lehninger's is low yield. This guy knows it too!
@Pina Colada So far, it's not the volume or material itself, it's just how the material is explained. We're doing general chemistry review right now, and I know most of the topics, but the way the book explains a few topics is weird and I just didn't want that to confuse me later on when I encounter topics I don't know.
Obviously don't read through the whole thing or even through a whole chapter. Whatever topic you don't understand, look it up in Lehninger and read that section.

I referred to Lehninger all the time when I taught. Excellent resource for clarifying concepts that students struggle with.
 
  • Like
Reactions: eteshoe

MoofUniversity

5+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
6
6
California, United States
www.MoofUniversity.com
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm obviously a bit biased, but I'd highly recommend my YouTube channel, Moof University, as a free resource to help you learn biochemistry, just as allantois and elevatone did. I cover nearly everything from the basics on Acids and Bases all the way to (and through) Replication, Transcription, and Translation. I, of course, also have videos on metabolism of all the macromolecules (carbs, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids). Check out the YouTube channel, and if you want a suggested viewing order, check out my the video links on my website; it's easier to scroll through what I've got there. If you've got any questions, ask away! Cheers! :]
 
  • Like
Reactions: Funny_Current
About the Ads