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A person is born with a genetic defect that produces abnormal microtubules. How are cells of the larynx and trachea also greatly affected?
 

okiedokeartichoke

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I can't really reference what question you're referring to in Destroyer since we probably have different editions, but from my understanding, I think it has to do with the structural lining of the larynx and trachea? I believe they're both lined with cilliated pseudostratified columnar epithelial tissue. Cilia is made out of microtubules arranged in a 9+2 array and they help "sweep" out the airways in the respiratory tract from mucus, pathogens, or other debris. It acts like a protective mechanism to prevent unwanted particles travelling into the lungs. Thus, if a person is born with this genetic defect producing microtubule abnormalities, then it probably affects that clearing function of the cilia.

Someone please correct me if I'm completely off base. I realize I never even saw that question in the Destroyer I have (2015) so I'm just spitballing ideas :p Was there not an explanation in the back of the book?
 
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BioTic
Dec 31, 2015
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I can't really reference what question you're referring to in Destroyer since we probably have different editions, but from my understanding, I think it has to do with the structural lining of the larynx and trachea? I believe they're both lined with cilliated pseudostratified columnar epithelial tissue. Cilia is made out of microtubules arranged in a 9+2 array and they help "sweep" out the airways in the respiratory tract from mucus, pathogens, or other debris. It acts like a protective mechanism to prevent unwanted particles travelling into the lungs. Thus, if a person is born with this genetic defect producing microtubule abnormalities, then it probably affects that clearing function of the cilia.

Someone please correct me if I'm completely off base. I realize I never even saw that question in the Destroyer I have (2015) so I'm just spitballing ideas :p Was there not an explanation in the back of the book?
Not for those options, but what you said makes sense.
 
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A person is born with a genetic defect that produces abnormal microtubules. How are cells of the larynx and trachea also greatly affected?
Cells in the larynx and trachea (mucosal cells) are highly mitotic. In order for mitosis to occur, spindle fibers need to be present. Since, microtubule polymerization is compromised, mitosis of those cells cannot occur. Therefore, those tissues are affected.

Hope this helps.
 
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