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Board passing stats

Discussion in 'Pre-Veterinary' started by Max Power, Apr 21, 2007.

  1. Max Power

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    Is there any way to look at the individual schools board stats?? I could only find accredited us schools first time, second time, and then for foreign schools. I'm curious b/c during the st. george's presentation i went to they gave the average, with some us accredited schools ranging from 98% first time passing to 60%, with st. george's being 2% less than the us average last year. I'd like to know who got the 60%! I'm stuck between tuskegee and st. george, but it seems the accreditation process is a little political...to me the proof is in the pudding so to speak.
     
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  3. aggiegolf

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    Individual statistics are difficult to find. Most vet schools have the NAVLE passing rate posted somewhere in their website. The University of Pennsylvania lists their passing rate for the past few years, and they also indicate how many students took it and how many failed. Sometimes only one person out of the entire class would fail. I know Purdue University is at 98%.

    University of Glasgow (AVMA Accredited)-- 80%

    And yes, the AVMA is political. The state boards are equally so. :)


    If an AVMA accredited university has a passing level of 60%, they are in big trouble. They have to maintain an average 80% passing rate to maintain their accreditation status. I believe it will be increasing to 85% in 2008.

    I wouldn't get too caught up in the statistics though. Whether it's vet school or med school, you will have to do a lot of outside reading to learn everything you need to know. From what I have observed, every vet school throws out pretty much the same material. I've heard that the Merck Veterinary Manual is a good study source for the NAVLE (that's what my dad studied when he took it).


    If I had to choose between Tuskegee and St. George's, I would choose SGU. Sure you'll have to go through a few more steps to get licensed in the states, but I honestly believe SGU will prepare you better. And 29 of their students have transferred back to a US school so that could always be an option also. Anyway, sorry for the length. Hope this helps.





    Michael
    SMU SVM '11
     
  4. Nexx

    Nexx 2 weeks and counting
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    Personally, I'd go to Tuskegee over SGU regardless of any stats. Going to an AVMA accredited school would seem to make things so much easier. As it stands right now if you were to go to SGU you are also looking at having to take the ECFVG in addition to the NAVLE.

    Tuskegee has produced some amazing vets that I have been able to work with both in our office and through our telemedicine services.

    But then again, living and going to school on the beach is also a big draw :p~
     
  5. aggiegolf

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    That is true. And part of the ECVFG is the Clinical Proficiency Examination (CPE) which I've heard is a real beyotch. And it's super expensive too (around or over 5,000??). I don't know. The beaches won me over. :cool:
     
  6. laurafinn

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    Do you know what the attrition rate is at SGU? I'd be curious to know how many people drop out before they get to the taking-the-NAVLE stage.

    If given a choice, I would never choose an unaccredited school over an accredited one, if only because the ECFVG process seems like a PITA.
     
  7. River5

    River5 KSU CVM class of 2011
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    When I interviewed at Tuskeegee last year I was told by several professors and students that they had a 98% passing rate on the boards. I don't know if that is changed or not but enough people quoted the same number while I was down there that I believed them. Also, my first small animal job was with a Tuskeegee graduate and she was amazing.
     
  8. BanLVG

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    MaxPower, have you gotten a decision from Tuskegee already? I interviewed there too and haven't heard anything yet. IMO, I would defnitely choose Tuskegee over SGU. At my interview, 3 students gave me a tour of the campus. I had asked them if they were happy with their choice of school and all three adamantly replied, "YES! Absolutely". Everyone seemed so nice and friendly. I am also thinking about how much it would cost to go to SGU vs. Tuskegee.
     
  9. Max Power

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    no haven't heard anything yet..just speaking theoretically i guess. I didn't realize anyone else interviewed at tuskegee on here! thought i was all alone. I'm aware of the extra test. I don't know that always selecting an accredited school over an unaccredited one is the way to go for everyone...it seems to take away from all the other factors that go into selecting a school. I think what I was getting at is that being accredited doesn't automatically put a school above a foreign one. I think tuskegee would be a great school. I also thing SGU would be as well from what I've heard. Vet school is what you make of it. Foreign schools probably turn out a lot of exceptional students, and I'm sure american schools turn out a few sub-par ones. All things equal, I would like to have an opportunity to see other parts of the world and meet some people from all over. As far as cost, the difference between 150K debt and 200K debt, well you're pretty screwed either way. Money doesn't really matter to me...being a vet will make me happy...even if I'm paying off loans when I'm 60 :p
     
  10. lteddygrahamsl

    lteddygrahamsl Western CVM 2011
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    Hey MaxPower, statistics are just statistics. I think you should go where you believe it will help your studies the most. Vet school can have a 100% pass rate now, but it won't guarantee 100% pass rate 4 years from when you graduate. Its all about what you make of your veterinary education. All schools will give you basically the same information. Its what you make of it that will be important over statistics. You should go to the school you think will best suite your learning needs. Best of luck in your decision :-D :)
     
  11. Max Power

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    also, a friend at tuskegee said the letters were all sent friday...just so you know!
     
  12. aggiegolf

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    I was urged by a couple of accredited schools to strengthen my application just a bit and reapply, but I've always wanted to travel and experience other cultures also. And in your fourth year you can pretty much choose which school you want to do your clinicals at (most people get their first choice, but sometimes you don't).

    It's a really tough decision. Just have faith that it'll all work out.
     
  13. birdvet2006

    birdvet2006 Glasgow c/o 2006
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    I don't know if you're familiar with PAVE - but it's a much better way to get ECFVG (or bypass the CPE)...it's an exam you take after your pre-clinical years, from what I understand. So it's not that difficult to work in the US after graduating if you plan ahead and prepare for the PAVE.
     
  14. laurafinn

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    Wow. $50,000 IS a big difference that I would not shrug off.

    Over 30 years:
    $150K = $977/month, total repaid $352,038
    $200K = $1,304/month, total repaid $469,386

    More aggressive repayments, over 20 years:
    $150K = $1,145/month, total repaid $274,802
    $200K = $1,500/month, total repaid $366,403

    By the time you're finished paying, that $50K difference has ballooned up to $100K.

    Meanwhile, that extra $300-$400/month could have paid for your groceries, or part of your rent or for car repair or your retirement fund.

    I'm taking out $200K, so this is kinda me being the pot calling the kettle black. Even though I am not a materialistic person, the loan repayments are going to affect my quality of life, probably pretty seriously. I don't think the opportunity to reduce student debt is something you should discard out of hand.
     
  15. aggiegolf

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    I'm still thinking about the PAVE. The only thing I don't like is that it isn't recognized by every state yet. It's recognized in the state I plan on practicing in, but I hate to feel limited in where I can go. I guess you could always go back and take the CPE if you wanted to practice in a state that doesn't recognize PAVE.
     
  16. Max Power

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    whoa...i bet you're fun at parties


    didn't think i'd need the calculator for studentdoctor forums...the point was the money is not the issue....quality of life to me is not measured in dollars and cents...we're not talking about living in poverty here after graduating with a DVM...in the grand scheme of things it really doesn't matter to me
     
  17. Max Power

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    actually I've already figured out that sgu will cost me 7,000 more a year in loans....so actually the 50K was a way overshoot...easy with the disrespect of others life decisions
     
  18. Max Power

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    also the thing to remember about long term repayments of loans....go back to econ 101 and remember that interest rate has a little something to do with inflation (not a big factor over a few years...but over 20-30 that extra money you have to pay is a reflection of the depreciation of money over time)
     
  19. laurafinn

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    :D You have no idea.

    Seriously, though, most vets only make $65K a year coming out of school. Paying off $200K in loans *will* put you in the "living in poverty" category once you've paid taxes, rent/mortgage, utilities, food and car insurance. And while vets salaries do rise as you gain experience, they don't top off at that much, unless you become a practice owner and/or a specialist.
     
  20. aggiegolf

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    Yep that's true. My dad's vet clinic grosses over 200,000 a year (mixed animal practice). And there's only one other vet on our staff. At the Western Veterinary Conference (continuing education), some guy said that the average M.D. makes around 135,000 after a certain number of years, and vets are around 115,000.

    I've seen a lot of different averages of what vets make. Some are 50,000 then others over 100,000. All I know for sure is how much my family's clinic makes, and we're in a really small town too. The money is out there if you really want/need it.

    I'm really thinking about being a diplomat in something. I think it would be great to be a General Practicioner, but also have a specialty in something. That way you have something extra to offer that sets you apart from your competitors.
     
  21. bakaduin

    bakaduin UF CVM Class of 2012
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    I agree with you aggie. I see figures online that say the avg vet makes 50k and have to remind myself that its just that, an avg. If you want to be a vet and not make much cash their are certainly plenty of jobs out their but their are also plenty of high paying jobs. I work for a small animal vet in an upscale city who made quite a bit more than the avg per year. Like you said the money is out there.
     
  22. Max Power

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    ill make sure to check back here and let you know if I'm living in poverty because of my vet school loans lol

    america's view of poverty, what is that, you only have 2 tv's instead of 3?
     
  23. aggiegolf

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    I need at least 7 for every master bedroom in my mansion. :laugh:


    -------

    "My therapist was right! I'm unloved, unappreciated, and I only have one car....."
     

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