Drrrrrr. Celty

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Well medicals tend to look primarily on your stats, ec's and life experiences and then your school name. I'll also say not to go to Cornell because its hard as hell to get above a 3.5 there even as a humanities major.
Guaranteed medical school? Check the real requirements, like if you need to have a certain gpa or something or a certain mcat. Also is this school in the US?

John hopkins and harvard both are like 1/6000 chances of getting in period. It all depends if you've got good stats and ec's etc. You could be going to JHU honestly have a 4.0 and a 38 mcat and still not get in to those schools. However it's good to remember the bases of any American medical school is a good medical school.

Needless to say if I were you i'd be choosing between the city school and the MD/BS. However seriously do research on the program, like what gpa you need to maintain and if you need to take the mcat.
What school exactly is the MD/BS at?
 

mmmcdowe

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Hi everyone,
I'm a desperate High School Senior needing some advice.
I've been accepted to a BS/MD/MBA 8 yr program, which gave me little financial aid. I've also been accepted to Cornell and a free honors program at a city college where I live. The city program is reputable, but only within the city I live. Cornell did not give me any money.
I am wondering what your suggestion would be as to which school to go to.
Here are my listed pros/cons to each:
Combined program : Guaranteed Med School // Expensive, Med School Unranked
Cornell: Ivy League , will help me get into Ivy Med Schools // expensive, pre-med is insanely hard
Honors Program: Free // Not Well Known

My dream would be to go to either Harvard or Hopkins for Medical School. Would top tier schools look down on a city college or do they actually accept city college students? (If it is one per every ten thousand, then I understand my chances are very little.....)

Please give me your suggestions as current pre-med students who understand the difficulty of such choice..thank you!
Cheers !
This is an assumption you should throw out of your considerations.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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This is an assumption you should throw out of your considerations.
Major emphasis on this. A 3.7 from a lets say midtier university 1 will be better then a 3.5 from Cornell.
 

schrizto

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BS/MD/MBA 8 yr program

Go. Now. Don't ever look back.
Why? I happen to know this is the Union/Albany LIM program, but the area there is kind of boring and it's mad expensive. The requirements don't sound that hard though, I believe they want a 3.5 and no MCAT.
 

violincuty

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Hi everyone,
I'm a desperate High School Senior needing some advice.
I've been accepted to a BS/MD/MBA 8 yr program, which gave me little financial aid. I've also been accepted to Cornell and a free honors program at a city college where I live. The city program is reputable, but only within the city I live. Cornell did not give me any money.
I am wondering what your suggestion would be as to which school to go to.
Here are my listed pros/cons to each:
Combined program : Guaranteed Med School // Expensive, Med School Unranked
Cornell: Ivy League , will help me get into Ivy Med Schools // expensive, pre-med is insanely hard
Honors Program: Free // Not Well Known

My dream would be to go to either Harvard or Hopkins for Medical School. Would top tier schools look down on a city college or do they actually accept city college students? (If it is one per every ten thousand, then I understand my chances are very little.....)

Please give me your suggestions as current pre-med students who understand the difficulty of such choice..thank you!
Cheers !
Wow...you're going through at the high school level what I am going through as a med school applicant. In situations like these, it helps to prioritize what's important to you. I personally put academic freedom at a high priority, and it has led me to give up fully funded "in the bag" options that others may have jumped on. You've probably heard this a million times, but you're going to change so much over the next 4-5 years (and well into your late 20s as well), in ways that you cannot even anticipate. I don't think locking yourself into a medical school program pre-college is a great idea for this reason. You will likely discover research, humanitarian service work, leadership opportunities, clinical exposure, etc that will help you shape your visions for the future. It would be a shame to have to abandon that passion later on if you're bound by a graduate school agreement that you don't really want to be in.

I am not sure how closely places like Hopkins/Harvard look at the name of the school, but I will say when I interviewed at Hopkins that their student population is diverse. They definitely look for more than just a big name college, and if you have your heart set on going there, you can start doing things in college to make yourself competitive for their programs specifically (more than just grades/MCAT score). I think the best advice I can give you, as someone who just finished an amazing college experience, is to follow your heart and your passions. Don't be afraid to try new things, enjoy being a college student, and make sure you do everything you want to do while you're in college, even if it takes a little more time. It will be worth it in the long-run as it will make you more mature, more focused, more well-rounded, and inadvertently, a better applicant for medical school. Whatever you do, try not to restrict yourself or do things just to check off a list of "requirements for medical school". Not only will this be transparent when you apply, it will also make your college experience much less enjoyable.

Good luck and congrats on the options!! I came from a less than perfect set of circumstances and accomplished my goals, so I am sure you will be just fine. Feel free to email me at [email protected] if you ever have any questions or want to see a copy of my AMCAS to see how ECs are organized :)
 

CaliGirl14

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Why? I happen to know this is the Union/Albany LIM program, but the area there is kind of boring and it's mad expensive. The requirements don't sound that hard though, I believe they want a 3.5 and no MCAT.
Because the OP doesn't have to stress over MCAT/GPA/ECs/e.t.cs...and yes it's going to be pricey..that's adding 4 years of undegrad $$$ and 4 years of medical school $$$$ :scared:

I'd kill to know that I don't have to worry about getting into med school
 

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This is an assumption you should throw out of your considerations.
agreed.

honestly, i'd choose the free city college. not just because it's free (everyone on SDN knows i think debt is okay :p) but because:

1. i'd be hesitant to lock myself into an MD and an MBA at the age of 17. maybe you're not feeling that way, but it's something to consider. you'll be really different in four years than you are now.

2. you can (presumably) do really, really well academically and personally at the city college if you put your nose to the grindstone. stand out. explore lots of things besides medicine. take random classes and try random ECs. if you're still interested in medicine at the end of it all, you'll hopefully have a well-balanced application and a high GPA. i don't know much about cornell but it sounds like that would be harder to accomplish there? :shrug:

3. with all of that said... don't pick a college with med school in mind. where will you be happiest for the next four years? are these your only 3 options, or are there other ones you've already crossed off that you might want to reconsider?
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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Why? I happen to know this is the Union/Albany LIM program, but the area there is kind of boring and it's mad expensive. The requirements don't sound that hard though, I believe they want a 3.5 and no MCAT.
In that case I'd say that he should consider it then. No mcat is a major bonus and the area might be boring but eh risk fighting for acceptances tomorrow rather then today is the premise here. However the above person brings up a extremely important point. Locking yourself into such a contract at age 17 is ridiculous because you might just decide to be a artist or something.
 

schrizto

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In that case I'd say that he should consider it then. No mcat is a major bonus and the area might be boring but eh risk fighting for acceptances tomorrow rather then today is the premise here. However the above person brings up a extremely important point. Locking yourself into such a contract at age 17 is ridiculous because you might just decide to be a artist or something.
It is still a very expensive program. Think paying private school tuition (about 50k/yr now) at Union and AMC for 8 years. The deal here is the spot in medical school, and I suppose many would say that's what really matters.
 
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agreed.

honestly, i'd choose the free city college. not just because it's free (everyone on SDN knows i think debt is okay :p) but because:

1. i'd be hesitant to lock myself into an MD and an MBA at the age of 17. maybe you're not feeling that way, but it's something to consider. you'll be really different in four years than you are now.

2. you can (presumably) do really, really well academically and personally at the city college if you put your nose to the grindstone. stand out. explore lots of things besides medicine. take random classes and try random ECs. if you're still interested in medicine at the end of it all, you'll hopefully have a well-balanced application and a high GPA. i don't know much about cornell but it sounds like that would be harder to accomplish there? :shrug:

3. with all of that said... don't pick a college with med school in mind. where will you be happiest for the next four years? are these your only 3 options, or are there other ones you've already crossed off that you might want to reconsider?
Free sounds nice to me. You got into Cornell, so you're obviously smart enough to do well in undergrad and on the MCAT. Take the free tuition and get into the best medical school you can get into (if that's what you still want to do 4 years from now).
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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It is still a very expensive program. Think paying private school tuition (about 50k/yr now) at Union and AMC for 8 years. The deal here is the spot in medical school, and I suppose many would say that's what really matters.
Hmm 400k debt for 8 years of schooling. Yah, i'm going to say go ahead and go to the city school would cut your loses by around 160k. It's a lot of cash but, there's still the possibility this kid might end up losing a seat which he might never be able to get. So, its up the to the kid, if he's ok with 400k debt then well....
 
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It is still a very expensive program. Think paying private school tuition (about 50k/yr now) at Union and AMC for 8 years. The deal here is the spot in medical school, and I suppose many would say that's what really matters.
not really. that's a high premium to pay for a guarantee at a school that many applicants would otherwise consider undesirable due to location/expense. getting into med school is tough--it's not impossible for those who are academically capable. I think the risk-reward here is favorable enough for OP to turn down the Union/AMC offer and go the traditional route.
 

LizzyM

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The people smart enough to get into those 8 year programs generally figure out at year 3 that they could have done better for med school than what they've got. Then they end up applying out (in some cases giving up the guaranteed admission at the other place) and then the adcoms say, "why are you applying out when you have a guaranteed spot?". The answer to that needs to be well thought out so as not to sound like a snob.

Keep in mind, too, that exposed to other things in college, your interests may change yet you could be walking out of undergrad with some serious debt and an interest in a career that while satisfying, may not pay enough to retire that debt quickly.

The MBA is wasted, in my opinion, on anyone who has not had 5 years of work experience at the executive level.
 

ronaldo23

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Why? I happen to know this is the Union/Albany LIM program, but the area there is kind of boring and it's mad expensive. The requirements don't sound that hard though, I believe they want a 3.5 and no MCAT.
this. I would think very long and hard about living in a place like albany for 8 years.
 

violincuty

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The MBA is wasted, in my opinion, on anyone who has not had 5 years of work experience at the executive level.

How do you feel about an MPH? Does it make students more competitive for residencies? I have an interest in third-world infectious disease and was considering entering into a combined MD-MPH program. Would you advise against this? I don't know too much about Masters programs. Thanks! :)
 

LizzyM

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How do you feel about an MPH? Does it make students more competitive for residencies? I have an interest in third-world infectious disease and was considering entering into a combined MD-MPH program. Would you advise against this? I don't know too much about Masters programs. Thanks! :)
I've seen a number of MD/MPH students and they report that residency directors are impressed by the additional skills they have by having the dual degrees.
 

dw2158

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I've seen a number of MD/MPH students and they report that residency directors are impressed by the additional skills they have by having the dual degrees.
here's a more important question/one that's been weighing on me since i'm considering an MPH-- for people interested in community health (urban, low-income populations, for example) do you think getting an MPH that allows you to explore that area actually gives you valuable skills that will lead to a more meaningful practice of medicine down the road? or can you get take advantage of the opportunities necessary to explore those interests without getting the masters?
 

Jolt21

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Cornell. You'll have more opportunities to enjoy college/find something you REALLY love (EC's, clubs, more types of classes, etc.). The next four years can be some of the best in your life. I think debt is worth it. It's also possible to do great at Cornell and get merit aid to a great med school. (Harvard doesnt give merit aid, so that would just be more debt)

can i just say, the food at Cornell....:claps:

i cant believe students get that for four years... :boom:
 

Jolt21

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i'd also toss out the BS/MD/MBA option. too long in one place and too restricting.
 

Suenya

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Free school. You'll do fine.
 
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Hay,

So in regards to your options--you have quite a few. Is the city college a junior college or just a smaller university? Medical schools do not look down on students who attend junior colleges and then transfer to more prestigious universities.

I am a CA resident, and I attend San Diego State University. We are the o top CSU for CA ( not a UC), but we also the reputation of a "party school." UCSD is a well known UC in California and also a well known (top tier) medical school in CA. In my case, a 4.0 at SDSU is like a 3.8 at UCSD. So certain/some medical schools do consider "less prestigious/not IVY/UC schools" as having an easier curriculum and therefore weight the GPAs differently. The name of the school you get your undergraduate degree from, does matter...at least a little (I've talked to admission counselors and MD students). However, if you went to a junior college first and then were to transfer to UCSD to finish your degree, your chances would be great as long as you kept up your grades. GRADES, MCAT SCORES, RESEARCH & RANDOM PASSION (you need those to get in)

In many cases, it's not where you go, but who you know. But in many cases schools like Cornell have a lot of well known people who work there, who can offer great research opportunities as well as internships or global programs.. schools like that have money to do that.

But your guaranteed BA/MBA/MD program sounds pretty good. What school is it through? Will you be happy staying at that school or living in that area for 8 years. How good is the program? These are all things you should consider.
 

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go to city college honors. affordable+college experience+you won't feel like you're stuck there= better experience.
 
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Dear Friends,
First off, thank you so much for your time and help ! It's truly amazing to see people who are still willing to help an underclassman (especially in such a sometimes vicious field as pre-med).
The program I am talking about is the LIM Program. Although an amazing program, it will cause me to graduate with an abundance of loans. AMC is also not the best of med schools and I am afraid I will always in part regret not being able to do "better". Yet the gurantee, and the triple degree, is so tempting, especially when so many people get rejected from med schools.
I've had much research experience, clinical experience and so forth that I have decided I want to be a endocrinologist, which is one of the harder residencies to obtain. Does the caliber of the med school matter then getting matched to such a high-demanded residency?
The program at CUNY is called " The macaulay honors college".
On average, what does it take to get into schools like Harvard and JHU, other than a high MCAT and a GPA?
Thank you all so mcuh!
 

schrizto

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not really. that's a high premium to pay for a guarantee at a school that many applicants would otherwise consider undesirable due to location/expense. getting into med school is tough--it's not impossible for those who are academically capable. I think the risk-reward here is favorable enough for OP to turn down the Union/AMC offer and go the traditional route.
That's why I said "I suppose many would" because I know there are premeds who appear to want an MD at any cost. I wasn't saying that the 8 year program is the way to go, because I wouldn't want to pay that much to go to Union either.
 

schrizto

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Dear Friends,
First off, thank you so much for your time and help ! It's truly amazing to see people who are still willing to help an underclassman (especially in such a sometimes vicious field as pre-med).
The program I am talking about is the LIM Program. Although an amazing program, it will cause me to graduate with an abundance of loans. AMC is also not the best of med schools and I am afraid I will always in part regret not being able to do "better". Yet the gurantee, and the triple degree, is so tempting, especially when so many people get rejected from med schools.
I've had much research experience, clinical experience and so forth that I have decided I want to be a endocrinologist, which is one of the harder residencies to obtain. Does the caliber of the med school matter then getting matched to such a high-demanded residency?
The program at CUNY is called " The macaulay honors college".
On average, what does it take to get into schools like Harvard and JHU, other than a high MCAT and a GPA?
Thank you all so mcuh!
Well to become an endocrinologist you have to go through an internal medicine residency first and then apply for a endocrinology fellowship. In terms of competition, endocrinology is not as competitive as other fellowships done after IM such as cardiology or gastroenterology. I don't think going to AMC would hurt you at all in obtaining the residency you want.

Macaulay Honors is actually a pretty well known program. Brooklyn College doesn't have its own dorms however, which kind of sucks because you have to rent your own place so there isn't the living on campus experience. I would put that under consideration.
 
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schrizto, is Macaulay Honors only known within NYC (b/c that is what I hear) or throughout east coast med school by now?
 

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The MBA is wasted, in my opinion, on anyone who has not had 5 years of work experience at the executive level.
While this may not make as much sense to the OP right now, this is dead on accurate. An MBA is most valuable with at least 3-5 years of business experience, with the Executive MBA applying specifically to the above statement.

If you get it for free, it may be worth checking out, but otherwise I would skip it.
 

schrizto

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If you get it for free, it may be worth checking out, but otherwise I would skip it.
I'm pretty sure students in the LIM have to pay for the MBA (from Union Graduate School) and I don't think there's an option to skip. They give you the option of an MBA or an MS for that one year.