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Buoyancy Force

Discussion in 'MCAT Study Question Q&A' started by faith hopelove, May 13, 2014.

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  1. faith hopelove

    faith hopelove God Fearing 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 14, 2012
    A quick question. How do you know when to use the density of the fluid vs the density of the object? Sometimes I find that I get answers wrong because I plugged in the density of the object rather than the density of the fluid. Also, gravity has no effect on mass/the buoyancy force?
     
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  3. labqi

    labqi 2+ Year Member

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    11
    May 8, 2013
    Buoyant force = p(fluid)v(submerged or displaced)g
    Gravitational force= mg = p(object)v(object)g.

    When the object is floating density,
    Buoyant force = gravitational force
     
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  4. Sammy1024

    Sammy1024

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    Dec 12, 2013
    Buoyancy always uses density if fluid.
     
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  5. faith hopelove

    faith hopelove God Fearing 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 14, 2012
    Oh ok so I was mixing up buoyancy force with the weight of the object?
     
  6. labqi

    labqi 2+ Year Member

    119
    11
    May 8, 2013
    Buoyant force = the weight of the displaced fluid OR the reduction in weight (not to be confused with apparent weight)
     
  7. NextStepTutor_1

    NextStepTutor_1 Next Step MCAT Tutor Exhibitor 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 29, 2014
    SDN Exhibitor
    Also it might help to take a crack at deriving the formulas that you will use in hydro statics--namely gauge pressure and buoyant force. Gauge pressure is just the force per area on an object. So, you need to find the force a column of water exerts on an object--meaning you are dealing with density of liquid.

    For buoyant force, it's actually derived from the difference in gauge pressure between the top of the object and the bottom, so again, you would use the density of the liquid.
     

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