Can't decide: should I do FP or Peds

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by question, Oct 18, 2002.

  1. question

    question Member

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    Help me somebody...I can't make up my mind. I keep switching back and forth. I'm not sure whether to apply to FP or Peds. I'm not exactly in love with obstetrics, surgery (all the stuff FP does as an intern). Then again I love kids but I'm afraid it could be stressful talking to (often angry) parents of a sick child. Is the residency for one easier than the other? Somebody please help me!!!
     
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  3. notstudying

    notstudying Senior Member
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    Several thoughts...just the opinions of one 3rd year who's looked into this alot (and I have friends who are residents in all three).

    Where do you want to settle? East or West? Rural/urban/suburbs? Private practice or academics? Specialty? All have different profiles.

    What about med-peds? You treat adults and kids, like FP, but there's no OB (not my favorite, either). Practices tend to be younger because they attract families with small children who are usually not elderly adults. Downside is a four year residency with heavy inpatient responsibility. Very few programs in the West (in GENERAL, med peds practitioners tend to be valued more in the east, while FPs are valued more in the west. There are also a growing number of practices with both an FP and a Med-Peds doc.). There are an increasing number of fellowships specifically for med-peds trained docs in things like cardiology and pulmonology, to follow kids with pediatric diseases that are now living into adulthood (CF for one).

    Not all FPs do OB, and both OB and surgery requirements vary greatly by program-some with less emphasis than others. Difficulty of program also varies, and with the new work hours rules it's tough to compare with Peds. There aren't many fellowships post FP, and fewer options in academics than other specialties. FPs are worshipped in rural areas where they can provide excellent comprehensive care to communities without other practices.

    Most parents in peds aren't angry, and many are wonderful to work with and are so thankful that you helped their child. The pediatricians I have known (and it's a big sample size) are in general a nice bunch. Lots of fellowship opportunities (see thread in Pediatrics forum). Personally I think private practice peds would be a little boring (Otitis, otitis, otitis, -look a GI bug! :)), but then again I probably should be on ritalin so I'm not one to talk!

    When are you applying? Can you apply to both programs to check them out?

    Good luck!
     
  4. jdog

    jdog Senior Member

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    If you think talking to a paranoid parent is stressful, try talking to a 275 pound smoker who drinks and hasn't done exercise since 1975 and then trying to write his 13 perscriptions and refills in the allotted 7 minutes that managed care gives you too see a patient. A slightly scaving look, but not very far from reality in many instances.

    FP: Primary care till you die

    Peds: almost 20 subspecialties to do fellowships in.
     
  5. jhug

    jhug 1K Member

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    jdog-- that is REALLY funny!!!!!:D :D :D
     
  6. Surfer75

    Surfer75 Senior Member

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    Aside from what was posted above regarding IM and the countless chronics and multiple medical problems and meds what are the pros/cons between IM and Peds... would you say the hours in peds are much more than IM? Are the fellowships on a whole more competitive in one over the other? Is compensation much higher for IM than peds on a whole? Just curious... I've wanted to do IM for some time now, but lately I've been wondering if I should apply to peds as well.

    :D
     
  7. Most of the outcomes in peds are happy.
    Caring for kids isn't as easy as one might think, and sort of dabbling in it is what you'll do as an FP, so if you are serious about taking care of sick children, do a peds residency.

    If you want to be jack of all trades, master of none, do FP.

    If you want to do sick adults and kids, and do both well, do med peds.
     

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